Temps to kill oats

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callmefence

callmefence

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See lots of oats with the tops burnt. Looks like bottoms are still green. Not sure if there is enough time to recover though.
I kinda think they will grow through the burn. Seems like the stuff that hadn't been grazed and was taller got hurt worse. As rule we generally don't graze after March 1 if we're going to try for hay. I don't know what the effect on yield will be.


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bird dog

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I agree with Fence's assessment. Mine that is being grazed was not hurt to bad. The top broader leaves are singed but the harder grazed plants seem to be relatively untouched. I'm not sure it will make a hay crop but I topped dressed with it some Nitrogen last week to see what happens. Mine are Bob oats.

I have seen some wheat that has also been damaged. I thought it was more bullet proof but from what I understand. some varieties freeze back like the oats do.
 
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callmefence

callmefence

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I agree with Fence's assessment. Mine that is being grazed was not hurt to bad. The top broader leaves are singed but the harder grazed plants seem to be relatively untouched. I'm not sure it will make a hay crop but I topped dressed with it some Nitrogen last week to see what happens. Mine are Bob oats.

I have seen some wheat that has also been damaged. I thought it was more bullet proof but from what I understand. some varieties freeze back like the oats do.
Mine are bin run local Bob oats as well. Guy down the road has a field of some kinda bagged seed oats that are burned to the dirt. They are over a foot high. He ran out of seed and finished with some wheat. The wheat is just slightly burned.
 

RDFF

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I feel for you guys down there... we're a long ways from "growing stuff"... but I frost seed pasture and cover crops every spring... drilling on seed through an inch or two of snow is my PREFERRED method....... so seeing how ya'll come out with your oats is interesting to me. Up here, we'd never expect any oat crop to survive temps as low as single digits. Keep the pics coming as you recover.

I'm wanting to figure out what various species will "keep their green" best going into hard cold winter weather for winter stockpile grazing, so this experience is helpful to learning that, even if it is painful.
 

kenny thomas

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From past experience it seems to take a while for them to start growing again. If I ever have some burnt again I will either graze or cut it back to the green.
 
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callmefence

callmefence

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I feel for you guys down there... we're a long ways from "growing stuff"... but I frost seed pasture and cover crops every spring... drilling on seed through an inch or two of snow is my PREFERRED method....... so seeing how ya'll come out with your oats is interesting to me. Up here, we'd never expect any oat crop to survive temps as low as single digits. Keep the pics coming as you recover.

I'm wanting to figure out what various species will "keep their green" best going into hard cold winter weather for winter stockpile grazing, so this experience is helpful to learning that, even if it is painful.
I'm sure our savior was warm ground temps. We typically plant oats in September and have grazing before December. Wheat is planted later and doesn't offer the early grazing. Same with ryegrass.

Oats
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Pasture volunteer ryegrass and Texas winter grass.
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I don't think you could get a better comparison of cold hardiness between oats and wheat than this.
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Brute 23

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I've noticed the oats in the wide open were hit harder than the stuff with a tree or brush line as a wind break. Wonder if it's more if a wind burn than from the ice and snow.
 

Brute 23

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A lot of the oats here is back green and looks pretty good today.

Even the winter pasture grass has taken off this past week and looks really good.
 

RDFF

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I took this pic today of the clover getting going even way up here in Minnesota! The power of biology!!!!

I'll be frost seeding 120 acres first thing in the morning, to get it put on before all the snow melts and I can't tell where I've gone with the drills! Here's a pic of me doing the same in 2017. Folks around here always say that since I do this, I'm always the "first one in the field!"

Clover 3-3-21.jpgPlanting Oats As Cover Crop, March 13, 2017, #2.jpg
 

1982vett

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How long since you seen mud until now
I guess our biggest rain in the past 2 years, little over an inch, was back in September from one of the hurricanes. Been a long time since any real mud. Just gets slick on top for a few hours unless it takes a couple days to get a half inch. Then it can get a little slick for a day or so after. Been 22 months since water has gone over the spillways. 93DF54D0-38F1-46B9-84DE-621A220D65C1.jpeg. This one started the summer a couple feet higher. Saving grace has been the timing of the rain we did get and it comes slow enough the ground sucks it up like a sponge.
 
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