Tractor over heating

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We had a tractor that would be ok most of the time doing light work. I always kept the radiator blown out and clean. When I would load it up disking or some thing like that it would get hot. Mechanic ended up opened up the water pump and the impeller or blades or what ever you call them were worn, kind of like a boat prop. I guess under enough load it didnt move the water like it should. Replaced water pump and it worked great. Didn't have to clean the radiator as much either. 😄
 
For the radiator I have a set of these. I have good water pressure straight out of the hose, and you can see the gunk coming out of the radiator using the water spray. If it is hay the air spray works best.

 
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For the radiator I have a set of these. I have good water pressure straight out of the hose, and you can see the gunk coming out of the radiator using the water spray. If it is hay the air spray works best.


Those things are flat out impressive. I flush the trash out of my gutters with the water one.
 
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another thing to check.. as your driving it, push the clutch.. does it come to a stop like your pushing the brakes or does it glide to a stop? It might be getting a load from the hydraulic system.. brakes sticking..... etc.
 
I have a 6110M and have to blow the radiator/condenser/coolers out every time I fuel up, or it runs hot. The A/C not putting out cold air is the first clue things are getting plugged. It seems to be a thing with newer tractors, my 7210 can go about all of hay season and never have an issue, which is good because it is a lot harder to blow things out.

I don't understand the desire for manufacturers to try and make tractor hoods smaller at the cost of cutting radiator sizes.
 
I have a 6110M and have to blow the radiator/condenser/coolers out every time I fuel up, or it runs hot. The A/C not putting out cold air is the first clue things are getting plugged. It seems to be a thing with newer tractors, my 7210 can go about all of hay season and never have an issue, which is good because it is a lot harder to blow things out.

I don't understand the desire for manufacturers to try and make tractor hoods smaller at the cost of cutting radiator sizes.
Or put smaller engines in and try to get more HP. One would think the smaller EPA engines would use less fuel, but they guzzle more.
 

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