Udder/teat sanitation

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Peace

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mild soap and water...give it a minute or so after washing, it will stimulate them "letting their milk down"...if you're really worried about it buy some teat dip, which is/was a mild iodine and dip it after you milk...but I'm not sure that's necessary...
 

Dsth

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when we were in the dairy business, we used an iodine based udder wash mixed in a bucket of hot/warm water. use a clean cloth towel to wash teats. do not dip a dirty cloth back into the mix if you need more than one cloth to clean teats. you can also use a pre milking teat dip that is probably more sanitary if teats are generally clean at milking time.
 

bigbluegrass

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I use baby wipes, basically instead of a rag. If the cows is dirty, I will first use several baby wipes to get her cleaned up. Then I will do a pre-dip (iodine based) and let it sit for a few minutes while I get other things ready, then I clean that off with a baby wipe. After milking I use the same iodine based dip as a post dip. If the cow is clean, I may only use one baby wipe per milking. If the cow is dirty, it might take 4 or 5.
 

farmerjan

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I will use a wash cloth with a little dawn detergent in water for pre milking clean up and massage. Then I use AVEENO hand cream for a after milking softening for the udder. Yeah, people hand cream. I always squirt a half dozen or more squirts out of each teat before collecting for the house. I don't get carried away with the "sanitizing" thing because the cow is usually pretty clean, and a few germs is a good thing for the body's immune stimulation. As long as the cow doesn't lay down for 10-15 minutes after milking, the teat ends will naturally close. I don't use a post dip but not against it. I don't use iodine as I get a rash from it.
A couple of my dairies use peroxide for a pre and post dip. Cheap and easier on the teats than bleach. There are 2 that use a diluted bleach water for pre and then something with emollients for a post dip so as to not cause chapping.
You can strain the milk through a dbl layer of LINEN type kitchen towels... or use a coffee filter... I bought cotton/linen type cheap white table napkins at Walmart for strainers and they work great and you wash and reuse.
 

suzorse

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I use a strainer with milk filters , as even machine milking sometimes hay or a stray hair gets into my pail , also checking for flakes or clumps in the milk , clumps that are rubbery may mean an issue , and if it melts between your fingers it is butterfat , I use an Iodine udder wash , small bucket of hot water with some of the wash added , 1 rag per cow or wipe if dirty never redip , clean rag per cow to dry , strip 5 squirts per teat and attach milker or go to hand milking , if machine milking a post dip is a must but not with hand milking
Suzanne
 

SoilBuilder

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Niacin is cheap and has many health benefits, including anti-inflammatory and improved colostrum...
"Niacin Alleviates Dairy Cow Mastitis by Regulating the GPR109A/AMPK/NRF2 Signaling Pathway" Source:

"How Feeding Nicotinic Acid (niacin) Can Improve Colostrum Quality and Calf Performance"
Source:

 

collegeboundgal

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I take a little tupperware container with a washrag and filled with water and a drop of dish soap to clean. I need to find a fly spray to spritz on right before milking to decrease the tail flicking in my face (I hand milk). On the calf sharing cow I use a lotion to soften the teats and makes milking a little "smoother" since her teats are more calloused and rougher. Teat dip post milking since no calf on the cow I am currently milking. If I am milking the cow that has a calf I forgo the post dip since the calf will start sucking on her immediately anyways. I strain the milk (with milk filters) as soon as I bring it back into the house. Everything I use is seamless stainless steel and glass jars. I do have some food safe containers that will hold (I think) about 1.5 or 2 gallons if I don't have time to use the milk as I am bringing it in.
 

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