vaccines

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Anonymous

We have been having a lot of our newborn calves die from calf scours. What is the best vaccine for this ,as well as mastitis and respitory. Please respond



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Anonymous

I'm sorry to hear you've been losing your calves.

Besides actual vaccine names, consider first having your vet determine exactly what virus/bacteria/parasite is causing the deaths.

Second, see about sanitizing the area your calves are born/raised in, or moving them to clean ground once you find out what you're dealing with.

Third, when you do vaccinate, make certain you follow all of the manufacturer's directions to the letter. Refrigerate and protect the vaccine from heat and light, don't contaminate your vaccine by sticking used needles into it, give the recommended number of doses in the time frame recommended, and give the vaccine as directed, whether SQ or IM.

If you're dealing with a virus, all you can do is give supportive care, once the above factors have been dealt with. Antibiotics can be effective against bacteria that causes a primary or secondary infection, but not viruses.

As for specific vaccines, we use Cattlemaster 4 (and it's a VERY fragile vaccine once mixed), Scourguard 3KC, a good 8 way, Staybred VLS, and a good pinkeye vaccine on our herd. The vaccines most effective on your herd will vary according to the area you are in and the prevalent diseases in your area.

Look around your place and see if your water supply and/or calving/nursery grounds could be contaminated. Make sure you and others who work with your livestock aren't carrying the disease from animal to animal on your hands, clothing, shoes, syringes, needles, bottles, etc.

Rafter L Murray Greys
 
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Anonymous

> I'm sorry to hear you've been
> losing your calves.

> Besides actual vaccine names,
> consider first having your vet
> determine exactly what
> virus/bacteria/parasite is causing
> the deaths.

> Second, see about sanitizing the
> area your calves are born/raised
> in, or moving them to clean ground
> once you find out what you're
> dealing with.

> Third, when you do vaccinate, make
> certain you follow all of the
> manufacturer's directions to the
> letter. Refrigerate and protect
> the vaccine from heat and light,
> don't contaminate your vaccine by
> sticking used needles into it,
> give the recommended number of
> doses in the time frame
> recommended, and give the vaccine
> as directed, whether SQ or IM.

> If you're dealing with a virus,
> all you can do is give supportive
> care, once the above factors have
> been dealt with. Antibiotics can
> be effective against bacteria that
> causes a primary or secondary
> infection, but not viruses.

> As for specific vaccines, we use
> Cattlemaster 4 (and it's a VERY
> fragile vaccine once mixed),
> Scourguard 3KC, a good 8 way,
> Staybred VLS, and a good pinkeye
> vaccine on our herd. The vaccines
> most effective on your herd will
> vary according to the area you are
> in and the prevalent diseases in
> your area.

> Look around your place and see if
> your water supply and/or
> calving/nursery grounds could be
> contaminated. Make sure you and
> others who work with your
> livestock aren't carrying the
> disease from animal to animal on
> your hands, clothing, shoes,
> syringes, needles, bottles, etc.

IMO the above is very good advice!

If calves are dying, start with a vet!

Linda's vaccine program looked very good, but that is Linda's program based on past experience and likely some imput from her vet. I have heard vet's say that vaccine programs could differ even in the same county, maybe from neighbor to neighbor.

Regardless of how sincere the poster may be or the decades of experience he/she may have, it really seems like a shot in the dark at a very small target to suggest a program without having seen the farm, animals and management level of the producer!

If animals are sick or dying, then her first statement is the most important! Call a vet!

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Anonymous

> Linda's vaccine program looked
> very good, but that is Linda's
> program based on past experience
> and likely some imput from her
> vet. I have heard vet's say that
> vaccine programs could differ even
> in the same county, maybe from
> neighbor to neighbor.

> Regardless of how sincere the
> poster may be or the decades of
> experience he/she may have, it
> really seems like a shot in the
> dark at a very small target to
> suggest a program without having
> seen the farm, animals and
> management level of the producer!

Very true, Phil. And, I did not mean to recommend the poster use the particular vaccine program we use here in rural Utah. I meant it as an example of the number and types of vaccines that might be needed for a typical herd. That's why I added the sentence: "The vaccines most effective on your herd will vary according to the area you are in and the prevalent diseases in your area." Perhaps I should have emphasized contacting a veterinarian to help the poster set up a program for his herd.

Rafter L Murray Greys
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> Very true, Phil. And, I did not
> mean to recommend the poster use
> the particular vaccine program we
> use here in rural Utah. I meant it
> as an example of the number and
> types of vaccines that might be
> needed for a typical herd. That's
> why I added the sentence:
> "The vaccines most effective
> on your herd will vary according
> to the area you are in and the
> prevalent diseases in your
> area." Perhaps I should have
> emphasized contacting a
> veterinarian to help the poster
> set up a program for his herd.

Actually, you did say contact a vet in your first paragraph! I thought your answer was very good and covered several areas or points that needed to be said! I had hoped my comments had been supportive of your comments, not critical!

Phil in MS.

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