• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Thirsty Cow

dirtdoctor

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
62
Reaction score
0
Location
North-Central WV
Hi, since everyone was most helpful with my other question I thought I would ask the experts another one! I bought 2 - 4 y/o bred cows last month due to calve in mid March. They had mixed in well with the others until yesterday. When I went to feed I noticed one of them hanging around some mud puddles, drinking water and not really interested in what I was doing with the hay. This morning I went out to check and she was laying by the water trough as I walked up and rubbed her on the head, she got up, but I had never touched her before except when she was vacc. When I went out to feed tonight she was over by the other water trough laying as I walked over she got up and got a drink, I gave her some sweet feed, after studying the feed she took one bite then turned away and got some more water. Her nose looked wet but she was drinking so I'm not sure if it's runny or if it's just water from the trough. She just seems to stay by herself close to water and she doesn't look like she has the weight the other on has. Any ideas??
 

angus9259

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 2, 2007
Messages
2,834
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan
What's her poop look like?

Are you sure the water is going in? Blockage?

Taken her temp?
 

dirtdoctor

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
62
Reaction score
0
Location
North-Central WV
All the poop around her is firm and makes a pile.
She goes in the shoot tomorrow to be checked out, will sure look for blockages as I check her mouth. Same with the temp.
Thanks for suggesting the blockage check!
 

bandit80

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 4, 2008
Messages
1,099
Reaction score
0
Location
NE Kansas
Watch her drink the water. If she has a blockage, she will attempt to swallow, and the water will just come right back out.
 

angus9259

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 2, 2007
Messages
2,834
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan
bandit80":389a7v4e said:
Watch her drink the water. If she has a blockage, she will attempt to swallow, and the water will just come right back out.

Check for blockage as Bandit suggests. Checking her mouth won't say much. There's 6 feet of hidden terrain between the mouth and stomach.
 

dirtdoctor

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
62
Reaction score
0
Location
North-Central WV
While watching her drink this evening it wasn't really noticable and I was looking for a snotty nose until I realized it just came out of the watering trough :oops: but I will pay more attention to that tomorrow.
Thanks, this is exactly the type of replys I was looking for!
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
Are you by any chance feeding fescue hay nad is the cow from a local area that would have been on fescue in the past?
 

Roadapple

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 14, 2005
Messages
685
Reaction score
0
Location
SW MN
The mouth could tell if she has wooden tongue. But i would also think about slipping in a magnet.
 

Limomike

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2006
Messages
4,132
Reaction score
0
Location
Oklahoma
dun":3ifr5fm6 said:
Are you by any chance feeding fescue hay nad is the cow from a local area that would have been on fescue in the past?
dun, just curious as to why you are asking that question about the fescue?
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
Limomike":1uvlrp7h said:
dun":1uvlrp7h said:
Are you by any chance feeding fescue hay nad is the cow from a local area that would have been on fescue in the past?
dun, just curious as to why you are asking that question about the fescue?

Cows not accustomed to fescue can have serious problems with the endophyte. Besides inhibited cblood circulation it can cause higher then normal temperatures.
That's the reason one of my selection criteria for buying cattle is that they are from a fescue forage system.
 

bandit80

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 4, 2008
Messages
1,099
Reaction score
0
Location
NE Kansas
dun":2f5brerh said:
Are you by any chance feeding fescue hay nad is the cow from a local area that would have been on fescue in the past?


Excellent thought dun. Some cows don't handle the endophyte very well. Increase in body temp from the endophyte could be leading to an increase in water consumption.
 

dirtdoctor

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
62
Reaction score
0
Location
North-Central WV
Now I see why I come here to read post all the time. Yes, Dun, there is a small amount of fescue in the hay and Bandit thanks for explaining why he asked. But now back to the cow, she just came out of the head gate where I found a very warm nose, but since the boys had broken the thermometer (w/o telling) I have no way of really knowing. I looked at her teeth to check for a broken one or if something else was wrong there. Oh and she is able to drink so no blockage, I assume. As to her stool it's turned a yellowish liquid in very small amounts and her nose is runny along with her eyes. She is very mellow as I can just walk up to her in the field; also she hadn't eaten anything I left with her yesterday. Called an "experienced" farmer and he came over to tell me his thoughts (pneumonia) and that he'd recommend 55cc of LA200. Regular vet is out of the state and since I haven't dealt with the other big animal vet (75 miles one way) he said (phone) to go with the LA200 and if she wasn't better to get hold of my regular vet. So that's what I did sure do hope she's feeling better soon. OK so now tell me did I do good or bad.

Thanks for all the help
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
dirtdoctor":1h1dqpfv said:
OK so now tell me did I do good or bad.

Thanks for all the help
You did all you could under the circumstances. As soon as your regular vet gets back I would get some real antibiotics from him. Excenel, Nuflor or one of those types.
A small amount of fescue wouldn;t be causing a problem.
There was a woman that moved to the bootheel from CO and had most of her cows die before the vet finally figured out it was fescue toxicity. As soon as she put the ones she had left on non-fescue hay they did fine.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
11,540
Reaction score
70
Location
Central Upstate New York
She has all the symptoms of running a fever. LA200 "might" help (its best for Pinkeye & footrot). I would rather see you use straight Penicillin G - in VERY HIGH dosage - like triple the recommended since you can't get ahold of "real" antibiotics. Draxxin is drug of choice with the vets around here. One shot works for 7 days. REAL EXPENSIVE!!! but rarely ever need to repeat any treatment.
 

kenny thomas

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Messages
10,066
Reaction score
44
Location
SW tip of Virginia
A very highly thought of purebred breeder from texas a couple of years ago tried to get us to come to a sale he was having on his ranch. I ask if his cattle had ever grazed fescue and he thought I was crazy. Needless to say we did not go. Cows from non fescue areas take a long time to adapt if ever.
Some research shows that if the calves are introduced to fescue by around 18 months the digestive system will adapt pretty soon and they will be ok. Any other thoughts?
 

dirtdoctor

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
62
Reaction score
0
Location
North-Central WV
Well, after returning from a basketball game that we almost didn't go to because of the therometer incident, I went to check on her. She's up and had her nose in the feed box, I'm thinking this is a good sign. Thanks for the encourgement it sure makes a newbie feel better to be able to hear others opinions.
Dun, I just talked to the neighbor that recommended the LA 200, he told me he had a bottle of Nuflor if she's doesn't start acting better. Should there be a waiting period before giving other meds?
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
dirtdoctor":1p1cx2gk said:
Well, after returning from a basketball game that we almost didn't go to because of the therometer incident, I went to check on her. She's up and had her nose in the feed box, I'm thinking this is a good sign. Thanks for the encourgement it sure makes a newbie feel better to be able to hear others opinions.
Dun, I just talked to the neighbor that recommended the LA 200, he told me he had a bottle of Nuflor if she's doesn't start acting better. Should there be a waiting period before giving other meds?
Unless she goes down hill, whatever the LA calls for for the second shot is when I would give herthe Nuflor just to be safe
 

angus9259

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 2, 2007
Messages
2,834
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan
Make sure to check the thread on "no Nuflor for breeding age cattle". Vets are still recommending it even though it's not recommended on the label.
 

dirtdoctor

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
62
Reaction score
0
Location
North-Central WV
Well, this morning she was lying in the same area where she was last night with her head up but she had eaten very little. Wasn't sure what to do so I moved some hay closer to her and went to work. I studied the LA 200 to see when I could administer more but dumb me, could only find the words "single dose". My wife and the other farmer (George) checked her about noon and the report was the same. I stopped by his house on the way home and picked up the bottle on Nuflor, when I got home she was just laying in about the same spot and looking no better, with nothing better to do i gave her 15 g. of probios+ just in case the micro. needed a boost. OK I'm getting worried and scared for the cow now if she's not moving around by tomorrow morning she's getting the Nuflor.
Oh and by the way vets should never go on vacation! I called 4 other vets today but NONE of them work big animals or will even give advice.
 

Latest posts

Top