We may all be missing the boat, by not raising Corrientes!

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BFE

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You’re nuts for letting anyone hunt your land today, too many lawyers behind every tree.
I've been accused of that before!

Doesn't have to be that way. Look at Kansas' program, the state pays landowners a fee to allow hunting and fishing access if they choose to participate. Get a map, go hunt. Win-win-win, state, owner, hunter.
 

Caustic Burno

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I had two choices: trespassers or hunt clubs. I chose hunt clubs and have really enjoyed that much more than the destruction and issues of trespassers. Don't think that a trespasser cannot sue you, too. Just be sure that your farm policy accepts commercial hunting and that the club gets annual liability coverage.
That’s the reason I live in Texas landowner is protected from trespassing. Texas is a right to farm state. Whatever you do you do not want to get caught on ag land with a firearm.
 

HDRider

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That’s the reason I live in Texas landowner is protected from trespassing. Texas is a right to farm state. Whatever you do you do not want to get caught on ag land with a firearm.
Compare it to this.

The Right to Roam is an ancient custom that allows anyone to wander in open countryside, whether the land is privately or publicly owned. In countries such as Norway, Sweden, Estonia and Scotland it has existed as a common right, a defining concept of nationhood, and has only recently been codified into law. Central to all versions of it across Europe is that: 1) there are sensible, listed exceptions and modifications to this right; and 2) this right only comes with strict responsibilities to both the ecology and community of an area.​
The Right to Roam is really just a definition of private property that is different to England. There are still major landowners in Norway, Counts in Sweden, Lords in Scotland who own many hundreds of thousands of acres. Their ownership of the land, however, while it allows them to take rent, mine and make money from the land, does not include the right to exclude every other member of the public. In these countries, the Right to Roam is considered so important to the health and mental well-being of a nation, that it supercedes that peculiarly English stipulation of property: the right to exclude. Instead, every person has a right to explore these vast open spaces, to sleep there, to kayak, swim, climb, ride horses and cycle.​
 

Dave

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I am sure happy that I live in a part of the world where pay to hunt is the exception rather than the rule. Over 50% of the state is public land. Locally the majority of the private land (mine included) is posted. However any local who asked is certainly welcome to hunt on it. People I don't know. Well there is literally a million acres of public land in this county. I gladly point out where it is, the access points, and even advise on where there is good hunting.
I posted this picture before. It is all public land with the exception of there is some private by that far off peak to the right. Turn around from where this picture is taken and there is 4 or 5 thousand acres of posted private land that nobody gets to hunt. But it ends up acting as a wildlife sanctuary. The deer and more so the elk get pushed into there and stay safe. Mule deer and elk cover a big area so next year they very likely will be back out in the area open to hunt.
 

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tex452

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You’re nuts for letting anyone hunt your land today, too many lawyers behind every tree.
This is sad but true.
When I was growing up me my brother and friends would roam, hunt and fish everywhere and never gave it a second thought. Now days everybody is afraid of the same thing (lawyers).
I don’t lease out any of my properties but I do let friends and family hunt/fish.
The friend might be one heck of a guy that I know would never try to sue me but if he was to have a fatal accident there’s no telling what his family would do.
 

WTR

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That’s the reason I live in Texas landowner is protected from trespassing. Texas is a right to farm state. Whatever you do you do not want to get caught on ag land with a firearm.
That's the way to do it. A lot of trespassers and poachers out here unfortunately, and you never quite know your rights.

On topic, I used to have a small herd of Corrientes. I think they are great if you're in the right kind of land or pasture situation, like when I was on my relatives' desert scrub.

Right now I'm running black cattle on good ground. So that's my focus.

A lot of guys are losing their shirts with the drought and feed costs out West.
 
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Warren Allison

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He probably went in before daylight to get in his stand, but found it wasn't there! ( Scott put it on FB market place and sold it last week). The poacher got about 1/4 mile from where he was parked before the felt washers did their work. Scott is guessing he called a friend to come get him and bring some jacks... maybe even 3 more spare tires and wheels. Or blocks to set his on. Then they had to go to town, fix 4 flats, and bring them back to his truck. Either way, the poacher and a friend or two, got to spend all day opening day fixing tires. That deer stand can be bought online as cheap as $499.99. Scott got to thinking about it that Sunday after I left, and went back and found a Tactacam trail camera and got it, too. Cheapest he found it new was $119.99 online. So, this tresspassing costs the poacher over $600, plus whatever he had to spend on the tires.
 
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Warren Allison

Warren Allison

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What is the "felt washers" trick?
What you nail down roofing felt with. The old kind with the square, tin heads worked best. No way for them to land anyway except with the nail pointing up. I keep a handful in the pouch between my windshield and handle bars on my bike, for tail-gaters. 1st time, I will use pennies, ball bearings or marbles...depending on which I have on the motorcycle. Usually when they hear that bouncing up and rattling their grill, undercarriage, hood, etc., they back off and stay back. If they come back up on us, they get the felt washers. Now days, on the ones you find at Home Depot, Lowes, etc., the heads are plastic ovals, and may end up lying sideways instead of pointing up.
 

Lee VanRoss

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Warren I hope you have more sense than to throw felt loaded roofing nails out your window in the hopes of
disabling someone regardless of how dumb they may be. What do you intend to do if it causes a blow out and
they lose control as a result?
Pull them out of the wreckage and knock their teeth out !?
 

Caustic Burno

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Compare it to this.

The Right to Roam is an ancient custom that allows anyone to wander in open countryside, whether the land is privately or publicly owned. In countries such as Norway, Sweden, Estonia and Scotland it has existed as a common right, a defining concept of nationhood, and has only recently been codified into law. Central to all versions of it across Europe is that: 1) there are sensible, listed exceptions and modifications to this right; and 2) this right only comes with strict responsibilities to both the ecology and community of an area.​
The Right to Roam is really just a definition of private property that is different to England. There are still major landowners in Norway, Counts in Sweden, Lords in Scotland who own many hundreds of thousands of acres. Their ownership of the land, however, while it allows them to take rent, mine and make money from the land, does not include the right to exclude every other member of the public. In these countries, the Right to Roam is considered so important to the health and mental well-being of a nation, that it supercedes that peculiarly English stipulation of property: the right to exclude. Instead, every person has a right to explore these vast open spaces, to sleep there, to kayak, swim, climb, ride horses and cycle.​
Right to roam will get you hauled to jail in Texas by the Game Warden.
 
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Warren Allison

Warren Allison

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Warren I hope you have more sense than to throw felt loaded roofing nails out your window in the hopes of
disabling someone regardless of how dumb they may be. What do you intend to do if it causes a blow out and
they lose control as a result?
Pull them out of the wreckage and knock their teeth out !?
No windows on a bike, Lee. Anyone stupid enough to tailgate a biker...twice.... deserves what happens. Re-read what I said. Most of us carry pennies or ball bearings or marbles. When an idiot tail-gates, you just slam a handful down on the road beside you. They bounce up and get on their grills, hood, up under it, etc. Makes a hell of a racket. Most idiots get the message when that happens, and stay off of your a$$. In over 40 years, I had to use the felt washers just twice. Could have a couple of more times before I figured out to carry them. On both of those occasions when I had to do it, I don't reckon they wrecked but don't really care. They were endangering my life and the ole lady's life, and the lives of others in the group by tailgating. A bike can go from 80 to zero in less than a car length. If a biker has to stop fast....or worse, if he goes down for some reason... a car following too close will run over him before the car driver can hit the brakes.
 

callmefence

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No windows on a bike, Lee. Anyone stupid enough to tailgate a biker...twice.... deserves what happens. Re-read what I said. Most of us carry pennies or ball bearings or marbles. When an idiot tail-gates, you just slam a handful down on the road beside you. They bounce up and get on their grills, hood, up under it, etc. Makes a hell of a racket. Most idiots get the message when that happens, and stay off of your a$$. In over 40 years, I had to use the felt washers just twice. Could have a couple of more times before I figured out to carry them. On both of those occasions when I had to do it, I don't reckon they wrecked but don't really care. They were endangering my life and the ole lady's life, and the lives of others in the group by tailgating. A bike can go from 80 to zero in less than a car length. If a biker has to stop fast....or worse, if he goes down for some reason... a car following too close will run over him before the car driver can hit the brakes.

No windows on a bike, Lee. Anyone stupid enough to tailgate a biker...twice.... deserves what happens. Re-read what I said. Most of us carry pennies or ball bearings or marbles. When an idiot tail-gates, you just slam a handful down on the road beside you. They bounce up and get on their grills, hood, up under it, etc. Makes a hell of a racket. Most idiots get the message when that happens, and stay off of your a$$. In over 40 years, I had to use the felt washers just twice. Could have a couple of more times before I figured out to carry them. On both of those occasions when I had to do it, I don't reckon they wrecked but don't really care. They were endangering my life and the ole lady's life, and the lives of others in the group by tailgating. A bike can go from 80 to zero in less than a car length. If a biker has to stop fast....or worse, if he goes down for some reason... a car following too close will run over him before the car driver can hit the brakes.
So do you count the nails or something?? Seems like you'd have to so you could get em all picked up off the road.........
 

Steve123

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This weekend, I took my horses down to a friend's place, to help him him gather, pen and sort some cattle to take to the sale on Monday. He has about 120 head of Corriente cows, that he breeds to either Angus or Brangus bulls every year, This year he had split the difference and used Ultra Black bulls. These cattle are on about 200 acres of old cut-over timber. It is ( or was) overgrown with Kudzu when he put the cows in last January. Broom sage, Johnson grass as tall as my saddle, all kinds of briars and honey suckle is what these cows live on. There is a creek and a pond on the property, and he keeps free choice salt and minerals in the corral. This pasture hasn't ever been seeded with grass, or fertilized or had a bush hog on it. This is our quail and rabbit hunting property. so, we are rounding up these cows, probably around 700 lbs each, with big, black, polled calves nearly as tall as they are! These cows calved in February, so they are right at 6 months old. He only leaves his bulls in for 30 days, and after that he pulls them. He puts in a Corriente bull for cleanup. He gets about 10-12 Corriente calves each year, which is what he wants to do. There were 9 Corriente calves this year, and yeah, they were 3-4 weeks younger than the black calves but they were half the size. 300-350 lbs is my guess.... good size for Corrientes that age. We hauled 50 of these black steers and one bull calf that got missed at castration time Sunday night. They weighed between 500 and 540 lbs! That's pretty damned impressive...700 lbs cows ( all fat as a tick by the way, on sh*t for forage) weaning 540 lb calves.... about 80% of their own weight. They carried the heifers Monday morning , so I didn't see how much they weighed. But he just told me the steers brought $1.46 lowest to $1.58 highest. Heifers were $1.36 to $1.46. The one bull calf was $1.54. The same price as the other black calves did that day, and higher by 10-20 cents than red, white, brindled etc calves did.

There is no way he has more than $350-$400 in these cows...many were closer to $200- $250, depending on when he got them. He has virtually no additional costs in them, except for salt and minerals. When they calved in February, I went down there to rope the calves for castration and ear tagging, and Sunday was literally the first time he had been there since February. There were NO black calves out of commercial Hereford, Braford, Black Baldy, Charolais, Simmental, Gelbiev, Limosine, Wyenoogie or even Angus or Brangus that brought more per pound that day. None from these kind of cows that weaned calves at 6 months at 75-80% of their mommas' weight....with zero feed, hay, medical or TIME costs involved. For what a good cow or heifer of those breeds cost, you can buy 4-5 of these Corrientes, and feed those 4 or 5 for less money than you can another commercial beef cow. and keep 4 or 5 on the same acreage it takes for 1 or 2 commercial beef cows.

IF I ever decide to fool with cow/calf operations again,. then this is exactly what I'd do: Buy these $300 cows that will give me a $700-$750 calf the first year, with zero labor, zero calving problems,. zero vet costs, and virtually zero feed costs. Like Longhorns, Corriente are as heat, disease, insect and parasite resistant as a Brahma, and as cold tolerant as a Highlander.
I just got my Kris Black "Cream of the Crop" sale catalog and was surprised to see that all the bred heifers in the sale were bred to Corriente Bulls. Might start catching on.
 
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Warren Allison

Warren Allison

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@MurraysMutts , is this a barn where they sell in groups? Are these conditioned calves or trailer-weaned calves. I was looking at the prices in the market reports. They are about the same or less as around here where they are not conditioned, and are sold one at a time.
 

MurraysMutts

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@MurraysMutts , is this a barn where they sell in groups? Are these conditioned calves or trailer-weaned calves. I was looking at the prices in the market reports. They are about the same or less as around here where they are not conditioned, and are sold one at a time.
The big black heifers were sold in groups of 5. With the option to take the next 5 at the same price.

If you mean the corriente/longhorn cows, they may or may not be sold in groups. Depends on age and stage bred. Sometimes they will put several together of like kind. Sometimes they will just sell em as singles

I was gonna try and go watch that sale today, but things happened..
 
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Warren Allison

Warren Allison

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The big black heifers were sold in groups of 5. With the option to take the next 5 at the same price.

If you mean the corriente/longhorn cows, they may or may not be sold in groups. Depends on age and stage bred. Sometimes they will put several together of like kind. Sometimes they will just sell em as singles

I was gonna try and go watch that sale today, but things happened..
No, I was wondering about the calves on the market reports, the different weight categories for heifers and steers. Just wondered if this was a place like all of our western friends talk about, selling conditioned caalves in pot loads, the whole ring is a scale and they weigh the group, etc. Or if it was like here..you wean your calves at about 6 mos, or whenever they weigh 400-450 lbs, , they are not conditioned, and they sell and are weighed one at a time
 

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