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Storing Corn By products

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Stocker Steve

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The university boys keep talking about buying in wet distillers grain cheap, mixing it in a TMR with some high fiber feed, and then putting it in a silage bag. Have you actually done this?

I am tempting to just dump some dry by product in the hay shed and save on the plastic bag.
 

mnmtranching

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Sounds like it would be more expensive then $80 ton hay. Lot more hassle.
 

TexasBred

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Stocker Steve":32ksd619 said:
The university boys keep talking about buying in wet distillers grain cheap, mixing it in a TMR with some high fiber feed, and then putting it in a silage bag. Have you actually done this?
I am tempting to just dump some dry by product in the hay shed and save on the plastic bag.

The university boys are working off your money already. And they don't have to buy and maintain the equipment and facilities necessary to mix and feed a TMR.
 

2DM Limousin

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We buy syrup and wet,cake both. I've seen storage in ag bags before. It was mixed with low quality forage. And seemed to work well in the bag. We Pad our wet cake and tank our syrup TMR with mix wagon and Low to medium quality ruffage. Lot's of protein and Fat in By-products. Avg gain 2.75 to 3.25 daily. Ag bags very expensive now. For the money syrup is the best way to go. Old tank big enough to hold 6500gal (tank truck load) works well.
 
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Stocker Steve

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mnmtranching":3opkfbex said:
Sounds like it would be more expensive then $80 ton hay. Lot more hassle.

For cows I am feeding $80 a ton hay, some oats straw, and 1# of by pass protein for desert - - then planning to cull the hard keepers. I prefer to keep it simple even though you are not a big operator in my area unless you own a TMR and a semi.

For (mostly purchased comingled) stockers I tried zero supplement last summer due to high grain prices. Some did great but most did not. I think I need to continue some supplementing unless I can find fancy grass finished genetics. Thinking about beet shreds or DDG...
 

TexasBred

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I'd use some ddg as well. Beet Pulp is expensive as all get out down this way. Maybe cheaper up there but more bang for you money with the ddg if it's available.
 

blacksnake

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I recently attended a seminar on feed ing and storing by products. It was presented by University of Il extension and ddg reps.

They were touting storing the modified wet ddgs and gluten by basically dumping on ground or preferably concrete, covering with 1 to 2 inches of salt, covering with plastic. It lost very little nutrients after storage from fall well into late summer. The whole thing with modified wet or wet ddgs being economically feasible is the distance that they need to be transported. If you live close to an ethanol plant it looks pretty good.
 
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Stocker Steve

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blacksnake":3l12upp9 said:
They were touting storing the modified wet ddgs and gluten by basically dumping on ground or preferably concrete, covering with 1 to 2 inches of salt, covering with plastic. It lost very little nutrients after storage from fall well into late summer.

I have seen guys throw a couple hundred pounds of salt onto a WDG pile by hand. How did they put salt on 2" thick?
 

kenny thomas

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we tried wet corn gluten a few years ago because we could get it cheap. Dumped on covered concrete. worked well until spring and then the flies would carry you away. very nasty.
converted to dry matter is it still cheaper?
 

EAT BEEF

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I have been feeding ddg this winter about 2.5lbs a day,I just get it in 2000lbs super sacks.I take the flat bed trailer and get 4-6 sacks at a time.I like it so far,but I have to dip out of the sacks in buckets and haul it to the cows.Cows are looking pretty decent and my dogs have the slickest coats I have ever seen on farm dogs(they like to take a sample out of each bucket).

How much is everyone paying for ddg? The cheapest I can get is $190 a ton,I figure it's way cheaper up north,but $190 is way cheaper than anything else I have found in this part of the world.
 

blacksnake

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I looked over the handout I got from the extension guys. I said 1-2 inches of salt. The handout actually said 1 lb salt per square foot of surface area. I think the guy said this was about 1-2" but I'm not sure. He said they just went and bought 50 lb bags of stock salt and spread it by hand. He also said the modified wet was dry enough to support a tractor/loader if someone wanted to spread it with a tractor. They also did trials with storing it under crushed limestone. This did not turn out very well.
In my area, I just get my dry ddgs at the feed store. I just put 250 gallon open top totes on my trailer and they load into them. I can get about 1200 lb per tote. Cost has been running $145-$155 ton in the last month or two. I paid $199/ton last spring/summer.
 

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