Texas Longhorn Cattle Processing Results

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Running Arrow Bill

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For information to other Longhorn Breeders and comparison to Commercial Cattle.

Here are our own results of slaughter of our Longhorns:
  • 1. Number of cattle involved: 9
    2. Live weight ranges: 644 to 1670 lbs.
    3. Animals: 4 Bulls, 3 Steers, 2 Cows.
    4. Average Weight All Animals: 963 lbs.
    5. Average Hanging Weight All Animals: 503 lbs.
    6. Average Packaged Weight All Animals: 289 lbs. (excluding 1610 and 1510# bulls)
    7. Average Live Weight to Average Hanging Weight Percent: 52.9%
    8. Average Live Weight to Average Packaged Weight Percent: 36.9% (excluding the 2 bulls)
    9. Average Package Weight to Average Hanging Weight Percent: 60.3% (excluding the 2 bulls)

All of the above animals were "natural grass fed". The "Best" processed beef was from animals between 12.5 and 18 months of age. The "wildest tasting meat" was from bulls and cows between 4.9 and 10.7 years of age (hamburger only processed) the 2 bulls noted above were sold, but we sampled the meat and didn't have the info on the number of pounds packaged) . We did not process any head, heart, liver, testicle, or ribs. The oldest animal (bull aged 10.7 years old) turned out to be about 98% lean for hamburger and was too lean for my tastes. I prefer not more than 92 to 95% lean in packaged hamburger.

Recommendation:

In slaughtering & processing a grass fed Texas Longhorn, process the animal between 12 and 18 months maximum for best taste, tenderness. Best steak cuts include tenderloin, ribeye, T-Bone (or NY Strip), and sirloin which are the most expensive cuts at the supermarket and provide you with the most value on your slaughtered animal. Most other cuts should be turned into hamburger. Based on this, we have realized between $1,000 and $1,500 in packaged beef for our use (based on going supermarket prices for grass fed beef). Plus, we retain the skull/horn package to be processed/preserved by our Taxidermist for sale to a customer (going rates for such units between $250 and $500 for horns under 60" total).

Just for anyone's information and comments!
:)
 

chippie

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Thanks for posting this. It is good to know. I hadn't really thought about the added bonus of the skull.
I would like to try longhorn beef someday.
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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chippie":3g7bt69j said:
Thanks for posting this. It is good to know. I hadn't really thought about the added bonus of the skull.
I would like to try longhorn beef someday.

Good girl! LOL!

Depending on the length and twist of the LH skull/horns unit, some are selling upwards of $750. or so. Those are finished prices. For shipping, the horns are cut off little past the poll and re-assembled with screws or pins. The Taxidermist does this. Otherwise, it would cost a small fortune to ship a large rack, with adequate padding, via UPS, etc.

We're members of the Texas Longhorn Cooperative (there is email address and phone numbers on their website). Their website is www.txlonghorncoop.org and they use a USDA certified processor. The Coop headquarters is in Rice, TX. The processor is Huse Processing in Malone, TX. The Coop has several USDA approved labels for their beef products. They are getting their ducks in a row to sell/ship meat products online. We at RAF would like to be able to sell online under their label (they've done several of our cattle for their program); however, there is the "Chain Of Custody" issue from liability issues that we are not sure about and don't want to get sued by some irrate nut who mishandled or mis-cooked their beef and got sick. There are also the Dept of Ag issues that I'm not really up to dealing with all the regulations, inspections, etc. that comes with selling food products...guess I'm too old to take extra chances in life...lol.
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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talldog":9z1wxb4z said:
Hey Bill---Send me a couple of those Porterhouses and me and the wife will try em out !!! :tiphat: :tiphat:

LOL...thanks!

Wish I could :) We've got 3 freezers (dang). We keep the T-Bone, NY Strip, Sirloin (steak & roasts), Rump Roasts, Ribeye, Tenderloin, and about 1/3 of our pounds in ground beef (we eat a lot of GB by choice). Our processor also does several packages of chuck and arm roasts which we put in the Crock Pot and cook in onion gravy mix, green peppers, onions, carrots, and potatos. We don't keep any ribs since neither of us are that into ribs.

I might add that we are a member of the Texas Longhorn Cooperative which handles USDA/FSIS labeled Longhorn Beef in a variety of cuts, including sausages, etc. You can go to their website for more information: http://www.txlonghorncoop.org
 

talldog

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Running Arrow Bill":2fpy7h4b said:
talldog":2fpy7h4b said:
Hey Bill---Send me a couple of those Porterhouses and me and the wife will try em out !!! :tiphat: :tiphat:

LOL...thanks!

Wish I could :) We've got 3 freezers (dang). We keep the T-Bone, NY Strip, Sirloin (steak & roasts), Rump Roasts, Ribeye, Tenderloin, and about 1/3 of our pounds in ground beef (we eat a lot of GB by choice). Our processor also does several packages of chuck and arm roasts which we put in the Crock Pot and cook in onion gravy mix, green peppers, onions, carrots, and potatos. We don't keep any ribs since neither of us are that into ribs.

I might add that we are a member of the Texas Longhorn Cooperative which handles USDA/FSIS labeled Longhorn Beef in a variety of cuts, including sausages, etc. You can go to their website for more information: http://www.txlonghorncoop.org
Had 2 Grass fed longhorn ribeyes thursday night---If the Lord made anything better---He kept it for Himself !! :tiphat:
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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Running Arrow Bill":ghov5nu7 said:
For information to other Longhorn Breeders and comparison to Commercial Cattle.

Here are our own results of slaughter of our Longhorns:
  • 1. Number of cattle involved: 9
    2. Live weight ranges: 644 to 1670 lbs.
    3. Animals: 4 Bulls, 3 Steers, 2 Cows.
    4. Average Weight All Animals: 963 lbs.
    5. Average Hanging Weight All Animals: 503 lbs.
    6. Average Packaged Weight All Animals: 289 lbs. (excluding 1610 and 1510# bulls)
    7. Average Live Weight to Average Hanging Weight Percent: 52.9%
    8. Average Live Weight to Average Packaged Weight Percent: 36.9% (excluding the 2 bulls)
    9. Average Package Weight to Average Hanging Weight Percent: 60.3% (excluding the 2 bulls)

All of the above animals were "natural grass fed". The "Best" processed beef was from animals between 12.5 and 18 months of age. The "wildest tasting meat" was from bulls and cows between 4.9 and 10.7 years of age (hamburger only processed) the 2 bulls noted above were sold, but we sampled the meat and didn't have the info on the number of pounds packaged) . We did not process any head, heart, liver, testicle, or ribs. The oldest animal (bull aged 10.7 years old) turned out to be about 98% lean for hamburger and was too lean for my tastes. I prefer not more than 92 to 95% lean in packaged hamburger.

Recommendation:

In slaughtering & processing a grass fed Texas Longhorn, process the animal between 12 and 18 months maximum for best taste, tenderness. Best steak cuts include tenderloin, ribeye, T-Bone (or NY Strip), and sirloin which are the most expensive cuts at the supermarket and provide you with the most value on your slaughtered animal. Most other cuts should be turned into hamburger. Based on this, we have realized between $1,000 and $1,500 in packaged beef for our use (based on going supermarket prices for grass fed beef). Plus, we retain the skull/horn package to be processed/preserved by our Taxidermist for sale to a customer (going rates for such units between $250 and $500 for horns under 60" total).

Just for anyone's information and comments!
:)


Those numbers are not worth a flip. I am glad I do not raise longhorns especially for freezer beef or I would be losing a tremendous amount of money.
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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S&WSigma40VEShooter":36k10j0f said:
Running Arrow Bill":36k10j0f said:
For information to other Longhorn Breeders and comparison to Commercial Cattle.

Here are our own results of slaughter of our Longhorns:
  • 1. Number of cattle involved: 9
    2. Live weight ranges: 644 to 1670 lbs.
    3. Animals: 4 Bulls, 3 Steers, 2 Cows.
    4. Average Weight All Animals: 963 lbs.
    5. Average Hanging Weight All Animals: 503 lbs.
    6. Average Packaged Weight All Animals: 289 lbs. (excluding 1610 and 1510# bulls)
    7. Average Live Weight to Average Hanging Weight Percent: 52.9%
    8. Average Live Weight to Average Packaged Weight Percent: 36.9% (excluding the 2 bulls)
    9. Average Package Weight to Average Hanging Weight Percent: 60.3% (excluding the 2 bulls)

All of the above animals were "natural grass fed". The "Best" processed beef was from animals between 12.5 and 18 months of age. The "wildest tasting meat" was from bulls and cows between 4.9 and 10.7 years of age (hamburger only processed) the 2 bulls noted above were sold, but we sampled the meat and didn't have the info on the number of pounds packaged) . We did not process any head, heart, liver, testicle, or ribs. The oldest animal (bull aged 10.7 years old) turned out to be about 98% lean for hamburger and was too lean for my tastes. I prefer not more than 92 to 95% lean in packaged hamburger.

Recommendation:

In slaughtering & processing a grass fed Texas Longhorn, process the animal between 12 and 18 months maximum for best taste, tenderness. Best steak cuts include tenderloin, ribeye, T-Bone (or NY Strip), and sirloin which are the most expensive cuts at the supermarket and provide you with the most value on your slaughtered animal. Most other cuts should be turned into hamburger. Based on this, we have realized between $1,000 and $1,500 in packaged beef for our use (based on going supermarket prices for grass fed beef). Plus, we retain the skull/horn package to be processed/preserved by our Taxidermist for sale to a customer (going rates for such units between $250 and $500 for horns under 60" total).

Just for anyone's information and comments!
:)


Those numbers are not worth a flip. I am glad I do not raise longhorns especially for freezer beef or I would be losing a tremendous amount of money.

Sorry! Some people seem to find fault with anything other than their own things. Regardless of what you think, our Longhorn meat works for us and one animal fits in our freezer which lasts us for a year. The Longhorn people are not trying to "match" the "commercial" cattle people or what they get when they slaughter one or sell it to someone else. For us (and some others) we know where our beef comes from and that it has not been pumped full of steroids, hormones, and antibiotics. We like the taste and the results of ourcattle. :cowboy:
 

cypressfarms

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talldog":2ahpd123 said:
S and W---What's your Breed ????


Good question; could it be the elusive BS breed?

RAB, hats off to ya for posting your results. Despite what some seem to think, Longhorns fill a niche market. Why hate them? There should be plenty enough love for all cattle breeds. If you want to hate something, hate chicken (just joking, ofcourse)
 

alacattleman

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cypressfarms":2877me2q said:
talldog":2877me2q said:
S and W---What's your Breed ????


Good question; could it be the elusive BS breed?

RAB, hats off to ya for posting your results. Despite what some seem to think, Longhorns fill a niche market. Why hate them? There should be plenty enough love for all cattle breeds. If you want to hate something, hate chicken (just joking, ofcourse)
wish that were true, id still have some brahman
 

TexasBred

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RAB, thanks for the post....throw one of those roasts in the crock pot. I could be there easily by lunch tomorrow. I'll bring some good homemade sourdough bread for "sopping". ;-)
 

cowmaker

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That's good information. Would like to try a longhorn in the future, now I have a general idea of what to expect.
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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alacattleman":2tbirfa8 said:
cypressfarms":2tbirfa8 said:
talldog":2tbirfa8 said:
S and W---What's your Breed ????


Good question; could it be the elusive BS breed?

RAB, hats off to ya for posting your results. Despite what some seem to think, Longhorns fill a niche market. Why hate them? There should be plenty enough love for all cattle breeds. If you want to hate something, hate chicken (just joking, ofcourse)
wish that were true, id still have some brahman


Simmental and sim angus
 
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