texas long horn horn

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Dyann

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This is from http://www.itla.com, the web site for the International Texas Longhorn Association. This would imply most cattle breeds have Longhorn influence.. but my personal answer is YES.. try eating some, you will enjoy it. Also here is link.. a study done by the Oregon University of LH crosses in the beef industry http://www.itla.com/ScientificStudy.htm

The cattle of the world, regardless of their wide and diverse body types and color patterns, are believed to originate from Bos indicus (the humped cattle of Asia) or Bos taurus (the wild cattle of Europe). Annals of history trace the movement of African cattle accompanying the Moors to Spain and their evolution into many cattle types. On the voyages of Christopher Columbus, the Spanish first brought long-horned cattle to the Americas in 1493. Descendants of these ocean voyagers were the first cattle population in North America.

The English, in colonizing North America, brought their native cattle in 1623, and as they moved west so did their cattle, pulling wagons and plows and providing milk. In 1821, cattle of North Carolina origin began to intermingle with the Spanish and English cattle. American Indians had developed their own strains of cattle from the Spanish and English strains.

Mexico, Texas, and what was then the Louisiana Purchase became the major blending pot for the evolution of this history-making Texas Longhorn breed of cattle. So old-timers contend the big horns, speckled colors and body types were derived from importation to the States out of the Longhorn Herefords of England. Others believe the blue and roan speckled stock reflected early Durham (shorthorn) introductions. The Spanish influence was represented by drab, earth tone colors.

Although "Mexican" cattle of the long horned variety provided the basic strain, historian J. Frank Dobie documented that an infiltration of cattle of mongrel American blood contributed to the evolution of the Texas Longhorn. Dobie estimated the Texas Longhorn evolved as 80 % Spanish influence and 20% mongrel influence. Thus, the Texas Longhorn was created, imported to North America from many different routes, defined and refined by nature, tested by the crucible of time and the elements.

Through the mid-1800s, these range-rugged, big horned cattle multiplied without the help of man. Traits were genetically fixed, and as a result of survival of the fittest, resulted in ecologically adapted bovine families with extremely good heath, fertility, teeth, disease resistance, and soundness of body and limb. They multiplied by the millions. In 1876, an estimated 1000-head breeding herd was introduced into southern Alberta, Canada. By 1884, these cattle were estimated to have multiplied to 40,000 head with multiplication and importation.

A national convention of cattlemen in St. Louis in 1884 made plans for a national cattle trail right-of-way from the Red River north to the Canadian border, but they were thwarted when Congress failed to pass the bill. After this, the great trail drives began to dwindle as deeded, fenced property and rapidly developing civilization cluttered the trails. In 1890, the United States Department of Agriculture estimated the nation's cattle population at 60 million head, mostly containing percentages of Texas Longhorn Blood.

In the early 20th Century, purebred cattle breeds from Europe and Asia became available to fit the desires of early ranchers. The foundation stock of introduced breeds such as Hereford, Shorthorn, and Angus were bred up to purebreds in this country from a native Longhorn base. Because of the great mothering ability of the Longhorn and the popularity of this "breeding up", pure Longhorn blood was practically bred out of existence.

By the dawn the 20th Century, candles, had been the chief source of light for nearly 2000 years. Tallow, the main ingredient in candles is obtained by rendering animal fat. Soaps, lubricants and cooking also required tallow. "Hide and Tallow" companies, as early beef processing plants were known, were a major industry in the early days of the industrial revolution. Meat was mostly an economic by-product. The demand for the tallow and hides was the driving force of the cattle business. Cattle genetics required selecting for the heaviest tallow-producing animals. It is no wonder that the naturally lean Longhorn, with 80% less renderable tallow than the English breeds was not in demand. As a result of this high percentage lean carcass, the Texas Longhorn came close to extinction.

By 1930, much open range was fenced, and southwestern cattle barons zeroed in on their favorite breeds of fat cattle. However, the historic Texas Longhorn was the time tested choice of some serious producers. Although later trading occurred between Longhorn producers, six unique strains were selectively perpetuated by private ranch families before 1931. Several early producers were instrumental in providing Longhorn genetics when the United States Government realized the near extinction of these creatures. The government herd, established in 1927 at the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, Cache, Oklahoma, was to become the seventh of the preserved Texas Longhorn families. These family genetics established in the early thirties and before are still maintained by family members and friends. Today producers of Texas Longhorns either raise their favorite family bloodline in a pure state or mix and select combinations of several family bloodlines.
 

Jake

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If you mean beef as is Laura's Lean Beef or Jerky steaks it's great we won't buy another one to finish out. We'll stick with our own cattle for beef from now on.
 

Dyann

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The problem most people have with Longhorn meat, is they dont know how to cook it. The steaks for example, you dont fork them to death while cooking.. dont fork them at all. You sear them on both sides and then reduce the heat and cook them slower. This is because LH meat is not oozing with fat.. and putting fork holes in the meat or cooking too fast just does not work. After I started eating this lean meat, the other stuff just makes me gag... cant handle the greasiness of it. I guess to each his own.. :D
 

dun

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It's all preference. I don't fork them at all. For a one inch steak, 2 minutes on one side, one minute on the other equals perfection.
I've never had one of the ultra lean cuts that's tender enough to eat when prepared RARE, some people say raw, but that's another personal preference.

dun


Dyann":1noxvc6i said:
The problem most people have with Longhorn meat, is they dont know how to cook it. The steaks for example, you dont fork them to death while cooking.. dont fork them at all. You sear them on both sides and then reduce the heat and cook them slower. This is because LH meat is not oozing with fat.. and putting fork holes in the meat or cooking too fast just does not work. After I started eating this lean meat, the other stuff just makes me gag... cant handle the greasiness of it. I guess to each his own.. :D
 

D.R. Cattle

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I personally like Choice grade (some fat) and cut the steak 1 3/4 to 2". Never poke with a fork. Season with Lawry's. Minced garlic or Montreal seasoning optional. Multitude of marinade options if preferred (do this a day before cooking). Sear hard on both sides then lay the steak aside. 2 Coronas later the steak is done to medium/ medium rare perfection. Let the steak "rest" after removing from grill. Drink one more Corona. Steak is ready to serve. 3 Coronas left in the 6 pack for future grillout.
 

BLACKPOWER

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D.R. Cattle":3coeaisk said:
I personally like Choice grade (some fat) and cut the steak 1 3/4 to 2". Never poke with a fork. Season with Lawry's. Minced garlic or Montreal seasoning optional. Multitude of marinade options if preferred (do this a day before cooking). Sear hard on both sides then lay the steak aside. 2 Coronas later the steak is done to medium/ medium rare perfection. Let the steak "rest" after removing from grill. Drink one more Corona. Steak is ready to serve. 3 Coronas left in the 6 pack for future grillout.

Why is it with people like you that have to drink a beer that unless you drop limes into smells like the south end of a north bound skunk? Then it's one of the most expensive beers.
 

Frankie

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Dyann":j3bharh4 said:
In the early 20th Century, purebred cattle breeds from Europe and Asia became available to fit the desires of early ranchers. The foundation stock of introduced breeds such as Hereford, Shorthorn, and Angus were bred up to purebreds in this country from a native Longhorn base. Because of the great mothering ability of the Longhorn and the popularity of this "breeding up", pure Longhorn blood was practically bred out of existence.

That's ridiculous. Here's the link to OK State University's cattle breeds site:
http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/cattle/

If you take time to read the Angus section, you'll find this:

"The First Angus In America. When George Grant transported four Angus bulls from Scotland to the middle of the Kansas prairie in 1873, they were part of the Scotsman's dream to found a colony of wealthy, stock-raising Britishers. Grant died five years later, and many of the settlers at his Victoria, Kansas colony later returned to their homeland. However, these four Angus bulls, probably from the herd of George Brown of Westertown, Fochabers, Scotland, made a lasting impression on the U.S. cattle industry."

"Early Importers and Breeders. The first great herds of Angus beef cattle in America were built up by purchasing stock directly from Scotland. Twelve hundred cattle alone were imported, mostly to the Midwest, in a period of explosive growth between 1878 and 1883 . Over the next quarter of a century these early owners, in turn, helped start other herds by breeding, showing, and selling their registered stock."

I don't doubt that some Angus included Longhorn blood at one time. But the Angus Association has never approved "breeding up." The breed here in the US was established by importing purebred, registered cattle. By using all the tools available to them, the Association has maintained the breed as pure as possible. Today we use DNA to identify cattle, if necessary. And to be used in an AI program or to be flushed, the animals must be DNA tested.

I also suggest that the Longhorn breed didn't nearly go extinct because of breeding up. Longhorns nearly went extinct because they don't fit the requirements of modern ranching and beef production to the extent that other breeds do.
 

txag

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Frankie":erykqano said:
Dyann":erykqano said:
In the early 20th Century, purebred cattle breeds from Europe and Asia became available to fit the desires of early ranchers. The foundation stock of introduced breeds such as Hereford, Shorthorn, and Angus were bred up to purebreds in this country from a native Longhorn base. Because of the great mothering ability of the Longhorn and the popularity of this "breeding up", pure Longhorn blood was practically bred out of existence.

That's ridiculous. Here's the link to OK State University's cattle breeds site:
http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/cattle/

If you take time to read the Angus section, you'll find this:

"The First Angus In America. When George Grant transported four Angus bulls from Scotland to the middle of the Kansas prairie in 1873, they were part of the Scotsman's dream to found a colony of wealthy, stock-raising Britishers. Grant died five years later, and many of the settlers at his Victoria, Kansas colony later returned to their homeland. However, these four Angus bulls, probably from the herd of George Brown of Westertown, Fochabers, Scotland, made a lasting impression on the U.S. cattle industry."

"Early Importers and Breeders. The first great herds of Angus beef cattle in America were built up by purchasing stock directly from Scotland. Twelve hundred cattle alone were imported, mostly to the Midwest, in a period of explosive growth between 1878 and 1883 . Over the next quarter of a century these early owners, in turn, helped start other herds by breeding, showing, and selling their registered stock."

I don't doubt that some Angus included Longhorn blood at one time. But the Angus Association has never approved "breeding up." The breed here in the US was established by importing purebred, registered cattle. By using all the tools available to them, the Association has maintained the breed as pure as possible. Today we use DNA to identify cattle, if necessary. And to be used in an AI program or to be flushed, the animals must be DNA tested.

I also suggest that the Longhorn breed didn't nearly go extinct because of breeding up. Longhorns nearly went extinct because they don't fit the requirements of modern ranching and beef production to the extent that other breeds do.

hereford & angus are both associations that allow no percentage cattle to be registered.
 

Frankie

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I thought Hereford was started the same as Angus, but didn't take time to research it. Thanks for the info...
 

Ellie May

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BLACKPOWER said:
D.R. Cattle said:
I personally like Choice grade (some fat) and cut the steak 1 3/4 to 2". Never poke with a fork. Season with Lawry's. Minced garlic or Montreal seasoning optional. Multitude of marinade options if preferred (do this a day before cooking). Sear hard on both sides then lay the steak aside. 2 Coronas later the steak is done to medium/ medium rare perfection. Let the steak "rest" after removing from grill. Drink one more Corona. Steak is ready to serve. 3 Coronas left in the 6 pack for future grillout.

Why is it with people like you that have to drink a beer that unless you drop limes into smells like the south end of a north bound skunk? Then it's one of the most expensive beers.


I don't drink beer I'm under aged! :roll:
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Interesting reading. I reckon Angus & Longhorns are both here to stay, but for distinctly different reasons.

I don’t have a dog in this fight but a few items come immediately to mind after reading Dianne’s post and Frankie’s response:

If Grant really was the first to import Angus, in the 1870’s, then I guess you could say the earlier post from Dianne was incorrect when it made reference to Hereford, Shorthorn and Angus importation in the early part of the 20th century – it would of course be the later part of the 19th century. Perhaps the passage from Dianne’s source should have read something like “in the early part of the 20th century and the later part of the 19th century purebred Angus stock became available to fit the needs of literally all rank & file commercial ranchers rather than being limited to the wealthy and those with close ties to the original importers” ???

As to “breeding up” --- what do you suppose Grant bred those four bulls to in 1873 and the next few years? Surely he didn’t just feed them until the later importation of Angus cows. Maybe all were bred to straight Herefords or Shorthorns already in America, but I rather doubt it. Is it not very likely that there was a good bit of F1 breeding to Longhorn or similar type cattle and then again to their progeny before the later importation of sufficient numbers of purebred Angus cows?

I imagine the current AAA set of rules are quite a bit more restrictive than was the case in the late 1800’s and the early 1900’s. If my memory serves me correctly it wasn’t until 1889 or 1890 that the earliest form of the AAA adopted the black only rule, but I imagine that by that time there could have quite a large number of cattle that were solid black and polled, but that had been bred up from other breeds including Longhorns.

Have a nice weekend all --- Arnold Ziffle
 

la4angus

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Anonymous":qwyy31ax said:
Interesting reading. I reckon Angus & Longhorns are both here to stay, but for distinctly different reasons.

I don’t have a dog in this fight but a few items come immediately to mind after reading Dianne’s post and Frankie’s response:

If Grant really was the first to import Angus, in the 1870’s, then I guess you could say the earlier post from Dianne was incorrect when it made reference to Hereford, Shorthorn and Angus importation in the early part of the 20th century – it would of course be the later part of the 19th century. Perhaps the passage from Dianne’s source should have read something like “in the early part of the 20th century and the later part of the 19th century purebred Angus stock became available to fit the needs of literally all rank & file commercial ranchers rather than being limited to the wealthy and those with close ties to the original importers” ???

As to “breeding up” --- what do you suppose Grant bred those four bulls to in 1873 and the next few years? Surely he didn’t just feed them until the later importation of Angus cows. Maybe all were bred to straight Herefords or Shorthorns already in America, but I rather doubt it. Is it not very likely that there was a good bit of F1 breeding to Longhorn or similar type cattle and then again to their progeny before the later importation of sufficient numbers of purebred Angus cows?

I imagine the current AAA set of rules are quite a bit more restrictive than was the case in the late 1800’s and the early 1900’s. If my memory serves me correctly it wasn’t until 1889 or 1890 that the earliest form of the AAA adopted the black only rule, but I imagine that by that time there could have quite a large number of cattle that were solid black and polled, but that had been bred up from other breeds including Longhorns.

Have a nice weekend all --- Arnold Ziffle

Arnold
Are you implying that the Reg. Angus cattle of today are bred up from the shorthorn, hereford and longhorn. Certainly George Grant did not keep the imported bulls around and feeding them until other Reg. Angus cows
were imported to breed them to. Certainly, they were bred to other breeds
to improve the over all quality of the other breeds plus the longhorns, IF the bull was tall enough to mount and breed the longhorn cow.
These offspring were considered improved commercial cattle and as the off spring was bred back to Angus bulls, the quality just kept improving.
As Registered Aberdeen Angus cows and heifers were imported into the USA Registered ANGUS bulls were bred to them and the offspring was
registered and was able to keep the breed pure. There was not a bunch of wealthy men ready to breed to anything for 3 to 4 generations and then say that they had purebred cattle and also register them in an association as being purebred. This Is how about 95% or more of all these continental or exotic breeds were developed in this the USA.
As far as the beef goes, REG. ANGUS, Reg Hereford, and Reg Shorthorn
are pure. The other so called breeds are a composite of at least one other breed and sometimes of two, three or more different breeds. Many are crossed with dairy breeds.
 

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