Two Of Our Horses: Peruvian Paso

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Running Arrow Bill

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Here is a photo of our Peruvian Paso brood mare, "RTP Ligeia," and her 3 month old filly, "RAF Chiquita Lara," (*LEA Conquistador X RTP Ligeia). The Peruvians are great pleasure, trail, and ranch monitoring horses with world famous smooth gait which includes a swimming motion of the front legs called "Termino."

ChiquitaLigeia11.jpg
 

dcara

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Nice looking horses Bill. How old and tall is the mare? Looks to be 13H or so. I've given some thought in the past about gettinng a Paso. The couple I've actually looked at seemed to be a bit opinionated. The Paso people I've talked to call it "breo" and said most Pasos are like that. You ever heard of it?
 

fellersbarnoneranch

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Bill, off the subject...In "The Good the Bad and the Ugly" is it a Peruvian Paso (that black that "the Ugly" starts out on)?

That is some kind of flashy smooth horse!
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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Yes my mare is about 14.3 hands, 10 years old. The term "Brio" refers (generally) to a spirit and willingness to please under saddle which is inherited from the Spanish horses (Andalusian, Barb, Friesian, etc.). The Peruvian Paso is generally "unremarkable" as they are standing around in the pasture, except for their long manes & tail. However, when they are being worked in round pen and especially under saddle they come alive and offer their spectacular motion.

They are not unmanageable by any means, they have been bred over many generations to offer a smooth, safe mount that is willing to travel long distances with great conservation of energy. They just like to "GO" once they are under saddle; and, they have a soft mouth.

Don't remember the horse in the movie, fellerbarnone. Saw it years ago, though.

Peruvian Paso is slow to mature and is not started in bit until 3 or 4 years old. Bozal & four reins training (under saddle) at about 2.5 to 3 years old.

One of their famous showy images is that under saddle when you look at their topline and the rider's body, there is very little evidence in up/down movement (there is a "Champaign Class" in shows where the rider carries a filled glass without spilling any--or very little). And, this is done in their normal, collected gait.

Gaits are 100% inherited among pureblood Peruvian Pasos...evidenced hours after birth, as the foal experiments with different gaits and their legs.
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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Yes, the Peruvian Paso has an aire about them, bordering on a little snobbishness, arrogance (Spanish breed influence). They are very responsive and affectionate, on the other hand. Heavy-handed training goes over like a lead balloon with them: They will get their feelings hurt and resist. However, once mutual trust is established you have a very reliable and committed horse.
 

Gale Seddon

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I first saw a Paso Fino last spring at the VA Equine Extravaganza...was very impressed when they did that little 'tap dance' thing...looked like a very comfortable ride, with a whole lot of energy happening!!! We were there with two donkeys (the exact opposite of high energy, LOL!), saw a lot of different breeds I'd never seen before, but would like to see more of those Paso Finos, fascinating!
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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fellersbarnoneranch":2hvra96y said:
For our info Bill, could you give us some differences/similaritites of the Peruvian Pasos and the Paso Finos?

The Peruvian Paso is from Peru following its introduction from the Spanish breeds (Andalusian, Friesian, Barb, Jennet) and has been essentially "Pure" breed over the last several hundred years. The first major introduction in the USA was in the 1950's. In 2002 it was estimated there were about 20,000 registered in the USA, Canada, & Europe with about 15,000 more registered in Peru. They come from three major regions in Peru: Southern, Northern, & Lima haciendas. The Peruvian Paso is the only pureblood horse breed in the World that has "Termino" (a swimming type motion of front legs, originating in the shoulders). This gait is 100% inherited among pureblood PP's and is evidenced shortly after birth.

The Paso Fino is from the Caribbean Island areas and also has Spanish blood. It's gait is short and perhaps "choppy" in appearance; however, they are also smooth riding. If a Paso Fino has "Termino" it is considered a "defect" in their bloodline.

Both horses are small in stature.
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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Ellie May":18znb80n said:
Those are some nice hosses! I have a question, how do they ride? Someone in our area has some for sale and I was looking into them.
Ellie May

The Peruvian Paso is an extremely smooth riding horse. When under saddle (or in gait in the pasture) their topline has very little noticible movement. Their "Termino" motion of front legs and their good reach of back legs produces a very smooth ride in spite of their "awkward" looking 4-beat lateral gait. In this respect, their is a Champaign Show class where rider rides in gait holding a filled champaign glass and little is spilled...rider with most liquid in glass at end wins the entire $$ pot.

The PP has a short back and as such a properly fitting Peruvian Saddle (without horn and high back) is used. A mild bit is used as they have a very soft mouth requiring little reining on part of rider. They "can" be ridden western or english, as well as bareback; however, western saddles do not fit their back properly.

Their general appearance has been said to be "half body, half leg". They are deep bodied with a fine boned structure in legs. However, they are very sturdy horses that do will in all day rides over a variety of terrains. They rarely ever need shoeing.
 

cowgal

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So, Peruvians are essentially "purebreds" and Paso Finos have something else in the wood pile, and don't gait the same? What is done if they exhibit the termino--no register?
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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cowgal":1qhclq29 said:
So, Peruvians are essentially "purebreds" and Paso Finos have something else in the wood pile, and don't gait the same? What is done if they exhibit the termino--no register?

Both the Peruvian Paso and Paso Fino are considered to be distinct and separate breeds. Both breeds have several Spanish horse breeds in their distant ancestry (as do all other livestock breeds have mixtures of animals within their breed, species). After several hundred years of selective linebreeding and outcrossing, BOTH the PP and PF have evolved into two distinct "pureblood" breeds with their own unique characteristics.

I'm not very up on the Paso Fino breed. But, my impression is that if either the PP or PF fail to exhibit the desired characteristics of their specific breeds they would not be considered "desirable" specimens; however, as long as either were purebred to their own breed they would be eligible for registrtion in their respective Associations as a pureblood PF or PP.

Bottomline: It is considered a serious "defect" in conformation, type, or whatever IF the Paso Fino exhibits Termino; or, if the Peruvian Paso FAILS to exhibit Termino. Since these traits are dominant among pureblood PP and PF, either of these defects (respective to the specific breed) would be suspect of either a defective gene popping up; or, evidence of a cross-breeding event.
 
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