Texas Emergency Order Issued to Restrict Movement of Deer from Breeding Facilities Where CWD has Been Detected

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Lee VanRoss

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Monitor any watering places as time permits. It is not uncommon for deer to die within a quarter mile of water when CWD is prevalent.
 

M.Magis

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LOL Spreading faster? It's been around for decades and it's rarely found even when they test a high percentage of deer.
And not enough attention? It's the ONLY story in the deer world that gets any real attention, even though it's proven time and time again to be almost a non issue. More deer die every year from EHD than have probably died in the last 30 years from CWD, yet there is zero government attention to it.
And Mr. VanRoss, I think you may have CWD and EHD mixed up. Deer that die from EHD typically die near water. Not CWD.
 
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Colorado Chronic Wasting Disease Response Plan December 2018

I. Executive Summary Mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk and moose are highly valued species in North America. Some of Colorado’s herds of these species are increasingly becoming infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD). As of July 2018, at least 31 of Colorado's 54 deer herds (57%), 16 of 43 elk herds (37%), and 2 of 9 moose herds (22%) are known to be infected with CWD. Four of Colorado's 5 largest deer herds and 2 of the state’s 5 largest elk herds are infected. Deer herds tend to be more heavily infected than elk and moose herds living in the same geographic area. Not only are the number of infected herds increasing, the past 15 years of disease trends generally show an increase in the proportion of infected animals within herds as well. Of most concern, greater than a 10-fold increase in CWD prevalence has been estimated in some mule deer herds since the early 2000s; CWD is now adversely affecting the performance of these herds.

snip...

https://cpw.state.co.us/Documents/RulesRegs/Brochure/BigGame/biggame.pdf

Research Project: TRANSMISSION, DIFFERENTIATION, AND PATHOBIOLOGY OF TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES Location: Virus and Prion Research

Title: Disease-associated prion protein detected in lymphoid tissues from pigs challenged with the agent of chronic wasting disease

Author item MOORE, SARAH - Orise Fellow item Kunkle, Robert item KONDRU, NAVEEN - Iowa State University item MANNE, SIREESHA - Iowa State University item SMITH, JODI - Iowa State University item KANTHASAMY, ANUMANTHA - Iowa State University item WEST GREENLEE, M - Iowa State University item Greenlee, Justin Submitted to: Prion Publication Type: Abstract Only Publication Acceptance Date: 3/15/2017 Publication Date: N/A Citation: N/A Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Aims: Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally-occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. We previously demonstrated that disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) can be detected in the brain and retina from pigs challenged intracranially or orally with the CWD agent. In that study, neurological signs consistent with prion disease were observed only in one pig: an intracranially challenged pig that was euthanized at 64 months post-challenge. The purpose of this study was to use an antigen-capture immunoassay (EIA) and real-time quaking-induced conversion (QuIC) to determine whether PrPSc is present in lymphoid tissues from pigs challenged with the CWD agent.

Methods: At two months of age, crossbred pigs were challenged by the intracranial route (n=20), oral route (n=19), or were left unchallenged (n=9). At approximately 6 months of age, the time at which commercial pigs reach market weight, half of the pigs in each group were culled (<6 month challenge groups). The remaining pigs (>6 month challenge groups) were allowed to incubate for up to 73 months post challenge (mpc). The retropharyngeal lymph node (RPLN) was screened for the presence of PrPSc by EIA and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The RPLN, palatine tonsil, and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) from 6-7 pigs per challenge group were also tested using EIA and QuIC.

Results: PrPSc was not detected by EIA and IHC in any RPLNs. All tonsils and MLNs were negative by IHC, though the MLN from one pig in the oral <6 month group was positive by EIA. PrPSc was detected by QuIC in at least one of the lymphoid tissues examined in 5/6 pigs in the intracranial <6 months group, 6/7 intracranial >6 months group, 5/6 pigs in the oral <6 months group, and 4/6 oral >6 months group. Overall, the MLN was positive in 14/19 (74%) of samples examined, the RPLN in 8/18 (44%), and the tonsil in 10/25 (40%).

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that PrPSc accumulates in lymphoid tissues from pigs challenged intracranially or orally with the CWD agent, and can be detected as early as 4 months after challenge. CWD-infected pigs rarely develop clinical disease and if they do, they do so after a long incubation period. This raises the possibility that CWD-infected pigs could shed prions into their environment long before they develop clinical disease. Furthermore, lymphoid tissues from CWD-infected pigs could present a potential source of CWD infectivity in the animal and human food chains.

https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=337105

https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=326166

https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=353091

https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/project/?accnNo=432011&fy=2017

Texas Kimble County Farm Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Approximate Herd Prevalence 12%

SUMMARY MINUTES OF THE 407th COMMISSION MEETING Texas Animal Health Commission

September 22, 2020

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD):

A new CWD positive breeding herd was disclosed in February 2020 in Kimble County. This herd depopulation was completed in July 2020. Including the two index positive deer, an additional eight more positive deer were disclosed (approximate herd prevalence 12%). Since July 2015 and prior to this discovery, five positive captive breeder herds have been disclosed and four of those are in Medina County. One herd in Lavaca and three herds in Medina County were depopulated leaving one large herd in Medina County that is managed on a herd plan. A new zone was established in Val Verde County in December 2019 as a result of a positive free-ranging White-tailed Deer (WTD). A second positive WTD was also disclosed in February 2020 in the same area.

SUMMARY MINUTES OF THE 407th COMMISSION MEETING – 9/22/2020

Scrapie: The flock identified in April 2016 remains under quarantine in Hartley County.

https://www.tahc.texas.gov/agency/meetings/minutes/SummaryMinutes_CommMtg_2020-09-22.pdf
 
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***> TEXAS BREEDER DEER ESCAPEE WITH CWD IN THE WILD, or so the genetics would show?

OH NO, please tell me i heard this wrong, a potential Texas captive escapee with cwd in the wild, in an area with positive captive cwd herd?

apparently, no ID though. tell me it ain't so please...

23:00 minute mark

''Free Ranging Deer, Dr. Deyoung looked at Genetics of this free ranging deer and what he found was, that the genetics on this deer were more similar to captive deer, than the free ranging population, but he did not see a significant connection to any one captive facility that he analyzed, so we believe, Ahhhhhh, this animal had some captive ahhh, whatnot.''

https://youtu.be/aoPDeGL6mpQ?t=1384

TEXAS CWD STRAIN

77. Assessing chronic wasting disease strain differences in free-ranging cervids across the United States

Kaitlyn M. Wagnera, Caitlin Ott-Connb, Kelly Strakab, Bob Dittmarc, Jasmine Battend, Robyn Piercea, Mercedes Hennessya, Elizabeth Gordona, Brett Israela, Jenn Ballarde and Mark D Zabela

aPrion Research Center at Colorado State University; bMichigan Department of Natural Resources; cTexas Parks and Wildlife Department; dMissouri Department of Conservation, 5. Arkansas Game and Fish Commission CONTACT Kaitlyn M. Wagner [email protected].edu

ABSTRACT

Background/Introduction: Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an invariably fatal prion disease affecting captive and free-ranging cervids, including white-tailed deer, mule deer, moose, elk, and reindeer. Since the initial description of the disease in the 1960’s, CWD has spread to 23 states, 3 Canadian Provinces, South Korea, Norway and, most recently, Finland. While some outbreaks of CWD were caused by transport of infected animals from endemic regions, the origin of CWD in other epizootics is unclear and has not been characterized. Previous studies have shown that there are two distinct strains of CWD. However, the continuous spread and the unclear origin of several outbreaks warrant continued surveillance and further characterization of strain diversity.

Materials and Methods: To address these knowledge gaps, we used biochemical tests to assess strain differences between CWD outbreaks in Michigan, Texas, Missouri, and Colorado, USA. Brain or lymph node samples were homogenized and digested in 50 µg/mL proteinase K (PK). These samples were then run on a Western blot to assess glycoform ratio and electrophoretic mobility. Texas samples were digested in 100 µg/mL PK. To assess conformational stability, brain or lymph node homogenates were incubated in increasing concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride from 0 M to 4 M in 0.5 M increments. Samples were then precipitated in methanol overnight, washed and PK digested in 50 µg/mL PK before slot blotting.

Results: Our results have found significant differences in glycoform ratio between CWD from Michigan and Colorado, but no differences were observed in conformational stability assays. Interestingly, when testing our CWD isolates from Texas to analyse electrophoretic mobility and glycoform ratio, we found that these samples did not exhibit the characteristic band shift when treated with PK, but PK resistant material remained. Additionally, results from our conformational stability assay demonstrate a unique profile of these Texas isolates. Testing of samples from Missouri is currently underway.

Conclusions: Thus far, our data indicate that there are strain differences between CWD circulating in Michigan and CWD in Colorado and provide important insight into CWD strain differences between two non-contiguous outbreaks. We have also identified a unique strain of CWD in Texas with biochemical strain properties not seen in any of our other CWD isolates. These results highlight the importance of continued surveillance to better understand this devastating disease. These results have important implications for CWD emergence, evolution and our understanding of prion strain heterogeneity on the landscape.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19336896.2019.1615197

The disease devastating deer herds may also threaten human health

Scientists are exploring the origins of chronic wasting disease before it becomes truly catastrophic.

Rae Ellen Bichell

April 8, 2019

This story was published in collaboration with the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration between Wyoming Public Media, Boise State Public Radio in Idaho, KUER in Salt Lake City and KRCC and KUNC in Colorado.

SNIP...

One day in late February, in their laboratory in Fort Collins, Colorado, Wagner and Zabel compared the prions from the brains of CWD-infected deer in Texas with those of elk in Colorado. They want to know if the proteins were all mangled in the same way, or not. “If they are different, this would suggest that we have different strain properties, which is evidence as we're building our case that we might have multiple strains of CWD circulating in the U.S.,” says Wagner.
Step one is to see if they’re equally easy to destroy using a chemical called guanidine. The shape of a prion dictates everything, including the way it interacts with an animal’s cells and the ease with which chemicals can unfold it.
“Moment of truth,” said Wagner, as she and Zabel huddled around a computer, waiting for results to come through. When they did, Zabel was surprised.

“Wow,” he said. “Unlike anything we've seen before.”

The prions from the Texas deer were a lot harder to destroy than the ones from the Colorado elk. In fact, the guanidine barely damaged them at all. “We’ve never seen that before in any prion strain, which means that it has a completely different structure than we've ever seen before,” says Zabel. And that suggests that it might be a very different kind of chronic wasting disease. The researchers ran the same test on another Texas deer, with the same results.

https://www.hcn.org/articles/wildli...-herds-may-also-threaten-human-health-science

***> This is very likely to have parallels with control efforts for CWD in cervids.

Paper

Rapid recontamination of a farm building occurs after attempted prion removal

Kevin Christopher Gough BSc (Hons), PhD Claire Alison Baker BSc (Hons) Steve Hawkins MIBiol Hugh Simmons BVSc, MRCVS, MBA, MA Timm Konold DrMedVet, PhD, MRCVS … See all authors

First published: 19 January 2019 https://doi.org/10.1136/vr.105054

snip...

This study clearly demonstrates the difficulty in removing scrapie infectivity from the farm environment. Practical and effective prion decontamination methods are still urgently required for decontamination of scrapie infectivity from farms that have had cases of scrapie and this is particularly relevant for scrapiepositive goatherds, which currently have limited genetic resistance to scrapie within commercial breeds.24 This is very likely to have parallels with control efforts for CWD in cervids.

https://bvajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1136/vr.105054

***> Infectious agent of sheep scrapie may persist in the environment for at least 16 years

***> Nine of these recurrences occurred 14–21 years after culling, apparently as the result of environmental contamination, but outside entry could not always be absolutely excluded.

JOURNAL OF GENERAL VIROLOGY Volume 87, Issue 12

Infectious agent of sheep scrapie may persist in the environment for at least 16 years Free

Gudmundur Georgsson1, Sigurdur Sigurdarson2, Paul Brown3

http://www.microbiologyresearch.org...est&checksum=ED0572E1E5B272C100A32212A3E3761A

Circulation of prions within dust on a scrapie affected farm

Kevin C Gough1 , Claire A Baker2 , Hugh A Simmons3 , Steve A Hawkins3 and Ben C Maddison2*

Scrapie containing dusts could possibly infect animals during feeding and drinking, and respiratory and conjunctival routes may also be involved. It has been demonstrated that scrapie can be efficiently transmitted via the nasal route in sheep [17], as is also the case for CWD in both murine models and in white tailed deer [18-20].

The sources of dust borne prions are unknown but it seems reasonable to assume that faecal, urine, skin, parturient material and saliva-derived prions may contribute to this mobile environmental reservoir of infectivity. This work highlights a possible transmission route for scrapie within the farm environment, and this is likely to be paralleled in CWD which shows strong similarities with scrapie in terms of prion dissemination and disease transmission. The data indicate that the presence of scrapie prions in dust is likely to make the control of these diseases a considerable challenge.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4397813/
 
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''PrPCWD has been detected in one fawn by IHC as early as 40 days of age. Moreover, sPMCA performed on rectal lymphoid tissue has yielded positive results on another fawn at ten days of age.''

Envt.18: Mother to Offspring Transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease

Candace K. Mathiason,† Amy Nalls, Kelly Anderson, Jeanette Hayes-Klug, Jenny G. Powers, Nicholas J. Haley and Edward A. Hoover

Colorado State University; Fort Collins, CO USA †

Presenting author; Email: [email protected]

We have developed a new cervid model in small Asian muntjac deer (Muntiacus reevesi) to study potential modes of vertical transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) from mother to offspring. Eight of eight (8/8) muntjac doe orally infected with CWD tested PrPCWD lymphoid positive by four months post infection. Ten fawns were born to these CWD-infected doe— four of the fawns were viable, five were non-viable and one was a first trimester fetus harvested from a CWD-infected doe euthanized at end-stage disease. The viable fawns have been monitored for CWD infection by immunohistochemistry and sPMCA performed on serial tonsil and rectal lymphoid tissue biopsies. PrPCWD has been detected in one fawn by IHC as early as 40 days of age. Moreover, sPMCA performed on rectal lymphoid tissue has yielded positive results on another fawn at ten days of age. In addition, sPMCA assays have demonstrated amplifiable prions in fetal placental or spleen tissue of three non-viable fawns and mammary tissue of the dams. Additional pregnancy related fluids and tissues from the doe as well as tissue from the nonviable fawns are currently being probed for the presence of CWD. In summary, we have employed the muntjac deer model, to demonstrate for the first time the transmission of CWD from mother to offspring. These studies provide the foundation to investigate the mechanisms and pathways of maternal prion transfer.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.4161/pri.15899
 
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TEXAS CWD TSE Prion Urgent Letter to Honorable Arch H. Aplin, III from Officials and Land Owners

''the high rate of “lost” deer, and other inadequacies and loopholes in the current rules have put our state’s susceptible cervid herds at significant risk''

June 14, 2021

The Honorable Arch H. Aplin, III

Chairman, Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission

4200 Smith School Road

Austin, Texas 78744

Dear Chairman Aplin,

In light of the recent discovery of CWD in captive deer herds, the undersigned encourage the
Commission to take swift and decisive action to protect our captive and wild deer herds, even up
to an immediate partial or complete shut-down of deer movement. It is imperative that the
response be focused not only on uncovering the sources of the infections, but also in promptly
conducting all necessary trace-outs to determine the extent of disease spread.

We appreciate and value the efforts of the Commission and the Department staff to rapidly and
effectively deal with this CWD outbreak, but as you are aware, and as staff at the Texas Parks
and Wildlife Department (Department) have stated, the modeling used in establishing the current
testing requirements has proven insufficient to detect CWD at any reasonable probability and
degree of confidence. It is likely that CWD was present in the Uvalde County index facility for a
year or more prior to detection, and over a hundred deer were transported to other breeders and
release sites in the interim. Additionally, the combined effects of insufficient reporting, testing,
and other non-compliance issues with current rules, the high rate of “lost” deer, and other
inadequacies and loopholes in the current rules have put our state’s susceptible cervid herds at
significant risk.

By the rights and privileges conveyed in the permitting process, deer breeders have accepted and
taken calculated risks, for which they are ultimately responsible. While the Department has
operated in good faith, it is also the Department’s responsibility to take any and all necessary
actions required by their mission statement. The time has come for deer breeders and the
Department to accept the necessity that additional steps must be taken to protect this incredibly
valuable resource for the public good.

The undersigned strongly urge that the Commission promote enforcement of existing rules and
regulations, including revocation, suspension, or non-renewal of non-compliant deer breeders,
pursuant to Sunset recommendations. It is also imperative that the Commission promptly engage
all appropriate stakeholders (CWD Taskforce, White-tailed Deer Advisory Committee, and Deer
Breeder User Group) to review and bolster existing rules that have clearly proven insufficient to
identify and contain this disease. In addition, we urge the Department to work closely with
Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) and other regulatory agencies in expediting the
trace-out process, strengthening the oversight of carcass disposal and transport, as well as
strengthening the rules and testing related to exotics as a highest priority.

In closing, we express our strong support for tightening any loopholes that exist in current rules
associated with CWD detection and containment. We also ask that the Department revisit all
assessments made for probability of detection and correct deficits that might currently exist. It is
imperative that our response to CWD in Texas move from a reactive to a proactive posture that
more effectively protects this precious resource.

Again, we whole-heartedly support and value the Commission and the Department staff as you
rapidly and effectively deal with this CWD outbreak, and we stand ready to assist and support
you in any manner necessary.

Respectfully,
 
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Respectfully,

Terry Anderson – Nacogdoches County Landowner
Ernest Angelo Jr. - Former TPWD Commissioner
John Barrett – Mason County Landowner
Giovana L. Benitez, South Texans’ Property Rights Association Director, Hidalgo
County Landowner
George Bristol – Texas Foundation for Conservation
Dr. Fred C. Bryant – Texas Foundation for Conservation; Past President, Texas Chapter of The
Wildlife Society; Former Board Member, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation; Professional
Member, Boone & Crockett Club
Rene Barrientos – South Texas Landowner
Emry Birdwell - Partner, Birdwell & Clark Ranch, Lone Star Land Steward Award Recipient
Rory Burroughs – Fisher County Landowner
Gus T. Canales – South Texas Landowner
Linda Campbell – Certified Wildlife Biologist; Past President, Texas Chapter of The Wildlife
Society
Dr. Jim Cathey – Past President – Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society
Ken Cearley – Certified Wildlife Biologist, Cornerstone Ranching Solutions LLC
Michael J. Cherry - Wildlife Biologist
Deborah Clark - Partner, Birdwell & Clark Ranch, Lone Star Land Steward Award Recipient
Charles A. DeYoung - Ph D, Wildlife Biologist
Dr. Randy DeYoung - PhD, Fellow, The Wildlife Society
Don Dietz – Certified Wildlife Biologist
Cary Dietzmann – Washington County Landowner
Alice East – South Texans’ Property Rights Association, South Texas Landowner
Dr. Bill Eikenhorst – Veterinarian, Washington County Landowner
Jay C. Evans –Texas Landowner
Richard Guerra - Starr County landowner
Henry Hamman, South Texas Landowner
Trey Henderson – Angelina County Landowner
Dr. David G. Hewitt; Past President of the Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society; Professional
Member, Boone and Crockett Club
Dr. Clayton D. Hilton – Veterinarian; Professional Member, Boone and Crockett Club
Gail & Bruce Hoffman - Jim Wells County Landowners
Anson B. Howard, Dimmit, Tom Green, and Coleman County Landowner
A.C. “Dick” Jones, IV - Jim Hogg County Landowner
W.W “Whit” Jones III - Jim Hogg County Landowner
David Kelly – Brooks County Ranch Manager, Leopold Award Recipient
Tio Kleberg – South Texas Landowner
Whitney Marion Klenzendorf – Frio County Landowner
Dr. Wallace Klussmann – Retired Head, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, Texas
A&M University; Past President, Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society; Founder, Texas
Youth Hunting Program
Jim Kolkhorst – Conservationist, Washington and Freestone County Landowner
Keith Lake – Wildlife Biologist
David K. Langford – Kendall County Landowner; Retired CEO, Texas Wildlife Association;
Lone Star Land Steward Award Recipient, Emeritus Member, Boone & Crockett Club
Berdon Lawrence – South Texans’ Property Rights Director, South Texas Landowner
Ken Leonard – South Texas Landowner
Roy Leslie – Low fence, no lease Kendall County Landowner; Lone Star Land Steward Award
Recipient
Dr. Roel Lopez – Past President – Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society, Texas Foundation for
Conservation, Professional Member – Boone & Crockett Club
Chancey Lewis - Wildlife Biologist, Milam County Landowner
Steve C. Lewis – Kendall & Medina Landowner; Past President, Texas Wildlife Association
Ben Masters - Conservation Filmmaker, Writer
T. Nyle Maxwell – McCulloch and Hudspeth County Landowner
Coley Means – Culberson & Jeff Davis County Landowner
Jon Means – Culberson & Jeff Davis County Landowner; Past President, Texas & Southwestern
Cattle Raisers Association
Dr. Dan McBride – Veterinarian; Regular Member, Boone and Crockett Club, Burnet and
Hudspeth County Landowner
Robert F. McFarlane M.D. – Anderson County Landowner, Leopold Conservation Award
Recipient
Dr. James E. Miller - Past-President, The Wildlife Society; Honorary Member of The Wildlife
Society; Aldo Leopold Memorial Award Recipient
Brian Murphy – Certified Wildlife Biologist; Former CEO, Quality Deer Management
Association
Steve Nelle – Consulting Biologist
Eric Opiela, South Texans’ Property Rights Association President; Karnes, Bee and Live Oak
County Landowner
Dr. J. Alfonso “Poncho” Ortega, President of the Society for Range Management
Ellen Randall – South Texans’ Property Rights Association Director, Medina County Landowner
Jenny Sanders – Conservationist, Trinity County Landowner
Robert Sanders – Wildlife Biologist, Trinity County Landowner
Andrew Sansom - Professor of Practice in Geography and Executive Director; The Meadows
Center for Water and the Environment
Neil Shelton – Hartley & Oldham County Landowner
John Shepperd, Texas Foundation for Conservation
Dr. Nova J. Silvy - Fellow and Past President, The Wildlife Society; Aldo Leopold Memorial
Award Recipient
Greg Simons – Wildlife Biologist, Liberty, Jasper, Brazoria and Johnson County Landowner
South Texans’ Property Rights Association
Dr. Don Steinbach – Certified Wildlife Biologist, Executive Director – Texas Chapter of The
Wildlife Society, Washington County Landowner
Tye Stephens - Wildlife Biologist, Ranch Broker
Romey Swanson – Certified Wildlife Biologist; President, Texas Chapter of The Wildlife
Society
Ellen Temple – East Texas Landowner, Leopold Conservation Award Recipient
Tamara Trail – Conservationist, Shackelford County Landowner, Lone Star Land Steward
Award Recipient
Gary Valentine
Dr. Matt Wagner, Certified Wildlife Biologist
Larry Weishuhn – Wildlife Biologist; Co-Founder, Texas Wildlife Association
Irvin Welch – Wildlife Biologist, Landowner
Dr. Neal Wilkins – Certified Wildlife Biologist; South Texans’ Property Rights Association
Director; Professional Member, Boone & Crockett Club
Charlie Williams – Bandera and Medina County Landowner
Simon Winston – Trinity, Angelina, and Nacogdoches County Landowner; Leopold
Conservation Award Recipient
Carl Young - Williamson, Travis, and Brewster County Landowner
CC: The Honorable Greg Abbott, Governor of Texas
The Honorable Dan Patrick, Lieutenant Governor of Texas
The Honorable Dade Phelan, Speaker – Texas House of Representatives
The Honorable Ken King, Chair – House Culture, Recreation & Tourism Committee
The Honorable Tracy King, Chair – House Agriculture & Livestock Committee
The Honorable Charles Perry, Chair – Senate Agriculture, Water & Rural Affairs
Committee
The Honorable James E. Abell, TPW Commissioner
The Honorable Oliver J. Bell, TPW Commissioner
The Honorable Paul L. Foster, TPW Commissioner
The Honorable Anna B. Gallo, TPW Commissioner
The Honorable Jeffery D. Hildebrand, TPW Commissioner
The Honorable Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr., TPW Commissioner
The Honorable Travis B. “Blake” Rowling, TPW Commissioner
The Honorable Richard “Dick” Scott, TPW Commissioner
The Honorable Lee M. Bass, Chairman-Emeritus – TPW Commission
The Honorable T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus – TPW Commission
The Honorable Coleman Locke, Chair - TAHC Commission
The Honorable Jim Eggleston, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Jimmie Ruth Evans, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Melanie Johnson, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Kenneth “Ken” Jordan, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Barret J. Klein, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Wendee C. Langdon, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Joe Leathers, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Thomas “Tommy” Oates, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Joseph “Joe” Osterkamp, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Keith M. Staggs, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Leo Vermedahl, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Michael L. Vickers, TAHC Commissioner
The Honorable Jimmie Ruth Evans, Chair, TPWD Private Lands Advisory Committee
Mr. Carter Smith, TPWD Executive Director
Dr. Andy Schwartz, DVM, TAHC Executive Director
=====end=====
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
 
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CONCERNING!

SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2021

Second passage of chronic wasting disease of mule deer to sheep by intracranial inoculation compared to classical scrapie

''Given the results of this study, current diagnostic techniques would be unlikely to distinguish CWD in sheep from scrapie in sheep if cross-species transmission occurred naturally.''

https://scrapie-usa.blogspot.com/2021/05/second-passage-of-chronic-wasting.html

FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 2016

Texas Scrapie Confirmed in a Hartley County Sheep where CWD was detected in a Mule Deer

http://scrapie-usa.blogspot.com/2016/04/texas-scrapie-confirmed-in-hartley.html

“Regrettably, the gravity of this situation continues to mount with these new CWD positive discoveries, as well as with the full understanding of just how many other facilities and release sites across Texas were connected to the CWD positive sites in Uvalde and Hunt Counties,” said Carter Smith, Executive Director of TPWD.

For Immediate Release

May 14, 2021

Chronic Wasting Disease Discovered at Deer Breeding Facilities in Matagorda and Mason Counties

AUSTIN, TX – Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) has been discovered in deer breeding facilities in both Matagorda and Mason counties. This marks the first positive detection of the disease in each county.

An epidemiological investigation found that both deer breeding facilities had received deer from the Uvalde County premises confirmed positive with CWD on March 29, 2021. Postmortem tissue samples were submitted by the permitted deer breeders to assist Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) and Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) with the epidemiological investigation. The National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, has since confirmed CWD in those tissue samples.

TPWD and TAHC officials have taken immediate action to secure all cervids at the Matagorda County and Mason County deer breeding facilities and plan to conduct additional investigations for CWD. In addition, other breeding facilities and release sites that have received deer from these facilities or shipped deer to these facilities during the last five years have been contacted by TPWD and cannot move or release deer at this time.

On March 31, 2021, TPWD and TAHC reported two CWD confirmations at breeding facilities in both Hunt and Uvalde counties. The Hunt facility underwent further DNA testing to confirm animal identification and origin, and on May 12 the DNA test results confirmed the deer’s connection to the premises.

TPWD and TAHC continue to work together to determine the extent of the disease within all the affected facilities and evaluate risks to Texas’ free ranging deer populations. Quick detection of CWD can help mitigate the disease’s spread.

“Regrettably, the gravity of this situation continues to mount with these new CWD positive discoveries, as well as with the full understanding of just how many other facilities and release sites across Texas were connected to the CWD positive sites in Uvalde and Hunt Counties,” said Carter Smith, Executive Director of TPWD. “Along with our partners at the Texas Animal Health Commission, we will continue to exercise great diligence and urgency with this ongoing investigation. Accelerating the testing at other exposed facilities will be critical in ensuring we are doing all we can to arrest the further spread of this disease, which poses great risks to our native deer populations, both captive and free-ranging alike.”

CWD was first recognized in the U.S. in 1967 and has since been documented in captive and/or free-ranging deer in 26 states and 3 Canadian provinces.

In Texas, the disease was first discovered in 2012 in free-ranging mule deer along a remote area of the Hueco Mountains near the Texas-New Mexico border and has since been detected in 228 captive or free-ranging cervids, including white-tailed deer, mule deer, red deer and elk in 13 Texas counties. For more information on previous detections visit the CWD page on the TPWD website. CWD is a fatal neurological disease found in certain cervids, including deer, elk, moose and other members of the deer family. CWD is a slow and progressive disease. Due to a long incubation, cervids infected with CWD may not produce any visible signs for a number of years after becoming infected. As the disease progresses, animals with CWD show changes in behavior and appearance. Clinical signs may include, progressive weight loss, stumbling or tremors with a lack of coordination, excessive thirst, salivation or urination, loss of appetite, teeth grinding, abnormal head posture, and/or drooping ears. To date there is no evidence that CWD poses a risk to humans or non-cervids. However, as a precaution, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization recommend not to consume meat from infected animals. For more information about CWD, visit the TPWD web site or the TAHC web site.

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https://www.tahc.texas.gov/news/2021/2021-05-14_CWD.pdf

“Regrettably, the gravity of this situation continues to mount with these new CWD positive discoveries, as well as with the full understanding of just how many other facilities and release sites across Texas were connected to the CWD positive sites in Uvalde and Hunt Counties,” said Carter Smith, Executive Director of TPWD.

Texas Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Positives Mounting 224 To Date

see the latest positives;

2021-04-27 Breeder Deer Mason Facility #10 White-tailed Deer M 2.482191781

2021-04-27 Breeder Deer Uvalde Facility #7 White-tailed Deer M 1.5

2021-04-27 Breeder Deer Uvalde Facility #7 White-tailed Deer M 1.5

2021-04-20 Breeder Deer Matagorda Facility #9 White-tailed Deer F 1.5

2021-03-29 Breeder Deer Uvalde Facility #7 White-tailed Deer F 3.536986301

2021-03-29 Breeder Deer Uvalde Facility #7 White-tailed Deer M 2.178082192

2021-03-29 Breeder Deer Uvalde Facility #7 White-tailed Deer M 3.5

2021-03-29 Breeder Deer Uvalde Facility #7 White-tailed Deer M 1.545205479

2021-03-29 Breeder Deer Uvalde Facility #7 White-tailed Deer M 2.482191781

2021-03-29 Breeder Deer Hunt Facility #8 White-tailed Deer F 2.482191781

https://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/diseases/cwd/tracking/

FRIDAY, JUNE 04, 2021

Texas Breeder Deer May Have Spread Brain Disease CWD TSE Prion Into The Wild

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2021/06/texas-breeder-deer-may-have-spread.html

THURSDAY, MAY 06, 2021

Texas Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Positives Mounting 224 To Date

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2021/05/texas-chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-tse.html

SUNDAY, MAY 23, 2021

TEXAS 267 DIFFERENT SITES HAVE RECEIVED DEER FROM AT LEAST ONE OF THE TWO RECENT CWD POSITIVE FACILITIES

https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2021/05/texas-267-different-sites-have-received.html

https://transmissiblespongiformence.../texas-267-different-sites-have-received.html
 
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