stock trailer floor

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what type of wood is the best(also most cost effective) ie.. treated untreated, 2x10.2x12,etc
 

D.R. Cattle

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Mine has 2X6 treated with some kind of black tar or something, so I put rubber mats in. Work to take them out and clean, but lasts longer than the steel in the trailer. I'm highly disappointed in steel for stock trailer. I'll only buy aluminum when this one rots out. Cow piss and caca are tough on steel.
 

Campground Cattle

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D.R. Cattle":253gt9ls said:
Mine has 2X6 treated with some kind of black tar or something, so I put rubber mats in. Work to take them out and clean, but lasts longer than the steel in the trailer. I'm highly disappointed in steel for stock trailer. I'll only buy aluminum when this one rots out. Cow piss and caca are tough on steel.

Prefer the wood. I have found that after washing out and letting dry I spray down with diesel. This trailer has held up very well.
 

Jake

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We have a wood floor and have never replaced the floor since I was born. That's also the time they got it. We throw sand inside for footing and clean it out everyso often it's not really a religious practice to clean it out before unhooking it or anything like that.
 

TR

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I'm actually re-flooring in an old stock trailer right now, and I'm using treated 2X6's. Figured to just throw some mats in there for footing and cleaning ease, but am liking the diesal idea. Guess that would make it more "water" resistant?
 

Campground Cattle

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TR":38bm20z8 said:
I'm actually re-flooring in an old stock trailer right now, and I'm using treated 2X6's. Figured to just throw some mats in there for footing and cleaning ease, but am liking the diesal idea. Guess that would make it more "water" resistant?

Has worked well on my Hanover. The deisel has stopped the rust and corrosion of the steel and it keeps the wood treated. Stops the fungus that causes wood rot as well as waterproofing. As we all know that the enviroment is not very friendly.
 

jfont

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oldrosy":1x0ic0xr said:
what type of wood is the best(also most cost effective) ie.. treated untreated, 2x10.2x12,etc
Treated 2x10 boards running cross ways. You probably know that, but I know a guy that ran his long ways so it would save time on cutting. He finished quicker, but the animals would slip down more once they started peeing & pooing. Traction is'nt as good.
With treated boards these days it's a good idea to spray a coat of thompson's water seal once a year to help keep them in shape. Spraying the floor down with diesel sounds like a good idea too. Not just for the floor, but the metal around it.
 

Campground Cattle

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jfont":15zfjgcm said:
oldrosy":15zfjgcm said:
what type of wood is the best(also most cost effective) ie.. treated untreated, 2x10.2x12,etc
Treated 2x10 boards running cross ways. You probably know that, but I know a guy that ran his long ways so it would save time on cutting. He finished quicker, but the animals would slip down more once they started peeing & pooing. Traction is'nt as good.
With treated boards these days it's a good idea to spray a coat of thompson's water seal once a year to help keep them in shape. Spraying the floor down with diesel sounds like a good idea too. Not just for the floor, but the metal around it.

I stapled cattle panel to the floor provides excellent traction easy cleaninig with the water hose. I have seen mats get slippery also. The panel works stapled in with fence staples. I spray down everything inside with the diesel.
 

jfont

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Anonymous":1z3mm4zy said:
do you also cut tounge and groove for the joints
No, you don't want too thight of a fit. Traps moisture in the groove and will rot faster. Putting the boards in regular is the best way in my opinion. A small crack between the boards will allow drainage and they wont hold moisture between them. I wouldn't space cracks on a new floor, as the lumber ages it will do it on it's on.

Campgroung cattle: I agree with you on the cattle panel, it gives good footing. The best I've had in my trailer. The only problem I had with it is, I use the same trailer to haul my horses and I had a couple shoes that got caught under it and were pulled off. So I took it out and I ended up staggering some 1x4 slats on the floor.
 
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A

Anonymous

Of course if you want to do it only once and will live long enough to enjoy it, don't use lumber use Rumber - these are "boards" made from rubber. I have it in my Gooseneck brand trailer - it has 1/4 inch cracks between for easy washing out. Also it too is slippery, so I have a cattle panel on top.

I wash my trailer each and every time I use it - no ands ifs or buts. This is very good insurance that the manure and urine will not act on the metal.

Good trailering.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

There is a new type of trailer floor that is a man made board. I have seen it advertised in several publications yet I can not remember the brand name. I use old oil on the floor of the trailer where the boards meet the metal. Good results so far ours is a 91 model ans shows no sign of rust.
 

TLCfromARK

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If you change the direction the boards are running you may have to put some extra supports under the frame. We had two trailers we replaced the floors on. One we used treated 2X6's and ran them long ways and it's held up fine for 12 years. The other we replaced with with 2X8's but ran them cross ways on the trailer, they need to be replaced again after only 3 years. The only thing I saw was that the boards running the length of the trailer had supports every 3' or so but running cross way they were supported on the ends but not much in the middle.

Good luck. ;-)
 

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