• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Vaccinating Calves & vitamin shots

Help Support CattleToday:

M&M Farms

New member
Joined
Mar 15, 2004
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
I was told to give a&d , b-compex, and selenium in the first day or so.
Does this sound right or is there something better.
Thanks
 

Hawk

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2004
Messages
167
Reaction score
0
Location
North East Texas
I guess it depends on who the advice came from. If it was from a good cattle vet who is familiar with your herd, it is probably good advice. If it was something you heard from a less reliable source, maybe not. It has been my experience that cows usually do a wonderful job of raising their babies with a minimum of interference from us. I am generally opposed to giving my animals supplements unless I am convinced that they really need them. A good mineral program and plenty of grass and/or hay will raise most any calf just fine.
 

eric

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 23, 2003
Messages
1,121
Reaction score
0
Location
Tx.......just north of Dallas
You know Hawk, Ive often wondered about that too. Who gives the shots to the calves born out in the wild, doesn't mother nature take care of them pretty much on her own? I have a guy up the road from me who never vaccinates, deworms or anything. His cows dont seem to be any less healthy than my neighbors who spend all this $$ on shots dewormners. Could he just be lucky, or do most folks overprovide for their animals? Reminds me of lawn maintenance, I hardly every fertilize my grass, put out weed killer even less often, and I seem to have less weeds than my neighbors who slave over their lawn yr round.
 

Hawk

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2004
Messages
167
Reaction score
0
Location
North East Texas
Most of what little that I know about beef cattle was learned from a few old ranchers who had made their living for many years running cross bred cattle in Texas. The preferred momma cow was about 1/4 Brahma and 3/4 some beef breed. They would use some very good purebred bulls and produce very nice calves that sold nicely. These old boys made money in the cattle business by watching their costs closely. They didn't mind spending a dollar if it would help them return a profit, but they wouldn't spend a dime if they couldn't see the justification on the bottom line. They were very self sufficient men who could perform their own equipment maintenance, welding, fabrication, fence building, haying, feeding, financial planning, vet work, etc, etc. They would think you were crazy if you suggested calling the vet to perform simple chores such as castration and dehorning. They vaccinated and wormed twice a year and treated any animal that needed attention and left them to their own devices the rest of the time. Calves are born out in the pastures and raised by their mommas generally without any human assistance. They were not worried about having cows that were nice to look at, they were interested in cows that would make them money. Any cows that weren't up to the job were sent down the road. No exceptions and no regrets. These guys and their cattle operations were, and are, a world apart from some of the pampered registered herds and the plush ranch spreads that are common today.
 
OP
M

M&M Farms

New member
Joined
Mar 15, 2004
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
I have small feed lot & 4-H show animals. I was givin the idea that $9.00 worth of shots would improve cattle from good to better. I do agree that cattle are very hardy animals, and a lot of this might not be necessary, but is a few buck worth the time & effort. Is there something else. Should we be content with what we have or what we could have?
 

Hawk

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2004
Messages
167
Reaction score
0
Location
North East Texas
I guess the answer to you question depends entirely upon what your goals are. People that raise show calves generally will spend any amount of money if it will give them an advantage in the show ring (whether it is strictly within the rules or not). If your goal is to maximize your profits by raising a good calf for the least cost, you look at things differently. I cannot control the market price that I get when I sell calves, I can only control my costs. Sale price minus costs equal profit. I will leave it to someone else who is into shows to advise you on your original question. I am all in favor of improving your animals, as long as it improves your bottom line. I have no interest in upgrading the herd just to impress the neighbors.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
Remember that too much selenium will kill them just as quickly as too little (dummy calf syndrome). Your local large animal vet should be ableto advise you on what is actaully necesarry in your particular area. It doesn't cost anything to give him/her/it a call and get a little information. If the vet is a real butthead about it, find another vet.

dun

M&M Farms":25ot8wr3 said:
I have small feed lot & 4-H show animals. I was givin the idea that $9.00 worth of shots would improve cattle from good to better. I do agree that cattle are very hardy animals, and a lot of this might not be necessary, but is a few buck worth the time & effort. Is there something else. Should we be content with what we have or what we could have?
 

TXBobcat

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
782
Reaction score
0
Location
China Spring, TX
Hawk":7nw6vpic said:
Most of what little that I know about beef cattle was learned from a few old ranchers who had made their living for many years running cross bred cattle in Texas. The preferred momma cow was about 1/4 Brahma and 3/4 some beef breed. They would use some very good purebred bulls and produce very nice calves that sold nicely. These old boys made money in the cattle business by watching their costs closely. They didn't mind spending a dollar if it would help them return a profit, but they wouldn't spend a dime if they couldn't see the justification on the bottom line. They were very self sufficient men who could perform their own equipment maintenance, welding, fabrication, fence building, haying, feeding, financial planning, vet work, etc, etc. They would think you were crazy if you suggested calling the vet to perform simple chores such as castration and dehorning. They vaccinated and wormed twice a year and treated any animal that needed attention and left them to their own devices the rest of the time. Calves are born out in the pastures and raised by their mommas generally without any human assistance. They were not worried about having cows that were nice to look at, they were interested in cows that would make them money. Any cows that weren't up to the job were sent down the road. No exceptions and no regrets. These guys and their cattle operations were, and are, a world apart from some of the pampered registered herds and the plush ranch spreads that are common today.

Very well put, I agree 100% Hawk.
 

Latest posts

Top