Warbex

Help Support CattleToday:

JW IN VA

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
1,230
Reaction score
74
Location
West Central Highlands of Va
Anyone else ever use this?
It was a big thing back in the 70s to get rid of cattle grubs early. Worked for horn flies and lice. We could use a half dose for lice if the cattle had been poured in the fall.

Been years since you could buy it.

I guess between it and the ivermectins the heel flies were about wiped out.
 

sstterry

CT Supporter
CT Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
5,934
Reaction score
2,893
Location
Bulls Gap, TN
In the back of my mind, I want to think that it fell out of popularity because it killed birds and fish. Don't count on that though, I will trust what the Vets tell us.
 

Stickney94

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2018
Messages
360
Reaction score
137
Location
SW MN
I remember using it as a kid -- steel can/light green/red lettering -- it appears to have had it's approval pulled in 1989. I can't find a quick article as to why. It can definitely poison birds but not sure if that is why it went off the market.
 

SBMF 2015

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
2,214
Reaction score
2,211
Location
West Central,IL
We used it up until the mid 2000's. Wish I could still get it. Great on lice, worked on grubs, flammable, gave me an instant headache.
Warbex is an organophosphate. They figured out prolonged exposure caused cancer.
 
OP
J

JW IN VA

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
1,230
Reaction score
74
Location
West Central Highlands of Va
I knew they pulled it from production but didn't know why. Ivomec came out about that time so we still had something.
There was another product called Spot On which some used back then, too.
 

faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
730
Reaction score
1,081
Location
NE WY
I remember using it. Neguvon was another. Nasty stuff and it did kill birds. Made our magpies almost extinct. A rancher got some in his snoose can and used it and wound up passing away...they say from Warbex.

The avermectin products can all be used effectively at half dose for lice and grubs.
Some vets say that is the cause of the avermectin products not working as well on internal
parasites. Cattle have built an immunity to it.
 

Lucky_P

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Messages
3,610
Reaction score
931
Location
Western KY
We used it back in the 1970s. Think we still had a few clients who were still pouring it on cows at herd-working time, even into the mid 1980s. IIRC, you had to be careful with it on cattle with Brahman influence.
I have not seen a cow with grubs since about the time Ivomec came on the scene, around 1981.

As to killing birds... that was mainly when folks intentionally laced corn/grain with it to kill nuisance birds, or injected carcasses with it to take out coyotes, dogs, etc. When owls, eagles, hawks, buzzards start dying (and are reported) around carcasses, or from eating smaller birds poisoned by it, the Feds get all up in arms.
Carbofuran (Furadan), an organophosphate insecticide widely used in crop production, has largely taken the place of Warbex as the 'drug of choice' for dastardly folks poisoning dogs. We used to see cases of Furadan poisoning far too frequently at the diagnostic lab - usually targeting neighbor's dogs, but occasionally, when birds of prey were affected by someone purposely contaminating a deer or calf carcass... the Federal Wildlife folks came swooping in, and people have gone to jail &/or received big fine$.

fasterhorses... cattle don't develop 'immunity' to anthelminthics - but underdosing (whether accidentally or purposefully) and 'rotating' dewormers, as practiced by many folks, certainly selects for populations of parasites that are resistant to multiple classes of anthelminthics.
 

sstterry

CT Supporter
CT Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
5,934
Reaction score
2,893
Location
Bulls Gap, TN
fasterhorses... cattle don't develop 'immunity' to anthelminthics - but underdosing (whether accidentally or purposefully) and 'rotating' dewormers, as practiced by many folks, certainly selects for populations of parasites that are resistant to multiple classes of anthelminthics.
What would you recommend as opposed to rotating dewormers and fly control chemicals?
 

Lucky_P

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Messages
3,610
Reaction score
931
Location
Western KY
'Rotation' should not mean switching to a different class of anthelminthics every time you deworm... Veterinarians and Extension livestock specialists of my generation made those sorts of recommendations... and we were wrong!

Read the following article from BEEF magazine.
Ray Kaplan has been at the forefront of trying to manage/reduce anthelminthic resistance.
https://www.beefmagazine.com/animal-health/five-ideas-parasite-refugia

I'll go farther than his recommendation to leave at least 10% of herd 'untreated' (I imagine he's had to temper that recommendation to mollify 'advertisers in these magazines.). I recommend not deworming adult cows. At all. By the time they are 3-4 yrs of age, they should have developed resistance/resilience and have very few, if any, 'worms'., and the few they have are important, with regard to serving as a source of refugia.

I haven't seen an adult cow die due to gastrointestinal nematode parasitism ('worms!') in over 30 years. The macrocyclic lactones (ivermectin class) have been used so widely in the USA that Ostertagia is mostly a non-issue anymore... it's all but extinct on many premises.
 

sstterry

CT Supporter
CT Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
5,934
Reaction score
2,893
Location
Bulls Gap, TN
'Rotation' should not mean switching to a different class of anthelminthics every time you deworm... Veterinarians and Extension livestock specialists of my generation made those sorts of recommendations... and we were wrong!

Read the following article from BEEF magazine.
Ray Kaplan has been at the forefront of trying to manage/reduce anthelminthic resistance.
https://www.beefmagazine.com/animal-health/five-ideas-parasite-refugia

I'll go farther than his recommendation to leave at least 10% of herd 'untreated' (I imagine he's had to temper that recommendation to mollify 'advertisers in these magazines.). I recommend not deworming adult cows. At all. By the time they are 3-4 yrs of age, they should have developed resistance/resilience and have very few, if any, 'worms'., and the few they have are important, with regard to serving as a source of refugia.

I haven't seen an adult cow die due to gastrointestinal nematode parasitism ('worms!') in over 30 years. The macrocyclic lactones (ivermectin class) have been used so widely in the USA that Ostertagia is mostly a non-issue anymore... it's all but extinct on many premises.
But, after years of using the same dewormer, will the parasites develop a resistance that particular class of anthelminthic?
 

farmerjan

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 1, 2016
Messages
4,371
Reaction score
1,952
Location
Shenandoah ValleyVirginia
We seldom worm adult cows. Bought ones we worm on receiving, and give vacc/shots and anything else they might need going through the chute... If an adult cow needs worming we will do it... but it is noted and if it looks like they need it again, they are often culled. I agree with @Lucky_P ... and that is not from any years of learning and studying or training... that is just from general observation. They need to be able to fit your environment. And like kids, if they do not develop resistance from exposure over time, they will be sickly and needy forever.
 

Buck Randall

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
2,284
Reaction score
2,365
But, after years of using the same dewormer, will the parasites develop a resistance that particular class of anthelminthic?
Yes, that's the idea. Use a dewormer until the resistance gets unacceptably high, then switch. By the time you've cycled through the other dewormers, resistance to the original dewormer should have gone down again.
 

Lucky_P

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Messages
3,610
Reaction score
931
Location
Western KY
Except... ongoing studies are showing that once you've selected for a population of worms with resistance to the macrocyclic lactones and benzimidazoles, that resistance doesn't seem to dissipate. Ever.
But, resistance to the nicotinic receptor agonist class (levamisole, pyrantel, morantel) does appear to fade away after 10 years or so.
 

Similar threads

Latest posts

Top