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TCRanch

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Sure looks like she slipped her calf. Did you notice any mucous prior? Since she follows you around, put cubes in a bowl and take a whiff on the other end while she's eating - ain't no mistaking the smell of a retained placenta. Watch her closely to see if she's a little "off". But, of course, your best bet is to take her in and see what exactly is going on.
 

TCRanch

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There isn't anything as nasty as cleaning a rotten retained placenta! 🤮🤮🤮 and then getting slapped in the face with a bloody, 💩y tail.
I've been dumpster diving before. Didn't get the bloody tail slap but actually threw away my sweatshirt because there was no way that smell was ever coming out.:sick:
 

SBMF 2015

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I've been dumpster diving before. Didn't get the bloody tail slap but actually threw away my sweatshirt because there was no way that smell was ever coming out.:sick:
Hope you found what you were looking for 😵‍💫
Retained placenta, infected scrotums, and neurotic abscess can all test how strong your stomach is. I watched a guy dry heave on the vet. He was tailing a str while the vet opened up an infected scrotum.
 
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kenny thomas

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She hasn't been like this long, @TCRanch

No smell. She just did it yesterday. I'm hoping it clears soon. Otherwise, we will be going to the vet.

All this rotten stinking smelly stuff sounds expensive!
Good chance if it was early it will come out on its own in a couple days.
 

FullCircleWVa

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A minor vaginal prolapse I think. Looks like this:
View attachment 10808
About the size of a baseball or softball.

Lucky_P can probably tell us more
A true Vaginal prolapse is bigger and usually red or pink, but when it first emerges, looks white at least the ones I've seen.
@greybeard would you say that baseball/softball sized “prolapse” is mostly just due to her positioning? Not necessarily indicative that she’ll prolapse when she calves, correct? Reason I ask is I have a heavy bred cow yet to calve and she was doing that on last nights check. I got her up and it went back in like normal
 

greybeard

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Mine calved without a problem other than it was a 99 lb calf and I had to assist. Not a hard pull, just a big old beefmaster calf.
I will say too tho, that when I first saw it with mine she was up walking around, not laying down. Walked a few steps with an arched back which is why I assumed she was ready to calve
 

Nesikep

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That cow needs to do more kegels. Their muscles get stretched and the calf pushes on their vagina when the cow lays down. It usually falls back in when they stand up.
Exercise does help, but I've found it to be strongly genetically predisposed too.. I have some cow families that NEVER have it, and some have been culled to extinction because of it here
 

Nesikep

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@greybeard would you say that baseball/softball sized “prolapse” is mostly just due to her positioning? Not necessarily indicative that she’ll prolapse when she calves, correct? Reason I ask is I have a heavy bred cow yet to calve and she was doing that on last nights check. I got her up and it went back in like normal
I've found it gets worse with age.. as long as it goes back in when she gets up, no immediate worries, but put higher on the cull list
I haven't found it correlates much with uterine prolapse though


Last year I had a heifer eat pine needles and abort at about 4-5 months along, she was just in the corral so I found it.. Bred in May, aborted in October
20201007_183043.jpg
 

TCRanch

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No correlation between vaginal & uterine prolapse. And yes, vaginal tends to get worse and can be hereditary - good reason to cull & not retain heifers from that cow. Also is more common in cows with a high BCS (too fat!). If it becomes a problem prior to calving, you can stitch her up, remove the stitches before she calves and subsequently send her down the road. Uterine prolapse will rarely happen again and generally because the calf is too big &/or she keeps pushing after delivery.
 

Lucky

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We have several with retained placenta every year. Usually only last a few days but have had it still hanging 7 days later. Around day 3 or 4 the buzzards will usually start tugging at it. You don’t want to just yank it out as it could mess up her uterus. You have to get an arm in her and kind of run your fingers were it’s attached to break it loose. I’ve been told mineral deficiency causes this but who knows.
 

gcreekrch

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@greybeard would you say that baseball/softball sized “prolapse” is mostly just due to her positioning? Not necessarily indicative that she’ll prolapse when she calves, correct? Reason I ask is I have a heavy bred cow yet to calve and she was doing that on last nights check. I got her up and it went back in like normal
Those kind of prolapse are hereditary and should not be multiplied. Uterine prolapse are much more impressive and rarely happen twice. Rarely…..
 

wbvs58

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Well, that's one way to put it. Helped put one back in place years ago. Ya just don't have enough hands & arms.
Read the James Herriot books GB for a few tips. I like the one if they are down sit them up and drag the back legs out behind them, makes it down hill then. In my limited experience with them in practice I have done it a couple of times in big cows and it really helps.

Ken
 

gcreekrch

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Read the James Herriot books GB for a few tips. I like the one if they are down sit them up and drag the back legs out behind them, makes it down hill then. In my limited experience with them in practice I have done it a couple of times in big cows and it really helps.

Ken
Tail block works far better.😉
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Mineral deficiencies can cause retained placenta. If the cow is NOT sick, do not manually remove the placenta and do NOT give her any antibiotics.
Natural bugs will eat all the little pieces left inside her and clean her up. Antibiotics will kill the good bugs.
Unless sick, leave them alone.
Never pull it. If dragging large piece, cut it shorter or knot it up.
 

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