V the V 2nd opinion please

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Anonymous

As I have mentioned before we are relocating to an old dairy that the previous owner shuttled cows through frequently. I spoke to his vet and was toald the only serious disease problem that he had was BVD. Our cows are all vaccinated in the spring for the normal series including BVD using MLV and in the fall with killed. My question was what would be the smartest thing to do with the cows if he have to bring them over prior to calving and the young calves before before we move them. He seemed to feel that we had petty much done all we could to protect from the problems we might encounter. I asked about vaccinating the calvees before we move them and was told if we did to use MLV on them but he didn't think it would really do all that much more good then what we've already done. Comments/suggestions

thanks

dun
 
OP
A

Anonymous

There are two strains of BVD--cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic. Ensure that your vaccination program contains both strains. Anything pregnant under 145 days that picks it up could potentially have a persistently infected calf, so hopefully they're over that age. Of course, abortion happens to infections over that, so it's not really a great improvement. If possible, I'd disinfect everything possible. BVD will contaminate feeders, barns, etc but I haven't had much problem with dirt. Of course, we generally don't have new herds coming onto infected farms--it's usually infected cattle causing the problem. We also have some pretty long winters. In Canada, Triangle is one product which advertises that it has two strains-and it's a killed vaccine thus safe for anything pregnant. I'd ensure all calves are vaccinated for both strains--if killed, twice a month apart, preferably a month or more before the move for the second....if MLV at least 3 weeks prior to the move. I'd contact an extension agent or the area vet college for more information about which strains etc are in your area and the duration in your soil. Sorry I can't be of more help. V
 
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Anonymous

Big help, thanks a lot. Pretty much spells out what my options are going to be.

dun

> There are two strains of
> BVD--cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic.
> Ensure that your vaccination
> program contains both strains.
> Anything pregnant under 145 days
> that picks it up could potentially
> have a persistently infected calf,
> so hopefully they're over that
> age. Of course, abortion happens
> to infections over that, so it's
> not really a great improvement. If
> possible, I'd disinfect everything
> possible. BVD will contaminate
> feeders, barns, etc but I haven't
> had much problem with dirt. Of
> course, we generally don't have
> new herds coming onto infected
> farms--it's usually infected
> cattle causing the problem. We
> also have some pretty long
> winters. In Canada, Triangle is
> one product which advertises that
> it has two strains-and it's a
> killed vaccine thus safe for
> anything pregnant. I'd ensure all
> calves are vaccinated for both
> strains--if killed, twice a month
> apart, preferably a month or more
> before the move for the
> second....if MLV at least 3 weeks
> prior to the move. I'd contact an
> extension agent or the area vet
> college for more information about
> which strains etc are in your area
> and the duration in your soil.
> Sorry I can't be of more help. V
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> Big help, thanks a lot. Pretty
> much spells out what my options
> are going to be.

> dun we have to vaccinate yearly for BVD, BRSV, IBR, HAMAELPHOULOUS, and redwater. we have neighbors who have dairys and are always bringing cattle in and out and not vaccinating for anything.

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OP
A

Anonymous

We have a complete vaccination program/schedule and vaccinate twice a year, spring and fall. I think that's why the local vet feels we've pretty mcuh covered about all we can. Even the calves get their first vaccinations at spring workup when they are between 2 months and two weeks old depending on their birthdate.

dun
 

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