twins

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Anonymous

Weve had a set of twins, and the one has his little feet are bent under at the hocks from his position inside mom, and has a hard time standing. Thus, weve had to bottle feed him cause he cant stand to nurse. Would putting little splints on his front and back ankles help? What is usually the out come for a situation like this? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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Anonymous

We always referred to it as bumblefoot, I'm sure there is a clinical name for it but that's what we called it. We never put anything on them. The calf eventually, usually a week or two started walking first on their toes then more and more on the whole foot. A neighbor here puts splints on them and it takes about six weeks for them to get right. Plus, changing the wrappings around the splint and the padding inside is a crappy job that has to be done every few days. We have always tended to leave well enough alone with most things and let ma nature resolve the problem with as little interference from us as possible. Although, when a heifer had twins we did give the smallest calf a bottle for a week or so until the mommas milk really came in.

dunmovin farms
> Weve had a set of twins, and the
> one has his little feet are bent
> under at the hocks from his
> position inside mom, and has a
> hard time standing. Thus, weve had
> to bottle feed him cause he cant
> stand to nurse. Would putting
> little splints on his front and
> back ankles help? What is usually
> the out come for a situation like
> this? Any suggestions would be
> appreciated.
 
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A

Anonymous

It is very common to see this in twins or large calves. It is the tightening of the tendons in the front pasterns? If so, putting PVC type splints wrapped with Vet wrap will help tremendously. You must changed the wraps daily and this is can be a real chore if the cow is protective of her calf. Supplementing the calf with bottled milk is good, but mother's milk is always the best. In addition, you can give both twins an injection of "Polyserum", which with help them to get that extra boost.

Hope this helps, email me if you need anymore help.

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Anonymous

I agree with Dun. The more the calf is forced to use his/her legs, the faster the tendons will stretch. If mom is willing, I would help the calf stand (or drape him over a haybale) and get the calf sucking mom as much as possible. Supplementing with a bottle is great, but he needs to know how to suck mom & mom needs to know he should be sucking. Jeanne
> We always referred to it as
> bumblefoot, I'm sure there is a
> clinical name for it but that's
> what we called it. We never put
> anything on them. The calf
> eventually, usually a week or two
> started walking first on their
> toes then more and more on the
> whole foot. A neighbor here puts
> splints on them and it takes about
> six weeks for them to get right.
> Plus, changing the wrappings
> around the splint and the padding
> inside is a crappy job that has to
> be done every few days. We have
> always tended to leave well enough
> alone with most things and let ma
> nature resolve the problem with as
> little interference from us as
> possible. Although, when a heifer
> had twins we did give the smallest
> calf a bottle for a week or so
> until the mommas milk really came
> in.

> dunmovin farms

Simme Valley in NY
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Anonymous

>The bumble footed fellow is almost walking on all four feet now!!Im so glad, thanks for all reponses. We are just trying to get moms milk production up, he does know how to suck from her as well as his brother, and mom accepts both. Any suggestions on how to up moms milk?? she doesnt seem to have enought for both, we suppliment each calf with a bottle at this point.

Weve had a set of twins, and the
> one has his little feet are bent
> under at the hocks from his
> position inside mom, and has a
> hard time standing. Thus, weve had
> to bottle feed him cause he cant
> stand to nurse. Would putting
> little splints on his front and
> back ankles help? What is usually
> the out come for a situation like
> this? Any suggestions would be
> appreciated.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

If you can feed her away from everybody else, three or four pounds a day of 16% grain may help, along with high quality hay and minerals. She just may not have the genetics to milk heavy enough for both. You may have to keep supplementing the youngsters until they really get into their grass, etc. well. Even then you may have to supplement them, but I would try doing it with grain rather then milk. The tricky part now will be to keep the cow in good enough condition that she starts cycling so she can breed back on time. That is always the problem with twins, the cows loss of body condition.

dunmovin farms

> Weve had a set of twins, and the
 
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Anonymous

>We do have her in the corral with her babies, and 2nd cutting alfalfa/grass mix and minerals. Hopefully this will help. Thanks --

If you can feed her away from
> everybody else, three or four
> pounds a day of 16% grain may
> help, along with high quality hay
> and minerals. She just may not
> have the genetics to milk heavy
> enough for both. You may have to
> keep supplementing the youngsters
> until they really get into their
> grass, etc. well. Even then you
> may have to supplement them, but I
> would try doing it with grain
> rather then milk. The tricky part
> now will be to keep the cow in
> good enough condition that she
> starts cycling so she can breed
> back on time. That is always the
> problem with twins, the cows loss
> of body condition.

> dunmovin farms

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Anonymous

Great to hear that the twins are doing better! That is always good news!

My suggestion for additional supplements is try using a feed additive called "Receiving Chow" it is made by Purina Mills. Feed it about 2-4 pounds once a day. It will keep the cow's condition up and aid in the milk production. Additionally, try adding Alfalfa pellets and Oats in her feed.

Hope you have continued success! Good luck...email me if you have any questions.

Abrego & Abrego Cattle Co.
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