Unrolling Hay on Wet Ground

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Bright Raven

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Maybe you can do it on frozen ground or dry ground. I put out 2 rolls yesterday after noon. I am using second cutting hay that is stored outside. I left 18 inches ruts just getting the rolls picked up. They are in a row just off the side of the driveway so I only was in mud for a short distance.

There is no way I would even whisper the idea of going out on these steep pastures and unrolling hay. Even with 4×4 drive, it would be a mud toboggan ride to the holler.
 

1982vett

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Bright Raven":1labqrhi said:
Maybe you can do it on frozen ground or dry ground. I put out 2 rolls yesterday after noon. I am using second cutting hay that is stored outside. I left 18 inches ruts just getting the rolls picked up. They are in a row just off the side of the driveway so I only was in mud for a short distance.

There is no way I would even whisper the idea of going out on these steep pastures and unrolling hay. Even with 4×4 drive, it would be a mud toboggan ride to the holler.
You know.....farming and ranching is a “one way fits all” occupation. Now get out their and start unrolling! :lol2:
 

Banjo

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Your area sounds like the Lancaster, Ky. area where all the farms are on a 45 degree angle. Went to a farm equipment sale there a while back and the owner had a JD tractor with duals on to bushhog the pastures...the duals were to help keep from turning over. Looked like there were a lot of good grass on those hillside though.
 
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Bright Raven

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Banjo":1kuqll6d said:
Your area sounds like the Lancaster, Ky. area where all the farms are on a 45 degree angle. Went to a farm equipment sale there a while back and the owner had a JD tractor with duals on to bushhog the pastures...the duals were to help keep from turning over. Looked like there were a lot of good grass on those hillside though.

Yes. Maybe steeper here. There is good grass on these hillsides.
 

ClinchValley

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The axle on our 4x4 tractor is against the ground in places. Looks like its gonna stay warm and rainy through Feb…

It is nice to have the rain though. I'm not complaining…much.
 

bigbluegrass

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Can you set your bales in the fall and then unroll them by hand (push them down the hill)?

For the last 6 years I have fed hay by bale grazing on the side of the hill in KY. I pick the hill with little to no grass or one I have recently cleared trees from in the past year. I set bales in a grid pattern ahead of time, in the fall - when it is dry and the ground is solid. On the steeps hills it is necessary to use blocks on the down hill side of the bales to keep them from toppling and rolling down the hill. This winter I didn't even need to start the tractor to move hay or drive in the mud. I only have an old 2 WD tractor. I move an electric fence and bale ring every couple days, as the cows finish the bales. I use the cheap bale rings, because they are easier to move (lighter). I don't have a huge pile of manure at the end of winter to deal with, it is all out there on the hill.

I will update my post on clearing land from last year and show what it looked like this spring and summer. I thought it turned out well.

When feeding on existing grass, the cows can rut things up pretty good. I have noticed that the first year after feeding hay in an area the grass is pretty stunted. Two years after it starts looking better. I can still see the areas I fed hay on 3-4 years later, because the grass is superior to the areas around it. I sure would not go back to moving hay around in the winter. What a mess!

Your mileage may vary.
 

Bigfoot

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I had an odd number of hay rings. I went yesterday, and bought a hay ring. It seemed like such a waste to rut the field with 4 trips for 7 rolls of hay. I can now make 4 trips to fill 8. The ruts were just killing my soul. That trip with just one roll seemed like such a waste.
 

ClinchValley

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Bigfoot":3owtjsyi said:
I had an odd number of hay rings. I went yesterday, and bought a hay ring. It seemed like such a waste to rut the field with 4 trips for 7 rolls of hay. I can now make 4 trips to fill 8. The ruts were just killing my soul. That trip with just one roll seemed like such a waste.

I've been thinking like this too. Won't come out with just one bale, will stack them in a feeder if need be, but i'm moving two at a time.
 
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Bright Raven

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bigbluegrass":2ec0qcrk said:
Can you set your bales in the fall and then unroll them by hand (push them down the hill)?

Your mileage may vary.

Kenny Thomas provided the same recommendation. I assume you unroll by hand. I would be concerned that I would lose control and they would roll all the way to the creek. Plus, I notice the hay layers do not come loose easily. So the ones that roll down slope may not leave a layer of hay on their course.
 

bigbluegrass

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Bright Raven":l7fme4gf said:
bigbluegrass":l7fme4gf said:
Can you set your bales in the fall and then unroll them by hand (push them down the hill)?

Your mileage may vary.

Kenny Thomas provided the same recommendation. I assume you unroll by hand. I would be concerned that I would lose control and they would roll all the way to the creek. Plus, I notice the hay layers do not come loose easily. So the ones that roll down slope may not leave a layer of hay on their course.

I have not tried unrolling any yet. I set 15 bales on the ridge in a line last fall and will try to unroll them this spring by hand. I figure I could use something like a meat hook to stay on the uphill side of the bale and let it go a little at a time.
 
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Bright Raven

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bigbluegrass":krcp7346 said:
Bright Raven":krcp7346 said:
bigbluegrass":krcp7346 said:
Can you set your bales in the fall and then unroll them by hand (push them down the hill)?

Your mileage may vary.

Kenny Thomas provided the same recommendation. I assume you unroll by hand. I would be concerned that I would lose control and they would roll all the way to the creek. Plus, I notice the hay layers do not come loose easily. So the ones that roll down slope may not leave a layer of hay on their course.

I have not tried unrolling any yet. I set 15 bales on the ridge in a line last fall and will try to unroll them this spring by hand. I figure I could use something like a meat hook to stay on the uphill side of the bale and let it go a little at a time.

Use a square bale hook. That is what I use to turn them.
 

Banjo

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The hay needs to turn in the direction the spiral is turning. If you go the opposite of the spiral they don't unroll as well.
If they are frozen a little, cut a 2 or 3 inch deep cut across the bale. If your on a steep hill and they are turned the right way....they just begin to implode from going so fast.
 

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bigbluegrass":1997vmq2 said:
Bright Raven":1997vmq2 said:
bigbluegrass":1997vmq2 said:
Can you set your bales in the fall and then unroll them by hand (push them down the hill)?

Your mileage may vary.

Kenny Thomas provided the same recommendation. I assume you unroll by hand. I would be concerned that I would lose control and they would roll all the way to the creek. Plus, I notice the hay layers do not come loose easily. So the ones that roll down slope may not leave a layer of hay on their course.

I have not tried unrolling any yet. I set 15 bales on the ridge in a line last fall and will try to unroll them this spring by hand. I figure I could use something like a meat hook to stay on the uphill side of the bale and let it go a little at a time.
3

make sure your Lifeinsuarnce is paid up . A friend of mine got his neck broke 3 years rolling one out of a truck , he was pushing it out and tried to slow it down and as soon as he grabbed ahold of it it flipped him over the top
 

kenny thomas

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Bright Raven":aqu5cp45 said:
bigbluegrass":aqu5cp45 said:
Can you set your bales in the fall and then unroll them by hand (push them down the hill)?

Your mileage may vary.

Kenny Thomas provided the same recommendation. I assume you unroll by hand. I would be concerned that I would lose control and they would roll all the way to the creek. Plus, I notice the hay layers do not come loose easily. So the ones that roll down slope may not leave a layer of hay on their course.
If the hay is rolled dry and not molded it will unroll fine if started the correct way. I set out hay Friday night and just turn the cows into a different pasture each night and push the roll to get it started unrolling. Not even a track from a tractor in my field.
 

JW IN VA

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I unroll almost all of mine.And yes, they do tramp some in and yes, it does cut the ground.I can't go back to square bales as there would be too many and I don't have anyone but me most days.
I try to pick the driest spots and do the best I can.It's not perfect but it works.
I have fed in rings but my driest ground has too many rocks to make clean up possible.I sometimes miss the old days when we made silage.You could back up to a trough and unload.It might be sloppy but they got it all and it was clean.
We did,however, have some scouring calves every year which probably was caused by cows wading in to get fed when it was real wet.Haven't had very many for years.
 
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