Thank you vets

Help Support CattleToday:

A veteran is someone who, at one point in hes or her life, wrote a blank check made payable to the UNITED STATED OF AMERICA, for an amount of up to and including their life.

Thanks to them all.
 
D2Cat":1b5oqbyh said:
A veteran is someone who, at one point in hes or her life, wrote a blank check made payable to the UNITED STATED OF AMERICA, for an amount of up to and including their life.

Thanks to them all.
Too Narrow of a view... don't forget our allies.
My uncle was a Captain in the Australian Army and was a Japanese P.O.W. during WW II
He met and later married my aunt who was serving as a Red Cross nurse in the hospital where he was recovering.

I thought of him today when I saw TV ad for the Honda Memorial Day Sale. I am biased and it rubbed me the wrong way.
But not as much as it would have him. He hated Japs with the white hot passion of 1000 suns for their horrific treatment
of prisoners and the murder of civilians in China that he witnessed. They are now both long gone.
But that Honda ad today for their Memorial Day Sale just felt wrong to me.
 
Thank You :tiphat:

As I read somewhere you know we have lost our direction when we pay a man more
to put on a helmet to guard a football than we pay a man to guard our freedom.
 
was a Japanese P.O.W. during WW II
Son of a Butch my father was also. 3.5 years.
He was the only one in his Battalion that survived the Bataan Death March.
It makes you wonder if your uncle and my dad ever crossed paths. They were strong men.
 
Had an Uncle on the USS Nevada Dec 7, 1941 all the others served
in the other theaters with most being in the Pacific. Had one Marine Uncle that made beach landings
Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. He was the one that started my love affair with the 1911.
One was in the battle of Coral Sea and the Mariana Turkey Shoot. Only had one Army uncle that went in
D Day +1,Dad was in the Atlantic and Mediterranean campaigns along with Korea.
 
http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-war ... fit&page=1


Baroff, 90, finds himself startled when people learn of his war record and say, as Americans often do to soldiers these days, "Thank you for your service."

"You never, ever heard that in World War II. And the reason is, everybody served," he said.

In Baroff's view, today's all-volunteer military has been robbed of the sense of shared sacrifice and national purpose that his generation enjoyed six decades ago. Today's soldiers carry a heavier burden, he said, because the public has been disconnected from the universal responsibility and personal commitment required to fight and win wars.

"For us, the war was over in a few years. The enemy surrendered and were no longer a threat," he said. "For soldiers today, the war is never over; the enemy is never defeated." The result, he added, is "a state of perpetual anxiety that the rest of the country doesn't experience."


Agree or not, it's something to ponder on this weekend.
 
Son of Butch":1x293031 said:
D2Cat":1x293031 said:
A veteran is someone who, at one point in hes or her life, wrote a blank check made payable to the UNITED STATED OF AMERICA, for an amount of up to and including their life.

Thanks to them all.
Too Narrow of a view... don't forget our allies.
My uncle was a Captain in the Australian Army and was a Japanese P.O.W. during WW II
He met and later married my aunt who was serving as a Red Cross nurse in the hospital where he was recovering.

I thought of him today when I saw TV ad for the Honda Memorial Day Sale. I am biased and it rubbed me the wrong way.
But not as much as it would have him. He hated Japs with the white hot passion of 1000 suns for their horrific treatment
of prisoners and the murder of civilians in China that he witnessed. They are now both long gone.
But that Honda ad today for their Memorial Day Sale just felt wrong to me.
Anybody that has not read the book UNBROKEN needs to do so. It is the true story of Soldiers in Jap prisoner of war camp. Also the spiritual side of forgiveness.
 
Since so many are taking this opportunity to thank a vet..........

Took me a lot of years to come to some realizations..

I see posts all over the internet that begin with "Have a happy Memorial Day"
Does anyone ever come up and wish anyone else a "Happy Anniversary" of your loved one's death? No, of course not--(for instance) there's nothing happy about the anniversary of the day your parents passed away.
But, I have learned to understand, and accept the accolades of gratitude people tend to express to living veterans on Memorial Day, and I certainly don't get angry about it.

One of the "problems" with Memorial Day is far too many well meaning people equate it with Veteran's Day--or even the 4th of July. I don't really think it is intentional, but it has been a very long time since this country has lost hundreds or thousands of it's troops--it's sons and daughter, fathers and mothers in battle every week--where the gold stars were in windows all up and down the street. I also inevitably see someone say this day and Veteran's Day have been hijacked, that they've become nothing more than a reason for commercialism on a large scale--"Memorial Day Sale!" I may make some people upset over this, but I'm going to say it anyway.


I think this hallowed day should be a combination of both somber reflection and joyous celebration. We do think about those we lost, those friends that didn't come home, mourn their deaths to whatever degree we each feel is due, but we also should celebrate their lives, what they did, and the fact that (at least in recent times) they did it of their own free will--and died doing what they loved to do--or at least did it with a purpose. I lost some good friends, I remember the day each died, but I also remember all the days and nights before that. Their laughter, smiles, their stories of home, girlfriends, cars and what they were going to do with their lives when it was time to go home. I've never been to a single funeral, where the preacher DIDN'T say "We're here to celebrate the life of......" and that's what we should do on this day as well as remember their sacrifice.

We should also celebrate that just as we have a nation with folks of this caliber in it, that we also have a nation of civilians, that keep the country strong while we are away doing our nation's work, and build and staff the schools and hospitals that that will care for and teach the children of those who didn't make it back, and care for the spouses, parents, and loved ones of those who made the ultimate sacrifices. I have come to understand, that it takes 2 to tango--one to do the dance on foreign shores, and a willing partner to keep a strong and vibrant economy and something good for us to come back to. Jobs, so when it's time to take that uniform off for the last time, there's another work uniform for ya to step into. And somebody has to grow the wheat, and raise the beef chicken, pork and turkey and veggies that are in those c-rats and MREs, and make the bullets, & build the vehicles and aircraft and ships and the electronics--and milk the cows so that veteran can sit down and savor that first glass of cold real milk again. To build the cars and trucks those young guys and girls are going to want to buy as soon as they get home and settled in. Someone really does have "keep those home fires" burning, to welcome the folks back, to keep and hold that "home to come home to" because that's really why our forces go to fight, for what's back here.

I flew over Danang almost every day and on a little hill above the big air base, was a tank farm that provided the jet fuel for the planes at Danang and by tanker truck, to the helicopters at my base 15 miles to the south. On the sides of those tanks was one word, in big letters. ESSO.My father worked at the Humble/Exxon refinery in Baytown Texas, and I couldn't help but think he had helped make that JP5 that we used everyday, and took a picture of those tanks and sent in home in a letter. "Thanks Dad, you make our job possible".

--When you are in combat, it's not just your loved ones you miss most--it's the whole enchilada, the parades, the bbqs, the ice cream, and even the all the sales, with the bunting and the flags and all the hype. I well remember Memorial Day, 1971. I and the last of our squadron was scheduled to fly out of Danang on June 1, and thought--"Man, if I could have left a little earlier, I could make Memorial Day, have some of my mother's ice cream, and watch the parade". My squadron mates and I talked about all the things we would do, had done back before we left CONUS, and it's a combination of all the things that make up American life that we missed--even the Memorial Day sales and gatherings. My friends that went home in flag draped coffins and body bags wouldn't want us to think of it any other way.

So, this day, or any other, when you are inclined to "thank a veteran" to give him that verbal or typed 'pat on the back' don't forget to reach back and give yourself one as well. You earned it.
 
Greybeard you made an excellent post.
I was in a discussion with a retired Army man sometime back and all he could see or talk about was how important the military was. I tried to tell him that while the military was certainly important for the defense of the country that the work of many others was also critical.
The educator, the clergy, the scientist, certainly the farmer, etc. etc. etc.

Some of my earliest memories are of the WW11 years. My father was in the Merchant Marine transporting supplies to the armed forces abroad, dodging Japanese war planes and German submarines. My Grandfather tilled the soil with a plow and mule as well as working in a plant making artillery shells. My grandmother helped him at home preparing produce for market, "putting up" canned food and so forth.
My mother kept a dairy going-milking cows by hand morning and evening, as well as trying to keep me corralled. They did these things while bearing the anxiety wondering if each trip out if my father would return.
So everyone did what was needed that they could do. I think my family sort of represented the attitude and efforts of the nation.
They took life as it was in stride, as it should be.
Again, thanks for a very good post.
 
Thank you for that post Greybeard. I tend to get pretty morose when I stop and think about the sacrifices made for our freedom but your outlook makes me want to celebrate and revel in it.
 

Latest posts

Top