types of milk

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Anonymous

Are there any differences between milk produced by dairy cows and the milk produced by beef cows? How does crossbred (beef x dairy) cow milk compare? Thank you

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Anonymous

There are differences between breeds of dairy, as well as differences between dairy to beef and beef breeds. A vast generalization is dairy breeds tend to have lower fat and protein per litre, but produce more milk so that overall they produce more of each per day. They also have lower colostrum concentration. The somatic cells are also different in count, depending on the level of mastitis, generally subclinical. So overall, beef milk is fatter, likely higher protein and has higher concentration of antibodies in the colostrum. Jersey milk is also much higher fat than Holstein. I'm sure if you require more detail, that you can get all the info on the net.
 
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Anonymous

> There are differences between
> breeds of dairy, as well as
> differences between dairy to beef
> and beef breeds. A vast
> generalization is dairy breeds
> tend to have lower fat and protein
> per litre, but produce more milk
> so that overall they produce more
> of each per day. They also have
> lower colostrum concentration. The
> somatic cells are also different
> in count, depending on the level
> of mastitis, generally
> subclinical. So overall, beef milk
> is fatter, likely higher protein
> and has higher concentration of
> antibodies in the colostrum.
> Jersey milk is also much higher
> fat than Holstein. I'm sure if you
> require more detail, that you can
> get all the info on the net. Vicki- Thanks for answering her question. Now mine - does the milk from the cows always have colostrum, or is it only in the milk for a certain length of time. My particular thinking is about the Holstien cows that come through the sale barn with huge bags that hang to the floor. Could these cows nurse two or three newborns and would they have the necessary colostrum. Thanks for your insight.

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Anonymous

Colostrum is only produced precalving, maybe a little in the first couple of days. Unless the milk is definitely colostrum in appearance and you KNOW she just calved, do not depend on there being enough colostrum for any newborn calves. There are colostral replacements available which can supplement these newborns!
 
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Anonymous

Also, the colostrum the cow produces loses quality each hour after calving. So if you collect colostrum from a cow to use on your calves, you should collect it early after calving, based on an article I read. It said, like being important for the calf to receive colostrum asap, it was also important to collect extra colostrum early - even if it was the cows first milking. Not sure of the process, but aging in the bag loses quality. Jeanne
> Colostrum is only produced
> precalving, maybe a little in the
> first couple of days. Unless the
> milk is definitely colostrum in
> appearance and you KNOW she just
> calved, do not depend on there
> being enough colostrum for any
> newborn calves. There are
> colostral replacements available
> which can supplement these
> newborns!

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Anonymous

An attendant problem with those Holsteins with bags to the floor, calves frequently can't get low enough to nurse.

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Anonymous

> Also, the colostrum the cow
> produces loses quality each hour
> after calving. So if you collect
> colostrum from a cow to use on
> your calves, you should collect it
> early after calving, based on an
> article I read. It said, like
> being important for the calf to
> receive colostrum asap, it was
> also important to collect extra
> colostrum early - even if it was
> the cows first milking. Not sure
> of the process, but aging in the
> bag loses quality. Jeanne

Thanks for the info - I really appreciate it.

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Anonymous

Also, even though Holstein cows tend to have large udders, those with "bags to the floor" may be hanging that low simply because the tissue & ligaments supporting their bags has broken down.
 
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Anonymous

Most often, those holsteins at the stock sale are culls..not producing enough to be kept at the dairy. Sometimes they are "bad" cows also...either mastitis prone or some other problem. I bouth a jersey a few yrs ago from a dairy. She was not producing enough milk for them to profit from her, but she did fine for me. I sold her last summer to someone to use as a nurse cow. She raised 3 calves for him. If I were going to buy a milker, I'd check a local dairy first before buying from the stock yard.
 
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