Tractor Tranny Fluid Replacement ?

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Stocker Steve

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The fix ur uppers I buy often have creamy looking fluid. Some even have free water in the bottom of the case. The old timers talk about this kind freezing up in cold weather... :eek:

Does all this water just accumulate after years of condensation, or are there another causes?

Is a simple drain and replace of the hydraulic fluid enough - - or is there some benefit from putting in additives before draining?
 

Kjfred

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I would say for sure it should be warmed up good before draining. I doubt all the moisture would still come out with one flush tho. Never heard of an additive for that purpose but i learn new things all the time. Maybe something alcohol based would absorb moisture?
I would also suspect if there's enough moisture to make it look creamy there is a water source other than condensation.
 

Texasmark

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Unless you have a "hermetically sealed" container, it will, not might, will breathe. The physics of the process is such that the water in the air ingested on the ingestion part of the cycle condenses inside the container and remains. As a result, over time, moisture of significant quantities, depending on what's involved and the time interval, accumulates. If the container is heated adequately for an adequate period of time, the moisture can be driven out the same way it got in. If not it remains.

When I worked in industry, it was a problem with which I had to deal. Usually I went the sealed container route as the application allowed it.
 
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Stocker Steve

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Texasmark":tp1k1v4u said:
Unless you have a "hermetically sealed" container, it will, not might, will breathe. The physics of the process is such that the water in the air ingested on the ingestion part of the cycle condenses inside the container and remains. As a result, over time, moisture of significant quantities, depending on what's involved and the time interval, accumulates. If the container is heated adequately for an adequate period of time, the moisture can be driven out the same way it got in. If not it remains.

You can keep a fuel tank "full", but there is a lot of air space in a tranny housing. I assume a tractor tranny never gets warm enough to drive off moisture, so it just keeps accumulating over the years?
 

Texasmark

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Stocker Steve":35qm9ihy said:
Texasmark":35qm9ihy said:
Unless you have a "hermetically sealed" container, it will, not might, will breathe. The physics of the process is such that the water in the air ingested on the ingestion part of the cycle condenses inside the container and remains. As a result, over time, moisture of significant quantities, depending on what's involved and the time interval, accumulates. If the container is heated adequately for an adequate period of time, the moisture can be driven out the same way it got in. If not it remains.

You can keep a fuel tank "full", but there is a lot of air space in a tranny housing. I assume a tractor tranny never gets warm enough to drive off moisture, so it just keeps accumulating over the years?

I don't see how you guys keep the water out up there. I was out feeding in 32F this morning and when I got back to the barn, it still hadn't reached operating temp and I kept the rpms up to help it to heat up....and that's the engine, tranny was still cold.
 

jltrent

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As costly as tractors are and as expensive as repairs are storing in the big barn baffles me. It is all I can do to keep the equipment going shed stored as staying outside year around I don't see how people keep it going.

Back on the tractor as it has been covered, but as said warmup, let drain overnight, don't go cheap on fluid and keep you fingers and toes crossed that everything is alright. Splitting older tractors and replacing moisture damaged parts can put you underwater in a hurry. I saw an older Ford tractor at auction last year and if it went right I was kindly interested, but after seeing the rotten gear shift boots it couldn't go cheap enough for me.
 

sstterry

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A shade tree mechanic told me to put a gallon of diesel into the tranny, get it warm, and then drain it. Have you seen anything like this?
I found this online I think I would go the Seafoam route.

"You shouldn't put diesel fuel in your transmission. That is an old trick to desludge engine oil; but, trans fluid already has a fluid package that includes cleaners. If you are going to flush the trans you should probably look into products from WYNN's, BG, or sea foam. Wynn's and BG can be purchased from auto dealers. Sea Foam can be found in most parts stores. If you are not going to perfrom an actual flush don't add anything as the cleaners don't need to be left in the transmission and a fluid exchange is about the only way to achieve getting all the cleaner out."
 

chevytaHOE5674

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Diesel "might" loosen up some gunk and get it to drain out but other than that it won't do much. Just pull the drain plug/plugs and let it drain out, replace plug and refill.

If the oil is super milky the new oil may get milky again quickly. So flush again and refill with new oil.

Its expensive... but oil is still way cheaper than bearings, gears, brake linings, clutch linings, etc.
 

ClodHopper37869

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I found this online I think I would go the Seafoam route.

"You shouldn't put diesel fuel in your transmission. That is an old trick to desludge engine oil; but, trans fluid already has a fluid package that includes cleaners. If you are going to flush the trans you should probably look into products from WYNN's, BG, or sea foam. Wynn's and BG can be purchased from auto dealers. Sea Foam can be found in most parts stores. If you are not going to perfrom an actual flush don't add anything as the cleaners don't need to be left in the transmission and a fluid exchange is about the only way to achieve getting all the cleaner out."
You may loosen something w/diesel that didn't come out with the drain, and cause problems later!
Change it 2 or 3 times!
IMO if it's an old tractor, 40-50 or more, the cheapest oil you can find @ Wally World is better than the factor fill of 50 a year-old tractor!!

And then put a better grade of oil in if it makes you feel better!!
 

Atimm693

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Diesel is a pretty poor lubricant and an even worse solvent.

Leaving them outside is the #1 culprit. But it can also come in through implements that sit outside. Water can get into the cylinders and it ends up in the tractor.

I always try to drain off any water before starting anything that's been sitting. It's a lot easier to get out if it's separated and laying in the bottom of the case, rather than running it and emulsifying.
 

chevytaHOE5674

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Many tractor hydraulic oils have additives to keep any water in suspension in the oil. So there will be nothing to "drain off" even after sitting for months.

Case ih "hy tran" is designed to absorb and "carry" up to 2% water.

JD "hy gard" is designed to reject water.

IIRC New Hollands current oil absorbs between 1-2% water as well.
 
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Stocker Steve

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My older tractors are used mostly for haying, so they sit in an open front shed for 9 months of the year.
I don't put a lot of hours on them, but after a couple years the tranny fluid gets milky.
 

chevytaHOE5674

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Condensation will add a lot of moisture to oil. Some can be "burned off" by working the machine hard. But any water held in suspension is stuck there unless you have someone with a good filter cart that can cycle your oil thru.

Oil changes are just a part of owning anything. Pay for oil now or pay for pumps and oil later....
 

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