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"Graze" thistle or cockleburs???

Maybe we use those terms differently or something, but I've never seen thistle or cockleburs be grazed... ever. I suppose it might happen if a desperate cow is enclosed on dirt for two or three weeks with some of those weeds in the enclosure, but as long as there is any suggestion of grass they will ignore those particular weeds.
This spring my late calving cows ate the flowers off the bull and Scotch thistles on the hill. 14 cows on 250 acres with a decent crop of crested wheat grass and about 4 or 5 other grass species. Cows and thistles are gone now but there is still grass left over.
 
I am the same way. So much easier to move them slow and quiet on horseback than on foot, and I NEVER allow a 4-wheeler, side by side, or damned dogs in a pasture with my cattle. Especially with Brahmas. I bought 8 Brahma heifers, coming 2 yr old, a couple of weeks ago. I have them in a 15 acre pasture with a Jersey nurse cow and 5 more beef cows. 2nd evening I had them, I saddled up and rode out to them...just sat my horse and watched them, and talked to them for a while. Then I would ride in and out of them at a slow walk, watching to see if they got nervous. All this week, every evening I can ride up to each one, and spray it with fly spray from my hand-help pump sprayer, and they don't move away. The gentlest bulls I have ever known were all Brahmas. Most broke to lead, and 3 or 4 of them over the years, you could sit on, ride, etc.

I noticed the horse in your avatar. How many do you have? What do you do with them? I like the palominos, buckskins, anmd sorrels with all the chrome, but my favorite color of all, is bay with no white markings. I guess I am dull! LOL

You can not go wrong with buying a couple of Hereford, Braford or f1 Br x Herf cows. Let someone else fool with bringing a heifer's first calf into the world. If you can find these cows bred to a pb Angus bull, that would be ideal. If not, breed these cows to one. Reg. or at least pb so you know it is homozygous for black. The black baldy or super black baldy calves will sell near the top...heifers or steers...and they will finish well for your freezer. Herefords are known for being the best momma cows, and they have a reputation for being the most docile of the beef breeds.
My avatar is a picture of my Mustang. He is an awesome horse! Love him to death and has never let me down on anything that I have asked of him.
 
Don't go buy a Brahman bull. They will require high level, experienced, cattle handling and can really get some one hurt, especially those with physical limitations. They are generally not small farm, family, animals.

Nothing wrong with a Beefmaster X Gert but don't get hung up on a breed as both of those can be very pricey to get qood quailty. Most of your main stream cattle breeds will do fine in you area and dont rule out commercial, crossbred cattle. A little ear, 3/8, 1/4, 1/8 should all work and is more than enoung ear. Buy cattle like equipment, find some one in your area with a good operation and buy from them. Those cattle are likely working there and are adapted to that area. I see a lot of red cattle there like red angus, hereford, etc. They can all go back to a Black bull to top the market.

Just remember when you go to buy, especially if you have kids, make sure you get in and try to handle the cattle. Make sure they are acclimated to kids and not aggressive towards them because they don't know what they are. Make sure you can move them. If you are going to be on foot, make sure the cattle can be moved on foot and haven't been worked horseback their whole lives.

How they act toward you and your family's operation is far more important than a breed.
I got another question for the group here. When using someone else's bull for breeding, is it customary to take the cows to the bull or bring the bull to the cows? Do the bull owners charge for using their bull and what is an average price for using their bull? Thanks!
 
I got another question for the group here. When using someone else's bull for breeding, is it customary to take the cows to the bull or bring the bull to the cows? Do the bull owners charge for using their bull and what is an average price for using their bull? Thanks!
This is just an example that is online and is pretty typical of this area. Go down to Bull Lease Agreement.

 
My avatar is a picture of my Mustang. He is an awesome horse! Love him to death and has never let me down on anything that I have asked of him.
I have told this story before but you are new enough to have missed it. One of the neighbors has a mustang he rides a lot. Back when he first got the horse he was gathering cows up Dark Canyon. That is about 10 miles from the nearest anything (my house). He jumped a bear. The horse just took off chasing the bear biting at it. He didn't know who to be the more scared of, the horse or the bear. The horse has since had lots of wet saddle blankets and has mellowed considerably.
 
I got another question for the group here. When using someone else's bull for breeding, is it customary to take the cows to the bull or bring the bull to the cows? Do the bull owners charge for using their bull and what is an average price for using their bull? Thanks!
How many cows will you have, @Tumbleweed@23 ? Most of the time, when you are breeding a number of cows, the bull comes to you. We keep a herd of 100-120 Cioriente cows, and we breed them to polled,. black bulls. We used to want a tight calving schedule, so we would put 5-6 bulls in with them. We got bulls from my partner's brother, and the bulls came to us and we kept them in our pastures. Last year, I had 2 dairy nurse cows that I wanted bred to a Brahma bull a friend and neighbor had, and we carried the cows to his place. @Brute 23 posted a link to a website of an operation that is in the bull leasing business. Here is another one. Don't know how far this place is from you, but if you go top it, you will see the price they get for leasing bulls is about the same as the one Brute posted, and their trich testing policy is about the same.. They have 2 categories.. Bulls for sale, but you can lease any of them for $300 a month, and a category Bulls leased out, but you can buy any of these. https://www.jjcattleco.com/catalog?...gory]=35&sort[0][c]=lot_number&sort[0][d]=asc
 
I have leased a bull the last couple of years from a guy up the road 8 miles from me. He usually has quite a few breeds to choose from and charges me $150 per month, 3 month minimum. I tell him what breed I want, he pens them and I pick him up. When the bull is done, I just drop him off in the same catch pen I picked him up in. Great deal for me. I just bought a polled Hereford bull calve that should be ready by February. Might not be leasing a bull anymore. I bought a 4 year old horned Hereford as well. I've gone from no bulls to 2 bulls in the past 3 weeks.
 
I have told this story before but you are new enough to have missed it. One of the neighbors has a mustang he rides a lot. Back when he first got the horse he was gathering cows up Dark Canyon. That is about 10 miles from the nearest anything (my house). He jumped a bear. The horse just took off chasing the bear biting at it. He didn't know who to be the more scared of, the horse or the bear. The horse has since had lots of wet saddle blankets and has mellowed considerably.
I know what the neighbor was thinking! I've wanted to start penning and sorting with him, but when the cattle don't move or go in the wrong direction, he reaches out to bite them. This is not allowed in competition. He can nudge them, but NOT bite them. He hasn't got this part down yet. But I still love him.
 
How many cows will you have, @Tumbleweed@23 ? Most of the time, when you are breeding a number of cows, the bull comes to you. We keep a herd of 100-120 Cioriente cows, and we breed them to polled,. black bulls. We used to want a tight calving schedule, so we would put 5-6 bulls in with them. We got bulls from my partner's brother, and the bulls came to us and we kept them in our pastures. Last year, I had 2 dairy nurse cows that I wanted bred to a Brahma bull a friend and neighbor had, and we carried the cows to his place. @Brute 23 posted a link to a website of an operation that is in the bull leasing business. Here is another one. Don't know how far this place is from you, but if you go top it, you will see the price they get for leasing bulls is about the same as the one Brute posted, and their trich testing policy is about the same.. They have 2 categories.. Bulls for sale, but you can lease any of them for $300 a month, and a category Bulls leased out, but you can buy any of these. https://www.jjcattleco.com/catalog?page=1&pageSize=24&search=&filter[category]=35&sort[0][c]=lot_number&sort[0][d]=asc
Thank you!
 
I know what the neighbor was thinking! I've wanted to start penning and sorting with him, but when the cattle don't move or go in the wrong direction, he reaches out to bite them. This is not allowed in competition. He can nudge them, but NOT bite them. He hasn't got this part down yet. But I still love him.
When he first got him it was not a good idea to go within 10 feet of him front or back. A person could get kicked, or bit. I still wouldn't walk up behind him. He does bite cattle but this isn't a competition. It is just cowboys and cattle men sorting the cows.
 
When he first got him it was not a good idea to go within 10 feet of him front or back. A person could get kicked, or bit. I still wouldn't walk up behind him. He does bite cattle but this isn't a competition. It is just cowboys and cattle men sorting the cows.
That's what I'm shooting for. My own cows and calves, and no will dock him for biting. He is very gentle and everyone that knows him loves him. He will probably be my last horse and we've been a lot of miles--just riding. Did a few sorting clinics, just for fun, I'm told that he is very cow savvy. I just hope that I don't never have to rope off him!!!!
 
How many cows will you have, @Tumbleweed@23 ? Most of the time, when you are breeding a number of cows, the bull comes to you. We keep a herd of 100-120 Cioriente cows, and we breed them to polled,. black bulls. We used to want a tight calving schedule, so we would put 5-6 bulls in with them. We got bulls from my partner's brother, and the bulls came to us and we kept them in our pastures. Last year, I had 2 dairy nurse cows that I wanted bred to a Brahma bull a friend and neighbor had, and we carried the cows to his place. @Brute 23 posted a link to a website of an operation that is in the bull leasing business. Here is another one. Don't know how far this place is from you, but if you go top it, you will see the price they get for leasing bulls is about the same as the one Brute posted, and their trich testing policy is about the same.. They have 2 categories.. Bulls for sale, but you can lease any of them for $300 a month, and a category Bulls leased out, but you can buy any of these. https://www.jjcattleco.com/catalog?page=1&pageSize=24&search=&filter[category]=35&sort[0][c]=lot_number&sort[0][d]=asc
Thank you for the link. Good looking heifers and bulls. Seems to be reasonably priced. Thanks again!
 
My avatar is a picture of my Mustang. He is an awesome horse! Love him to death and has never let me down on anything that I have asked of him.
I feel that cattle will get used to a dog they are familiar with if you use the same process as introducing them to a horse. Over the years we have had plenty of pretty good cow dogs. The problem with most people and their dogs with cattle is they never really get a good handle on the dogs so the dogs just start running cattle. That issue really stems with people not the dogs.
 
I know what the neighbor was thinking! I've wanted to start penning and sorting with him, but when the cattle don't move or go in the wrong direction, he reaches out to bite them. This is not allowed in competition. He can nudge them, but NOT bite them. He hasn't got this part down yet. But I still love him.
that can be a hard problem to fix. Long ago I had a Mr San Peppy son and he would just savage one if given half a chance and you would never want to leave him in a pen with a cow over night
 
I feel that cattle will get used to a dog they are familiar with if you use the same process as introducing them to a horse. Over the years we have had plenty of pretty good cow dogs. The problem with most people and their dogs with cattle is they never really get a good handle on the dogs so the dogs just start running cattle. That issue really stems with people not the dogs.
That's with every thing. It's not the horse, sxs, atv or dogs fault.. it's the DA operating all them that causes problems.

Some one who understands how to work cattle can jump on any of those and make the best out of it.
 
"Graze" thistle or cockleburs???

Maybe we use those terms differently or something, but I've never seen thistle or cockleburs be grazed... ever. I suppose it might happen if a desperate cow is enclosed on dirt for two or three weeks with some of those weeds in the enclosure, but as long as there is any suggestion of grass they will ignore those particular weeds.
There's things I haven't seen too, and I've made a bigger circle than most. I'm not entirely sure how cattle determine what to eat and what to avoid. There are actually quite a few plants which cattle not only used to eat, but that ranchers depended on for winter feed, which they avoid now. I think part of it is the amount of supplements we purchase, and part of it is stockmanship.

It struck me as ludicrous when I first heard of Kathy Voth training cattle to eat weeds. Not
"Graze" thistle or cockleburs???

Maybe we use those terms differently or something, but I've never seen thistle or cockleburs be grazed... ever. I suppose it might happen if a desperate cow is enclosed on dirt for two or three weeks with some of those weeds in the enclosure, but as long as there is any suggestion of grass they will ignore those particular weed
 

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