Weatherby 340 for a female?

Help Support CattleToday:

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
6
Location
MO Ozarks
Caustic Burno":21ulflqa said:
Commercialfarmer":21ulflqa said:
dun":21ulflqa said:
A Ruger #1 takes care of the "handed" issues.

That's good information. We have a lefty that will needing something some day.

I'll start looking this direction for new additions.

Look at a Browning 1885 as well.
The high wall is a bit less elegant looking, I prefer the Low wall. But the #1 is a pretty classy looking action. But that's an eye of the beholder kind of thing.
 
OP
greybeard

greybeard

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 5, 2012
Messages
19,921
Reaction score
779
Location
Cleveland Tx
Not much worse then a Mk V weatherby

Well, brother is a town dweller, doesn't have to buy hay, feed or mineral & is a little more apt and able to open his wallet for more firearms than I am...

(momma always said he was smarter than me...)
 

js1234

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2011
Messages
835
Reaction score
0
Dave":39hqggu3 said:
greybeard":39hqggu3 said:
I asked him about the same thing Dave. He just said "It was there, price was right and left hand rifles are hard to find around here"..

My oldest son is also left handed. With a little shopping around and not getting in too big of a hurry he found a nice Remington 700 in 7 Mag. He passed on several other left handed rifles before I bought the Remington. They are out there.
As to the "who buys a .340?" thing, It's too small for Lions in most countries and certainly too small for thick skinned dangerous game too. On my trips to Africa for Dangerous game, I've always used my .416 Rigby, other than my Leopard which I did shoot with my .300 Weatherby, as it would happen.

The only .340 I've ever seen in the field was the one the Brown Bear guide packed that I mentioned. he told me that it does have a certain cult following amongst guys in his line of work but in reality, I'd wager that IF 1/2 of them pack one, which they most certainly don't, that's less than 100 rifles total. I took my .338 Winchester Magnum and my Brother in Law took his. 30-378 Weatherby Magnum. They both killed bears just dandy.

No denying that the .340 is a very powerful gun that is outstanding on the largest of North American game and has the ballistics to reach out a ways to do it. That said, there are other more mainstream options, more economical to shoot, less punishing and in most cases on nominally inferior in terms of Ft.Lbs. and Fps.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
6
Location
MO Ozarks
I'm thinking he should be able to load it down to about 25 whelen velocitys and make it easier for her to handle
 

js1234

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2011
Messages
835
Reaction score
0
dun":3gy83xk8 said:
I'm thinking he should be able to load it down to about 25 whelen velocitys and make it easier for her to handle
I'm assuming you meant.35 Whelen. Do you shoot one? I've never shot one or seen one in person but I've always been intrigued by it and the 8mm Remington Magnum.
 

Margonme

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2016
Messages
1,768
Reaction score
0
Location
Princedom
js1234":nvcg9mpu said:
dun":nvcg9mpu said:
I'm thinking he should be able to load it down to about 25 whelen velocitys and make it easier for her to handle
I'm assuming you meant.35 Whelen. Do you shoot one? I've never shot one or seen one in person but I've always been intrigued by it and the 8mm Remington Magnum.

js1234, don't know your age but when I was very young, I read a lot of Colonel Townsend Whelen's writing. The 35 Whelen is a 30-06 necked up to receive a .358 diameter bullet which Col. Whelen invented. I was the benefactor of a family friend that was a gunsmith. George Sweeney. He was a marksman who won many bench rest medals at Camp Perry. He built a 35 Whelen on a Winchester M70 action. At the time, you had to fire form your own brass from 30-06.

Another couple of great writers was Elmer Keith and of course maybe the greatest of all time, Jack O'Conner.

If I ever need anything bigger than .375 H&H, I would probably consider one of the .416 calibers, most likely the Remington Magnum.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
6
Location
MO Ozarks
Yeah, I just washed my hands and can;t do a thing with them. The 8 mag is a killer, 35 whelen isn;t bad, about on par with a an 06 with a heavy bullet
 

js1234

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2011
Messages
835
Reaction score
0
Margonme":bosxzup5 said:
js1234":bosxzup5 said:
dun":bosxzup5 said:
I'm thinking he should be able to load it down to about 25 whelen velocitys and make it easier for her to handle
I'm assuming you meant.35 Whelen. Do you shoot one? I've never shot one or seen one in person but I've always been intrigued by it and the 8mm Remington Magnum.

js1234, don't know your age but when I was very young, I read a lot of Colonel Townsend Whelen's writing. The 35 Whelen is a 30-06 necked up to receive a .358 diameter bullet which Col. Whelen invented. I was the benefactor of a family friend that was a gunsmith. George Sweeney. He was a marksman who won many bench rest medals at Camp Perry. He built a 35 Whelen on a Winchester M70 action. At the time, you had to fire form your own brass from 30-06.

Another couple of great writers was Elmer Keith and of course maybe the greatest of all time, Jack O'Conner.

If I ever need anything bigger than .375 H&H, I would probably consider one of the .416 calibers, most likely the Remington Magnum.

I shoot a .416 Rigby. When I was a kid (first DG game hunt was with my father as a teenager) he bought me a Pre 64 Model 70 Safari in .375 H&H. I took a Cape Buffalo, a Crocodile and some PG with it. I went on to use that rifle on more hunts here in the US, I really do trust that gun, which I still have. Before my second trip, a couple years later, I had become infatuated with the .416, thanks to writing of Craig Boddington and the stories of Harry Selby. I had just sold a pretty impressive calf horse, doing quite well on him, and some of the proceeds purchased a Dakota 76 African in .416 Rigby. Nearly 20 years later, that's my DG rifle, having used it on multiple Cape Buffalo, a Hippo, a tuskless, some plains game and then a Banteng and Water Buffalo on a different Continent not to mention overkill on hogs here at home. I have shot a .458 Winchester bolt gun of a friends but I don't see myself getting a bolt gun larger than my .416. I have used my fathers .450/400 Nitro Express double and at some point I'll probably get a double, infact, I've looked at a couple in the last year, one in .450/400 Nitro Express like my Father's and one in .470 Nitro Express. Both are great rounds.
I'm in my late 30's, so while he and O'Conner were both well before my time, I have enjoyed a fair amount of Elmer Keith.
The 8mm. infatuation is also a product of Craig Boddington who, while like everything is open to debate, was probably THE hunting writer in the 90's when I was a teen.
 

Margonme

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2016
Messages
1,768
Reaction score
0
Location
Princedom
js1234":1zu662lk said:
Margonme":1zu662lk said:
js1234":1zu662lk said:
I'm assuming you meant.35 Whelen. Do you shoot one? I've never shot one or seen one in person but I've always been intrigued by it and the 8mm Remington Magnum.

js1234, don't know your age but when I was very young, I read a lot of Colonel Townsend Whelen's writing. The 35 Whelen is a 30-06 necked up to receive a .358 diameter bullet which Col. Whelen invented. I was the benefactor of a family friend that was a gunsmith. George Sweeney. He was a marksman who won many bench rest medals at Camp Perry. He built a 35 Whelen on a Winchester M70 action. At the time, you had to fire form your own brass from 30-06.

Another couple of great writers was Elmer Keith and of course maybe the greatest of all time, Jack O'Conner.

If I ever need anything bigger than .375 H&H, I would probably consider one of the .416 calibers, most likely the Remington Magnum.

I shoot a .416 Rigby. When I was a kid (first DG game hunt was with my father as a teenager) he bought me a Pre 64 Model 70 Safari in .375 H&H. I took a Cape Buffalo, a Crocodile and some PG with it. I went on to use that rifle on more hunts here in the US, I really do trust that gun, which I still have. Before my second trip, a couple years later, I had become infatuated with the .416, thanks to writing of Craig Boddington and the stories of Harry Selby. I had just sold a pretty impressive calf horse, doing quite well on him, and some of the proceeds purchased a Dakota 76 African in .416 Rigby. Nearly 20 years later, that's my DG rifle, having used it on multiple Cape Buffalo, a Hippo, a tuskless, some plains game and then a Banteng and Water Buffalo on a different Continent not to mention overkill on hogs here at home. I have shot a .458 Winchester bolt gun of a friends but I don't see myself getting a bolt gun larger than my .416. I have used my fathers .450/400 Nitro Express double and at some point I'll probably get a double, infact, I've looked at a couple in the last year, one in .450/400 Nitro Express like my Father's and one in .470 Nitro Express. Both are great rounds.
I'm in my late 30's, so while he and O'Conner were both well before my time, I have enjoyed a fair amount of Elmer Keith.
The 8mm. infatuation is also a product of Craig Boddington who, while like everything is open to debate, was probably THE hunting writer in the 90's when I was a teen.

I don't know if you have crossed paths with Richard Brebner, he carried a Remington M 700 in .416 Remington Magnum.

There are some great names in African hunting. Have you met Roger Whittal? Boddington is a big fan of Roger.

I assume you have read Robert Ruark. He hunted with Harry Selby. Those were the classic days of the African safari.
 

Stocker Steve

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2005
Messages
10,905
Reaction score
372
Location
Central Minnesota
Margonme":2lzch99n said:
If I ever need anything bigger than .375 H&H, I would probably consider one of the .416 calibers, most likely the Remington Magnum.

A .45-70 hand load will make a golf ball sized wound channel...
 

Margonme

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2016
Messages
1,768
Reaction score
0
Location
Princedom
Stocker Steve":28p0q5d7 said:
Margonme":28p0q5d7 said:
If I ever need anything bigger than .375 H&H, I would probably consider one of the .416 calibers, most likely the Remington Magnum.

A .45-70 hand load will make a golf ball sized wound channel...

For dangerous game, there are better choices. Wound channel is less important on dangerous game than penetration and bone crushing foot pounds of energy.
 

js1234

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2011
Messages
835
Reaction score
0
Margonme":2vkyhod2 said:
js1234":2vkyhod2 said:
Margonme":2vkyhod2 said:
I don't know if you have crossed paths with Richard Brebner, he carried a Remington M 700 in .416 Remington Magnum.

There are some great names in African hunting. Have you met Roger Whittal? Boddington is a big fan of Roger.

I assume you have read Robert Ruark. He hunted with Harry Selby. Those were the classic days of the African safari.
My Dad's first Safari was in the early 80's with Russ Broom in Zambia. He never has hunted with the Whittall's, nor have I. When we hunted Sango, Roger and his wife (Anne I think it was) did come and have dinner at camp one night. They were there to see Johnathan Hulme and Theirry Labat but they were fantastic and it was an honor to share a table with a legend like Roger.
Ruark is great, Something of Value is an exceptional book.
I've been a total of 6 times to hunt in Africa. 2x Zimbabwe, 2x Namibia, once each to SA and Tanzania. It is truly infectious. I'm going back to Zimbabwe in 2018 assuming things don't change in a prohibitive fashion.
Africa is a magic place and it is infectious, no doubt.
I can hardly wait to share it with my sons.
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
16,495
Reaction score
920
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
On this continent, I don't see what the use of something bigger than a 7mm or .308 is needed. If you have good shot placement, that's 95% of it, and you really oughtn't be pulling the trigger if you don't.. with the exception of "holy carp this thing is chasing me" situations... I've taken down several 2 year old black bears with a caliber I won't even mention, and big full-grown ones didn't move an inch after taking a hit from the .308.

That african stuff has a bit a different hide though!
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
6
Location
MO Ozarks
I've never had any desire to hunt Africa but I read all of the books about from the old time greats. My favorite author concerning African hunting was/is Peter Hathaway Capstick. With a name like that you would expewct him to very BRITISH, but he was born and raised in new jersey.
I loaned one of his books to a non-hunting friend of mine to read on his flights back to the west coast. He really enjoyed it. Goes to show that entertaining writers can bridge gaps.
 

Dave

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 12, 2004
Messages
9,829
Reaction score
1,392
Location
Baker County, Oregon
Nesikep":3ikkjl7t said:
On this continent, I don't see what the use of something bigger than a 7mm or .308 is needed. If you have good shot placement, that's 95% of it, and you really oughtn't be pulling the trigger if you don't.. with the exception of "holy carp this thing is chasing me" situations... I've taken down several 2 year old black bears with a caliber I won't even mention, and big full-grown ones didn't move an inch after taking a hit from the .308.

That african stuff has a bit a different hide though!

You are correct in that shot placement is 95% if not more. And I have shot 2 elk with a 308. But I now pack a 300 Win mag when elk hunting. I know most of the guys who hunt that area and nobody packs a gun as small as a 308. An elk can pack a lot of lead. I also worked in big bear country for several years in Alaska. There is no way on God's green earth that I would hunt brownies or grizzly with a 7mm or a 308. Having been up close and personal with one or two of them will give you a high level of respect for the what those big bears can do.
 

Latest posts

Top