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killingtime

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What do ya'll use to keep the algee(?) from building up in your water tanks so fast? I heard of putting some clorox in the tank but I don't know how much.
 

Running Arrow Bill

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We use the "blue-green" dye. Available as concentrated liquid or packages of crystals. Some farm & ranch stores handle it. Otherwise, go to "Aquacide" or "Algaecide" search.

The highly concentrated dye blocks photosynthesis. It is safe for all forms of animals and even for humans using it in a pool (according to label info I've read).

Additionally, we use a pool skimmer net to skim out chunks of algae when it is found.
 

SRBeef

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killingtime":lxce4l5l said:
What do ya'll use to keep the algee(?) from building up in your water tanks so fast? I heard of putting some clorox in the tank but I don't know how much.

I use a "shock treatment" in my concrete waterer once of twice a summer. At a time when no cattle will be using the waterer for a couple hours (I close a gate to make sure they don't use it):

#1 I drain the waterer
#2 I pour about a quart of chlorine bleach into the maybe 15 gal of water in my waterer as it refills.
#3 Swish/brush this, leave full for an hour or two.
#4 drain after about 2 hours, refill with clean water add a cup of bleach, brush it all over, drain this out. Rinse
#5 refill with clean water

The tank will still smell a bit like bleach and cows may avoid it for awhile but they will come back. This process has kept mine fairly free of algae etc for a couple months at a time. jmho.

Jim
 

TexasBred

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Drop a little copper sulfate into the waterer. Works really well and gives your cattle a little dose of copper as well.
 

LoveMoo11

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Drain it once in a while and scrub it is what I do. The goldfish idea is interesting.
 
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killingtime

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Thanks for all the helpful info! I was referring to the plastic and metal tanks.

Currently I have been cleaning them out, but it seems they as dirty as before I started in two days.

I think I will try the clorox first and see how that works since I have it around the house already.

Thanks.
 

novaman

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I was just looking through my Dairy Health USA catalog and they have organic barley straw advertised as an aid in keeping algae out of tanks. According to the description the straw begins to decay and release lignin into the water. This lignin supposedly keeps algae from growing in the water. Sounds quite fishy :lol2: but if it works it would be cheap and (for me anyways) readily available.
 

msscamp

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denoginnizer":2hzz6opk said:
I have had pretty good results using goldfish.

We've done that, too. I've wondered about putting a Plecky(sorry, can't pronounce or spell the full name) or two in the bigger tanks, but I'm thinking they won't survive our winters. They might work for you, though.
 

dun

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msscamp":ynef1ixo said:
denoginnizer":ynef1ixo said:
I have had pretty good results using goldfish.

We've done that, too. I've wondered about putting a Plecky(sorry, can't pronounce or spell the full name) or two in the bigger tanks, but I'm thinking they won't survive our winters. They might work for you, though.
Would those be plecostomus?
 

hyp7

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Do you have just alge or moss? If it is stringy moss you can use a steel rod or car antenna in a cordless drill.
It will wrap up any vegitation around it. Just reverse the drill and it will slide off. I have been using this method in my pond for 5 years and it works good.
Also copper sulfate never goes away it will accumalate over time and never go away. I was going to try it in my pond but research told me that after a few years I wouldnt be able to keep fish in my pond.
Guys in a warmer climate can get talipa fish it thrives on alge and moss.
Just a thought
Gene
 

TexasBred

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hyp7":h1eobl5b said:
Do you have just alge or moss? If it is stringy moss you can use a steel rod or car antenna in a cordless drill.
It will wrap up any vegitation around it. Just reverse the drill and it will slide off. I have been using this method in my pond for 5 years and it works good.
Also copper sulfate never goes away it will accumalate over time and never go away. I was going to try it in my pond but research told me that after a few years I wouldnt be able to keep fish in my pond.
Guys in a warmer climate can get talipa fish it thrives on alge and moss.
Just a thought
Gene

Certain parts of Texas adding copper sulfate to the water is one of the few ways to get adequate copper into cattle....area have huge amounts of iron in the soil which binds the copper....and it rids the pond of the algae..the same for water troughs...I've used the gold fish but seems all they ate was any feed particles left on the mouth of the cow.
 
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killingtime

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I just have algae, no moss. I've been trying the clorox and it seems to be working well. I was wondering though- When using an automatic waterer how do you know how much water the cows are drinking? Mine has no metering device and I was wondering how I'm supposed to know how much they are drinking so I can add the clorox accordingly.
 

hillsdown

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novaman":tekdlbst said:
I was just looking through my Dairy Health USA catalog and they have organic barley straw advertised as an aid in keeping algae out of tanks. According to the description the straw begins to decay and release lignin into the water. This lignin supposedly keeps algae from growing in the water. Sounds quite fishy :lol2: but if it works it would be cheap and (for me anyways) readily available.


Actually this is not a joke, works great even in dug outs, grind it up and shoot it in. Works on blue (the killer) algae as well.
 

SRBeef

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killingtime":2r7ou2ht said:
I just have algae, no moss. I've been trying the clorox and it seems to be working well. I was wondering though- When using an automatic waterer how do you know how much water the cows are drinking? Mine has no metering device and I was wondering how I'm supposed to know how much they are drinking so I can add the clorox accordingly.

You can only add so much bleach based on the waterer static capacity, not daily consumption, or you will be too high.
 

msscamp

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killingtime":dyhwodpe said:
I just have algae, no moss. I've been trying the clorox and it seems to be working well. I was wondering though- When using an automatic waterer how do you know how much water the cows are drinking? Mine has no metering device and I was wondering how I'm supposed to know how much they are drinking so I can add the clorox accordingly.

If memory serves, the average cow consumes roughly 25 gallons of water per day - you can google it to make sure that is correct since my memory is not always what it should be. If it is correct, that and the knowledge of how many gallons your waterer holds will tell you how often the water is turned over completely - add the bleach accordingly. I don't think I would worry about adding the bleach during the winter. The days are shorter, and the temps are not as high so the algae is generally not a problem - especially in colder climates. I hope this helps! :)
 

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