Weaning Weights

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What are the average weaning weights (205 days) that I might have on a 150 head herd of Angus/Brangus based cattle? I am shooting for a 90% weaning and a 600 lb. calf. Is that reasonable? I have strong cool season grass in the North.
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Dave

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A 600 pound weaning weight is certainly a reasonable goal. I would work on a better rate than 90%. By preg checking, vacinating, proper nutition, etc you should be able to achive a 95% weaning rate.
Dave
 
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Anonymous

Dave":10l66ggb said:
A 600 pound weaning weight is certainly a reasonable goal. I would work on a better rate than 90%. By preg checking, vacinating, proper nutition, etc you should be able to achive a 95% weaning rate.
Dave

Dave:
Is that 95% of cows exposed or of calves born?
 

dun

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What are your cows mature weights? Do you supplement or creep? I think those are the two big keys after adequate high level nutrition. 600# from an 1150 or even a 1200# cow is possible, but it isn't likely. If they wean that weight calf, do they breed back to calve the same time the next year? How many years in a row? Are the genetics capable of doing it?
Lots of questions

dun
 

Dave

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I consider weaning rate based on calves born. If you figure it based on cows exposed that would be conception rate. Personally in the fall when I wean calves I preg check all the cows and any found to be open are shipped rather than feed them all winter. 90% weaning rate to me would mean that you lose one calf in ten. I think that you can figure on doing better than that.
Dun is right about weaning weight being tied to genetics. They are also closely tied to environment. From past posts I know that Dun doesn't get that high of an average because he has matched his cows to his environment. I consistantly beat 600 pound weaning weight but my cows would not hold up in Dun's environment. So you certainly need to have the genetics that will work well in your environment.
As Dun said lots of questions.
Dave
 

hillbilly

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Actually Dun is in one of the best environments for cow/calf opperations in the USA.
500 to 550 would be a more reasonable weaning wt for the breeds you described.
How far north are you? You might reconsider the Brangus, buyers dock for ear in the north.
A 50% british/ 50% Continental calf could make 575 to 600#.
The trick is to try to make them look like 75% british, choose breeds with that in mind.

Hillbilly
 

la4angus

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TexasShooter":2q1sxo2u said:
The trick is to try to make them look like 75% british, choose breeds with that in mind

HillBilly, Why 75% British?

Because that is what most of the feedyards prefer and pay a premium for, over other crosses.
 

greenpasture78

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500-700lbs at 6-8 months of age (some prefer 5-7 months) is a good rule of thumb. But the BEST rule of thumb is a calf should be wean at least 60 % of mommas' total weight. A 2000lbs cow weaning an 600 lbs 6 months old calf is not a good ratio! Once had a 900lbs heifer weaned a 625lbs bull calf at 6 mos old! Now that is an excellent ratio! The heifer was small and feed effiecieny is small....but the 2000lbs cow is too big of a mouth to wean a little 600lbs calf.

Good luck to you!
 
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Anonymous

greenpasture78":5tqegbj9 said:
Once had a 900lbs heifer weaned a 625lbs bull calf at 6 mos old! Now that is an excellent ratio!

Who once had? Certainly not you. BTW, a heifer hasn't had a calf. Once she has a calf she becomes a cow.
 

dun

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hillbilly":l2zhfdf1 said:
Actually Dun is in one of the best environments for cow/calf opperations in the USA.
500 to 550 would be a more reasonable weaning wt for the breeds you described.
How far north are you? You might reconsider the Brangus, buyers dock for ear in the north.
A 50% british/ 50% Continental calf could make 575 to 600#.
The trick is to try to make them look like 75% british, choose breeds with that in mind.

Hillbilly

I think the reference is to the high endophyte fescue and not climate. Our heifers typicaly wean 500-525 cows run 550-600. No supplements, just straight pasture.

dun
 

Dave

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Yes Dun, that is exactly one of the difference I was refering to. You have high endophyte fescue. My fescue doesn't know what endophyte is. In my climate I can get away with a higher milk production cow and thus a higher weaning weight but I have to feed a lot more in the winter. It is a trade off.
The expected weaning weight will change with the genetics you are dealing with and the environment you raise your cattle in. The best example I could think of on this is a rangeland cattle operation and one practicing IMG on irrigated pasture. There are places out west where you could be literally be neighbors but your weaning weights will be dramatically different because of the different environments.
Dave
 

ollie

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Gave the nextdoor neighbor some semen out of one of our bulls. He weighed the calf last night . One week short of 6mo. old he weighed 648#.His momma probly weighs 1300#. He is already 50# heavier than the calves his age.
 

greenpasture78

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Anonymous":8z5w5sk9 said:
greenpasture78":8z5w5sk9 said:
Once had a 900lbs heifer weaned a 625lbs bull calf at 6 mos old! Now that is an excellent ratio!

Who once had? Certainly not you. BTW, a heifer hasn't had a calf. Once she has a calf she becomes a cow.

Certainly was me! She was a Charolais x Hereford heifer turned cow... I know what a HEIFER IS! Some people will say its a heifer with a calf on her side as a age reference.... I didn't want to say "cow" then people will start badgering me if that is the only calf she had at that size.... So get off my back please...
 

Texan

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greenpasture78":2mgkl45x said:
Once had a 900lbs heifer weaned a 625lbs bull calf at 6 mos old! Now that is an excellent ratio!

Yes, GP, that is an excellent ratio! You seem to have been wasting your talents with all of the nonsensical posting you do in the Coffee Shop. I'm sure all of us could profit from you sharing more of your management skills and ideas. Maybe you could post a brief summary of what you did to achieve that "excellent ratio?"
 
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Anonymous

Guest, I disagree that a heifer is a cow after she has calved. There are first calf heifers, and we breed back heifers as well. A heifer is a cow when she looks like a cow!
 

la4angus

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Page":2m1cer3h said:
Guest, I disagree that a heifer is a cow after she has calved. There are first calf heifers, and we breed back heifers as well. A heifer is a cow when she looks like a cow!

After a heifer has a calf she then becomes a cow.
 

txag

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Page":3uips1lm said:
Guest, I disagree that a heifer is a cow after she has calved. There are first calf heifers, and we breed back heifers as well. A heifer is a cow when she looks like a cow!

Guest was correct. technically, once a heifer has a calf on the ground she is classified as a cow.

many folks, ourselves included, will still call them first calf heifers.
 

txag

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greenpasture78":1t5m0ewk said:
Certainly was me!

& just where did you fit that "heifer" in your little apartment?

so our tax dollars are buying you cattle as well? interesting that you could raise cattle but your "disabilities" prevent you from getting a job.
 
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