They Walk Among Us Revisited

Help Support CattleToday:

Running Arrow Bill

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2003
Messages
3,439
Reaction score
2
Location
Texas Panhandle On US 83
Got an email from another breeder who saw this comment (perhaps in a Letter to the Editor? or something) in a newspaper:

"To all you hunters who kill animals for food, shame on you; you ought to go to the store and buy the meat that was made there, where no animals were harmed."

As we all know, there are thousands of naive, stupid, homo sapiens out there that haven't a clue. Those also probably believe their milk, cheese, and other animal products (including eggs) were "made" at the grocery store.

One doesn't have to be raised on a farm to have basic knowledge of from where our food comes. I fault our educational system (starting with parents, etc.) who somehow failed to communicate real and true information to the students. Of course, we must excuse the genetically illiterate and other basic knowledge mutations on some individual's genes...

They walk among us!! And, they VOTE, get a DRIVER's LICENSE, and actually REPRODUCE...

:banana: :roll: :help: :roll:
 

Jogeephus

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
24,228
Reaction score
1
Location
South Georgia
People never cease to amaze me. This is the type person who gets their children to pose with the grizzlies at Yellowstone cause they are so cute. Its a shame the rangers are so diligent in their duties. :(
 

RD-Sam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
1,452
Reaction score
0
Ain't it the truth, nature can't even cull stupidity anymore, we have to pay somebody to protect them.
 

chrisy

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
11,543
Reaction score
2
Location
England United Kingdom
I remember when I was teaching, I asked a class where milk came form and the whole class said Sainsburys, and eggs came from the milkman, amazed me. Not one knew cheese or butter was made from milk, a trip to the local farm and dairy was made, and half of the children had never seen farm animals before, How sad, a lot of these City kids never get taken to the Country side or even the sea side. :(
 

mnmtranching

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
5,061
Reaction score
1
Location
MN
Yep! I've noticed that to. Lots of stupid people out there. Good thing there are smart ones mixed in. :nod:
 
OP
Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2003
Messages
3,439
Reaction score
2
Location
Texas Panhandle On US 83
chrisy":2j8p9z6g said:
I remember when I was teaching, I asked a class where milk came form and the whole class said Sainsburys, and eggs came from the milkman, amazed me. Not one knew cheese or butter was made from milk, a trip to the local farm and dairy was made, and half of the children had never seen farm animals before, How sad, a lot of these City kids never get taken to the Country side or even the sea side. :(


Don't know about the rest of the world, but in the USA our educational systems are about MONEY! It takes a lot of money to run a school...(aka competitive sports, extracurricular activities, expensive buildings so the kids won't feel like they are abused...)

Phenomenal effort is spent on "Teaching The Test" (aka standardized testing at different levels as kids pass through the K-12 system). If a teacher's class scores aren't high enough, the total school's scores aren't high enough and "low scores" (regardless of content of subject matter) relate to school district funding, status, and other stuff. Teachers don't want to leave the classroom for field trips to the "country"; they want to remain in their little safe environment. Fears of lawsuits (God help) if a "child" got injured on a field trip or whatever. That aside, don't I remember that commonsense subject matter (about environment, where food comes from, how to read a road map, etc.) is also found in BOOKS??, certain educational TV programs, and the DESIRE of teachers to teach more down-to-earth survival and awareness subject matter? On the other hand, their lesson plans and curricula are "probably not approved" by their State's educational system or the tunnel visioned School Boards. "Sports, School activities, High Test Scores, School Status (e.g., AA, AAA, AAAA)...priceless... Small town school districts are probably the worst: It is indeed ironic that such a high effort is spent on organized competive sports in school (which probably only account for 0.0001 % of future jobs...

I propose that all for all kids to graduate from the K-12 system that they pass a "test" of practical common knowledge (along with the Three R's) before being allowed to graduate..."Where does meat come from? Where does bread come from? Etc., etc.

Of course, some students haven't a clue about anything (except how to operate a computer game controller or find their way to the closest fast food joint). It is indeed scary that "these" kids are probably the most likely to breed indiscriminately and perpetuate their genetic strain leading to more bottom feeders and welfare leaches.

:welcome: To 2084 (The new Orwellian Society)
 

Lammie

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2006
Messages
7,287
Reaction score
0
Location
TX
You are right, Bill. If it isn't approved curriculum, you cant' teach it. There is very little wiggle room in there, especially in core subjects, math, science, social studies and English, for creative thinking anymore. It takes the fun out of teaching, and most of all, it removes the "teachable moment" when you can expand on a concept and explore it further with students. No more classes outside, no more looking deeper into things that interest students, no more, or very little, hands on. It's a shame in every sense. Totally takes the joy out of teaching.
 

Jogeephus

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
24,228
Reaction score
1
Location
South Georgia
1982vett":hvwt6wlx said:
Long time and big difference from the day when the boys took vo-ag and the girls home-eco.

Our schools still do. Actually, I can't complain about our schools nor the majority of the teaches. School board is a different subject. All they want is federal grant money. And yes, we still pray and say the pledge at our assemblies but I imagine this is costing us some federal money by doing so.
 

chrisy

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
11,543
Reaction score
2
Location
England United Kingdom
I used to teach little ones the first class of school, age 5 rising 6. We had lots of outings with the children. My Daughter and SIL both teach 12 - 18 year olds and are always going on trips with the children. I think our education system is a lot different here, the only time you get to wear a Graduation Gown is when you have finished University. We have Sat's and exams through the year then the main exams GCSE, at the end of year 12, at age 16. If you want to go to Uni you have to stay on at school and take 'A' levels. If not it is out to work or off to Higher Education College.
 

LoveMoo11

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 20, 2008
Messages
1,090
Reaction score
0
Location
Maine
I think they should bring ag back to the classroom-for both boys and girls. Even a lesson on it during the course of a science or social studies class would be better than nothing. But the teachers would have to be educated first, because if not, having them teach children improper facts about agriculture would be just as bad as not teaching them at all. We recently had a tour visit our farm and the kindergartners had actually been learning about cows before their visit, they knew what the udder was and whatnot-better than nothing.
 

VanC

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2006
Messages
5,174
Reaction score
0
Location
East Central Illinois
"To all you hunters who kill animals for food, shame on you; you ought to go to the store and buy the meat that was made there, where no animals were harmed."

Not only does this idiot think that meat is made at the store, they apparently think most hunters kill for food. :roll:
 
OP
Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2003
Messages
3,439
Reaction score
2
Location
Texas Panhandle On US 83
Lammie":125qj6rl said:
You are right, Bill. If it isn't approved curriculum, you cant' teach it. There is very little wiggle room in there, especially in core subjects, math, science, social studies and English, for creative thinking anymore. It takes the fun out of teaching, and most of all, it removes the "teachable moment" when you can expand on a concept and explore it further with students. No more classes outside, no more looking deeper into things that interest students, no more, or very little, hands on. It's a shame in every sense. Totally takes the joy out of teaching.

Agree Lammie! Our USA educational system is sicko! I haven't been inside a K-12 school for 50+ years (except when I taught some night classes for Adults in Horticulture and stuff). It's a good thing I'm not a teacher because I would teach the "approved" stuff and insert analogies, examples, parallels, commonsense, practical stuff, and other "good" stuff also. I might eventually get found out...duh...so be it...there are always other jobs around...lol. I have taught a number of credit courses in Colleges and Universities where I didn't have to submit lesson plans, but just "follow the book" and use as many related materials as you saw fit. In the higher education setting issues such as "student retention and recruiting to one's program area" are important as well as getting good evaluations from students and/or possibly co-worker faculty members. On the other hand if "everyone makes A's B's and C's in higher education" then the professor is probably too lenient on tests and grading. Also, if the professor has too many D and F students, well...either you are not teaching or you have a bunch of dumb students...decision is usually that of your Department Head...lol. I always liked to grade on the "curve"...after all, the "real world" is on a Normal Distribution Curve...right? A few really bright and functional people, a whole bunch of people in the middle, and a few really dumb and stupid people out there...lol.

We can't teach certain historical facts, classic literature and books, and other "unapproved" stuff because we might OFFEND some small minority kid (or) offend their parents. Even the "approved" curricula details on any given subject can be easily "modified" to suit the biases and prejudices of any given teacher. Yes, we have some stupid and naive teachers who probably squeezed by their teacher education program in college (as are some doctors, lawyers, etc., etc.) with a "C" average or so.

I'll shut up for now...lol... ;-)
 

Workinonit Farm

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2004
Messages
7,157
Reaction score
12
Location
Ctrl Virginia
I once met a guy, in another state, who did not know that milk came from cows :shock: . He didn't believe me when I told him. He thought it was made at a factory and that the reason for using cows in advertisements was a marketing thing. :roll: He was almost 20 years old.

On one of our wedding anniversaries my husband had gone to a local florist to get me some roses and the girl behind the counter couldn't believe that that date was our anniversary (Sept.11). My husband explained that we had gotten married in 1993. She didn't put it together. She was still shocked. So he told her that the wedding was in 1993, not 2001. She still was shocked that we would have gotten married on that date. Finally the manager (a much older woman) came out from the back and gave the girl a more detailed explanation. She finally got it. And yes, she was a highschool graduate. :roll: .

I could go on and on.

Katherine
 

chrisy

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
11,543
Reaction score
2
Location
England United Kingdom
We have a curriculum that has to be followed but it also takes into account field trips. ie Farms, museums, seaside, archaeology and a day at the zoo, or safari park. At our local school the children who are in year 5, age 10, are off on a trip to Calais in France for the day, it only takes 45 minutes by ferry to get there, and a hour by coach to get to Dover for the crossing.
I can be in Paris from my home quicker by train, than I can get up to my Daughters in the North of our Country. :? and it's cheaper, go figure.
Do you not have vacations with the children? Where a group of teachers give up their time and take the year group on a holiday somewhere?
 

Lammie

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2006
Messages
7,287
Reaction score
0
Location
TX
Sometimes, but not a lot. It takes time from teaching for the test. And teachers nowadays have training in the summertime, so that they can teach to the test. And let us not forget summer school. We had summer school for the first time this year at our campus and we had about a third of the students sign up, some because they wanted to get ahead on credits but mostly because students are trying to make up classes they've failed. And it is free, including transportation, so that's a better deal than you can get at any other district. I know schools that charge two hundred dollars per semester in summer. We are doing two semesters. And the number of credits needed to graduate is increasing every four years. My son will need 26 and the next group after he graduates will likely need 28. It was 24. Not that there's anything wrong with that. I say get all the education you can while it is still free.
 

dieselbeef

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
5,821
Reaction score
0
Location
myakka city fl
have ya seen the latest study that says fish feel pain....they beestung their lips and they dug em into the gravel so they must hurt..then the hooked htrs to their sides and fried em til they were actually cooked the meat and the one w/o the htrs didnt swim as fast as the ones that did so it must be hurtin em..it was on msn somehwere...wish i had the money for that study and so what if they do i still gotta eat

they actaully wanna change the name from fish to ..get this...sea kittens or water kittens :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
 

showing71

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2009
Messages
688
Reaction score
0
LoveMoo11":3fxy7xoy said:
I think they should bring ag back to the classroom-for both boys and girls. Even a lesson on it during the course of a science or social studies class would be better than nothing. But the teachers would have to be educated first, because if not, having them teach children improper facts about agriculture would be just as bad as not teaching them at all. We recently had a tour visit our farm and the kindergartners had actually been learning about cows before their visit, they knew what the udder was and whatnot-better than nothing.
Around here, the FFA groups, some collegiate groups like block and bridle, and a few ag related businesses have gone and talked to various grades about ag. The trouble is, most of the kids know what it is already. And the big schools where it needs to be done at are too far away.
 

Latest posts

Top