Stockpiled pasture.

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Pax0307

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Through an unfortunate chain of events, I have a 40 acre hay pasture that didn’t get cut before winter. So I turned the herd out on to it for winter, hoping they’d take care of it. Basically as a stockpiled pasture. Parts of it they did and parts they didn’t. A good deal of it was just picked through. I have to make hay on it this summer. It’s made up of fescue, Johnson grass, and lespedeza and whatever other native grasses we have in Oklahoma. So what should I do with the dormant grass that’s left on the field? I have my own hay equipment and a brush hog.
 

snoopdog

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If you can burn it , that would be the most beneficial , if not , leave it alone and cut it like normal . What part of the state?
 
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Pax0307

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Unfortunately burning is a no go. High wind lately. It’s north east OK. The hay wouldn’t be worth much would it? Low crude protein content right?
 

CowsEatGrass

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Why not strip graze it instead. You can reap the benefits of feeding the cows free grass and have your grass evenly cut so to say. If you move them up to every three days your hay field will should be left an even level or you can left them eat if down to stubble by moving them too.
 

Texasmark

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Shred it as fine as is possible and then run a disc harrow over it to toss some dirt on it. It will develop into humus and should be fine enough, and/or covered enough to not be picked up in your rake when you do your haying. If JG, the seeds will make new plants for you and the discing will stimulate the rhizomes which will improve production.

Burning used to be common around here especially on wheat as it was the easy way out, especially on rented land. Ag. Extension folks publish no nos for such when it comes to soil condition and humus requirements. Besides we have had a constant burn ban in effect which is great for the soil and......you don't have to smell your neighbor's smoldering smudge pot any longer.
 

NolanCountyAG

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Texasmark":19886mv4 said:
Shred it as fine as is possible and then run a disc harrow over it to toss some dirt on it. It will develop into humus and should be fine enough, and/or covered enough to not be picked up in your rake when you do your haying. If JG, the seeds will make new plants for you and the discing will stimulate the rhizomes which will improve production.

Burning used to be common around here especially on wheat as it was the easy way out, especially on rented land. Ag. Extension folks publish no nos for such when it comes to soil condition and humus requirements. Besides we have had a constant burn ban in effect which is great for the soil and......you don't have to smell your neighbor's smoldering smudge pot any longer.

Where do you get that burning is bad for the soil?
 

snoopdog

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If it's really thick then I would shred it to a conservative height , but I would be more inclined to just make the first cutting early and use a protein supplement if needed later . Unless , of course , you are only going to cut once.
 
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Pax0307

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I usually take two cuttings off of it. I suppose I could sell this first cutting to my neighbor who has buffalo. Apparently they eat anything. Haha. If I brush hogged it, as to take off the seed head, would it come out of dormancy and regain some protein? Thanks for the help and forgive my ignorance.
 

snoopdog

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The fescue should be coming out of dormancy now , the new growth will have it's normal protein level . If you hog it you'll put back organic matter , but you'll have your time and fuel as an expense that you could have bought protein supplement if you have to feed it. If you leave it , you'll have more bales the first cutting for sale if you choose . Ive done it both ways , neither is wrong , If the weather permits and you can get it cut and cured early you may be surprised at the quality of the first cutting , and set yourself up for a great second cutting with enough time at the end of the season to stockpile again , weather permitting .
 

Texasmark

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NolanCountyAG":2ppfes75 said:
Texasmark":2ppfes75 said:
Shred it as fine as is possible and then run a disc harrow over it to toss some dirt on it. It will develop into humus and should be fine enough, and/or covered enough to not be picked up in your rake when you do your haying. If JG, the seeds will make new plants for you and the discing will stimulate the rhizomes which will improve production.

Burning used to be common around here especially on wheat as it was the easy way out, especially on rented land. Ag. Extension folks publish no nos for such when it comes to soil condition and humus requirements. Besides we have had a constant burn ban in effect which is great for the soil and......you don't have to smell your neighbor's smoldering smudge pot any longer.

Where do you get that burning is bad for the soil?

TAMU Soil Extension Services current papers. Agricultural Research Station at Renner (Tx.) published experiments in the 1960's, hard bound.
 

1982vett

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Texasmark":39fhew2m said:
NolanCountyAG":39fhew2m said:
Texasmark":39fhew2m said:
Shred it as fine as is possible and then run a disc harrow over it to toss some dirt on it. It will develop into humus and should be fine enough, and/or covered enough to not be picked up in your rake when you do your haying. If JG, the seeds will make new plants for you and the discing will stimulate the rhizomes which will improve production.

Burning used to be common around here especially on wheat as it was the easy way out, especially on rented land. Ag. Extension folks publish no nos for such when it comes to soil condition and humus requirements. Besides we have had a constant burn ban in effect which is great for the soil and......you don't have to smell your neighbor's smoldering smudge pot any longer.

Where do you get that burning is bad for the soil?

TAMU Soil Extension Services current papers. Agricultural Research Station at Renner (Tx.) published experiments in the 1960's, hard bound.

The Pioneer Woman on burning..... ;-)

http://thepioneerwoman.com/confessions/ ... -pastures/
 

TexasBred

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Texasmark":18kfgggj said:
Shred it as fine as is possible and then run a disc harrow over it to toss some dirt on it. It will develop into humus and should be fine enough, and/or covered enough to not be picked up in your rake when you do your haying. If JG, the seeds will make new plants for you and the discing will stimulate the rhizomes which will improve production.

Burning used to be common around here especially on wheat as it was the easy way out, especially on rented land. Ag. Extension folks publish no nos for such when it comes to soil condition and humus requirements. Besides we have had a constant burn ban in effect which is great for the soil and......you don't have to smell your neighbor's smoldering smudge pot any longer.
Haven't seen a wheat field on fire in 40 years. Farmers disc the stubble back into the ground and have been doing it for ages.
 

Texasmark

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TexasBred":33tyy45h said:
Texasmark":33tyy45h said:
Shred it as fine as is possible and then run a disc harrow over it to toss some dirt on it. It will develop into humus and should be fine enough, and/or covered enough to not be picked up in your rake when you do your haying. If JG, the seeds will make new plants for you and the discing will stimulate the rhizomes which will improve production.

Burning used to be common around here especially on wheat as it was the easy way out, especially on rented land. Ag. Extension folks publish no nos for such when it comes to soil condition and humus requirements. Besides we have had a constant burn ban in effect which is great for the soil and......you don't have to smell your neighbor's smoldering smudge pot any longer.
Haven't seen a wheat field on fire in 40 years. Farmers disc the stubble back into the ground and have been doing it for ages.

During the season, county to the East has several......no burn ban. Easy to tell with the white smoke and amount of it.
 

Texasmark

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1982vett":11c0k8cx said:
Texasmark":11c0k8cx said:
NolanCountyAG":11c0k8cx said:
Where do you get that burning is bad for the soil?

TAMU Soil Extension Services current papers. Agricultural Research Station at Renner (Tx.) published experiments in the 1960's, hard bound.

The Pioneer Woman on burning..... ;-)

http://thepioneerwoman.com/confessions/ ... -pastures/

Different critter. She is burning off dead grass and undesirables from (mechanically) undisturbed pasture. We are talking about (at least I think the subject is) burning off pastures prior to mechanically working the soil for a crop wherein Humus in the soil is the consideration.
 

1982vett

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Texasmark":2f82907t said:
1982vett":2f82907t said:
Texasmark":2f82907t said:
TAMU Soil Extension Services current papers. Agricultural Research Station at Renner (Tx.) published experiments in the 1960's, hard bound.

The Pioneer Woman on burning..... ;-)

http://thepioneerwoman.com/confessions/ ... -pastures/

Different critter. She is burning off dead grass and undesirables from (mechanically) undisturbed pasture. We are talking about (at least I think the subject is) burning off pastures prior to mechanically working the soil for a crop wherein Humus in the soil is the consideration.
Different critter she is for sure..... :lol:

Pax0307":2f82907t said:
Through an unfortunate chain of events, I have a 40 acre hay pasture that didn’t get cut before winter. So I turned the herd out on to it for winter, hoping they’d take care of it. Basically as a stockpiled pasture. Parts of it they did and parts they didn’t. A good deal of it was just picked through. I have to make hay on it this summer. It’s made up of fescue, Johnson grass, and lespedeza and whatever other native grasses we have in Oklahoma. So what should I do with the dormant grass that’s left on the field? I have my own hay equipment and a brush hog.

Guess I don't read it that way or I missed the turn when it went that direction.

Ive got a similar situation this year myself. Hay fields haven't been cut in two years and I need to try to replace some of what I fed this winter. Native meadows had 8 inch stubble with old 3 ft seed heads. Frozen off Bermuda was tall and thick. Fireant mounds 12 to 18 inches tall....I put the shredder across pretty low to clean up the stubble, knock the fireants down and chew up anything else that may be their.
 

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