Steel Rope for working pens

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Pablo

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I have a 40' x 80' working area that needs to be redone. It is currently portable panels wired between telephone pole posts spread 10' apart. I have a source for used, galvanized 3/4" highway median cable for a real good price. Does anyone have any advice on using or not using cable to build pens?
 

Bright Raven

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I never seen it. The standard is something firm that they can not get tangled in. Under pressure, even docile cattle will test the walls. Cable would be dangerous IMO.
 

ALACOWMAN

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Pablo":1toc3hox said:
I have a 40' x 80' working area that needs to be redone. It is currently portable panels wired between telephone pole posts spread 10' apart. I have a source for used, galvanized 3/4" highway median cable for a real good price. Does anyone have any advice on using or not using cable to build pens?
The more daylight they can see.. The more of it they want to see..it would have to be spaced real close together.and pulled tighter than a wedge to work..might be ok to use as a deterrent around the top, a couple runs
 
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Pablo

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My idea was to string the cables (wire rope) at 8" intervals starting 8" above ground up to a height of 6 feet. Each strand would be under tension by using spring turnbuckles to keep it nice and tight. Does that make any difference in anyone's opinion, or still too dangerous?
 

Caustic Burno

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Pablo":2ntctbnu said:
My idea was to string the cables (wire rope) at 8" intervals starting 8" above ground up to a height of 6 feet. Each strand would be under tension by using spring turnbuckles to keep it nice and tight. Does that make any difference in anyone's opinion, or still too dangerous?


I think that would be a bad train wreck sooner or later.
 

ALACOWMAN

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Springs ? Be To much give, calf could just plow right through it..turnbuckles yes.. Are you going to drill holes in the posts,and weave it through em?
 

Bigfoot

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I'm always the opposite-------I believe I'd try it, especially if it's cheap. I'd put it close, and may even draw a strand of barbed wire between each one. Might keep em from getting their head between the rope.

Edited to add:
I'd weld a 1" nut to a lag screw, and run it through that.
 

callmefence

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Pablo":2x2l19ft said:
My idea was to string the cables (wire rope) at 8" intervals starting 8" above ground up to a height of 6 feet. Each strand would be under tension by using spring turnbuckles to keep it nice and tight. Does that make any difference in anyone's opinion, or still too dangerous?

Just Fine for trap. Not for the actual working facility.

There's nothing inherently dangerous about cable. It makes a good fence and is probably safer than just about anything there is. That's why horse folks love it . You use garage door springs on long runs to allow for contracting with weather. On a trap use a big turnbuckle. You can get it so tight it won't give at all. For fasteners we use the weld on clips. I weld one end of a 18 inch turnbuckle to the post and attach the cable with cable clamps. Generally have a pipe top rail. It will put a serious strain on braces if you don't have a top rail.


https://www.ebay.com/i/222521462275?chn ... 6247374640
 

wbvs58

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I've seen it used a lot in Australia very successfully mainly for outer yards and bull pens. It is best with a top rail as that stops the posts from being pulled in. Buying turnbuckles and fittings can be expensive but you can bypass that with a bit of ingenuity. I have the materials to do the outer yards at my bull paddock and have bought cyclone rod for houses which is very cheap and is 12mm threaded rod in lengths about 3 metres, I cut to length and weld a cut chain link to one end for the cable and the rod goes through the post and a nut and large washer to then strain the wire up. I cut about 25mm lengths of suitable pipe (I'll help you out a bit here 1") to slip over the doubled wire to keep them together and the bend tight and then just 1 wire grip. Needless to say keeping the cable tight is the key.

Here are some photos of some examples I just googled.

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=catt ... 66&bih=662

Ken
 
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Pablo

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Original Poster here to answer some question that have be asked. I was thinking of having the cable go through the post at each end, then strung on the inside of the in-between posts (cow side) through I or J hooks so that the whole line could be tightened at once. I agree pipe rail on top is required to keep the post from being pulled together. This would be for the perimeter of the facility only, not for crowding areas or chutes.

I am appreciating all the feedback. Good ideas on the "ingenuity" help.
 

Bright Raven

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jerry27150":3dpomcp6 said:
some will surely get their legs through. not fun getting them back out, if they don't break leg they will get cut up.

That is what I wondered. Even with corral panels, I have had calves get their legs through. It can cause some anxiety when you see one hung up by a leg. Where I crowd, I got solid walls.

I might have misunderstood. If this is retaining pens, might be ok. But not for crowding pens.
 
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Pablo

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"This would be for the perimeter of the facility only, not for crowding areas or chutes."

Crowding pens and chute would be of other materials. What do ya think?
 

Bright Raven

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Pablo":3gyyhjs4 said:
"This would be for the perimeter of the facility only, not for crowding areas or chutes."

Crowding pens and chute would be of other materials. What do ya think?

It's basically a fence. My concern is where cattle are crowded, get anxious, confused, and start looking for escape routes. I have had calves get their legs between the rails of the corral panels when I am working them on halter. It can get stressful. On the perimeter, should be fine.
 

tnwalkingred

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They use this type of cable under heavy tension at the local sale barn in the ring. There is a welded pipe frame and the cable is used between. It's super tight and I don't think there is anyway an animal can get though it.
 

cjmc

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The perimeter fence and holding pens in one of our working facilitates is made from cable (the post are 2in pipe). It's worked well for probably 20 years or more. One major difference is that this cable was from the oil field & is probably 2 inches in diameter, which is obviously a big difference.
 

Dave

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The old sale yard at Centralia WA the ring was made of cable. I have seen it tried a lot of times. Never saw a single injury. Not one ever get tangled up. No matter how tight you stretch cable it will have some give to it. Keeping post close together will help make it work.
 

Bright Raven

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I prefer solid walls in the areas of a facility where cattle are crowded such as the crowding pen just before you force them into the sweep tub and the sweep tub. Most high end sweep tubs and alley ways are now sheeted. Unfortunately, mine is not. I have never had an adult animal get a leg through the bars of my sweep tub, but I have had it occur with calves. In fact, about a month ago, I ran calves into the sweep tub to halter them, and one got a leg between the bars. It was a devil of a time getting it out with 13 other calves jumping around me.
 

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