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Steel building installation

JMJ Farms

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I own/operate a residential construction company. We do a little bit of light commercial construction. I want to venture into steel building construction. My grandfather and father put one up about 12 years ago and I helped them some but I had other full time obligations. That's all the experience I have with steel buildings. From my limited experience I recall that we ordered the building, set the anchor bolts according to reccomendations, and bolted it together. Is there more that I missed? Do I need some kind of formal training? Do I need a special license or certification? Where do I order the materials? Do I need to find one manufacturer to deal with? Who's the best? How do you charge? Any input would be appreciated. I don't really know which direction is the best to go in. I've got plenty of common sense and I'm sure I can figure it out but I certainly don't mind asking others for ideas and information that will make the venture easier. There is a need in my area for the service because I've had a hard time trying to find someone to install one for me. So I figured I would do my own and then offer the service along with my regular business.
 

BobbyLummus1

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I'm in the process of deciding , I have decided on a red iron building . Looks like 3 steps . Material , foundation/slab, and erection . I'm planning 40x60x14 with two 12x12 roll up doors . prices have been all over the place , Leaning towards getting a kit , paying a erector , and getting slab from 3 different sources
 

True Grit Farms

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Your to dang busy now, " you only have one life, and it won't last forever " Enjoy your family while you can, your health and happiness isn't guaranteed.
 

M-5

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I'll get you a number to a place here that you can buy everything from. All you should need would be normal county required permits . the buildings will have engineered drawings and stamps.
 

JMJ Farms

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True Grit Farms":1mimeg6o said:
Your to dang busy now, " you only have one life, and it won't last forever " Enjoy your family while you can, your health and happiness isn't guaranteed.

I know TG. And I certainly agree. But I figure I better work hard while I'm able. I want to be able to retire one day if I love long enough. And it may be a dream, and certainly not guaranteed, but I hope my business can continue to grow to the point where it can support me and my three kids one day. I know what they say about the 'best laid plans' but I still gotta try.

M-5":1mimeg6o said:
I'll get you a number to a place here that you can buy everything from. All you should need would be normal county required permits . the buildings will have engineered drawings and stamps.

I would appreciate that Darryl.
 

Caustic Burno

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JMJ Farms":206dwhk5 said:
I own/operate a residential construction company. We do a little bit of light commercial construction. I want to venture into steel building construction. My grandfather and father put one up about 12 years ago and I helped them some but I had other full time obligations. That's all the experience I have with steel buildings. From my limited experience I recall that we ordered the building, set the anchor bolts according to reccomendations, and bolted it together. Is there more that I missed? Do I need some kind of formal training? Do I need a special license or certification? Where do I order the materials? Do I need to find one manufacturer to deal with? Who's the best? How do you charge? Any input would be appreciated. I don't really know which direction is the best to go in. I've got plenty of common sense and I'm sure I can figure it out but I certainly don't mind asking others for ideas and information that will make the venture easier. There is a need in my area for the service because I've had a hard time trying to find someone to install one for me. So I figured I would do my own and then offer the service along with my regular business.

Quite a few steel homes here built by a contractor that used to build stick.
Classic and Kodiak are the majority around here. My home and out buildings are all steel biggest thing I see is having a great concrete man cause when the steel rolls in it is fabricated to exact measurements.
The foundation bolts are long and set way down in concrete.
When the steel comes in they will have a crane and have all the red iron bolted down in a couple days.
Some of the challenges in windows and doors is all the exterior walls on my house are ten inches thick.
Here is what it looked like going up.

I don't know about today my house the steel was made to our design it wasn't one of the kit homes.

 

1982vett

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JMJ Farms":3v959z6j said:
I own/operate a residential construction company. We do a little bit of light commercial construction. I want to venture into steel building construction. My grandfather and father put one up about 12 years ago and I helped them some but I had other full time obligations. That's all the experience I have with steel buildings. From my limited experience I recall that we ordered the building, set the anchor bolts according to reccomendations, and bolted it together. Is there more that I missed? Do I need some kind of formal training? Do I need a special license or certification? Where do I order the materials? Do I need to find one manufacturer to deal with? Who's the best? How do you charge? Any input would be appreciated. I don't really know which direction is the best to go in. I've got plenty of common sense and I'm sure I can figure it out but I certainly don't mind asking others for ideas and information that will make the venture easier. There is a need in my area for the service because I've had a hard time trying to find someone to install one for me. So I figured I would do my own and then offer the service along with my regular business.
Cheaper buildings are just that....cheaper and less likely to be accurate on deminsions. Lighter steel and lighter sheeting panels. But with that being said and as stated, the come with engineering specs.

Back in the late 70's I worked for a company that put up Butler Manufacturing buildings. They came pre punched down to the wall and roofing screws. All you needed to understand was plumb, level and square in addition to knowing how to read a tape and drawings. Worked on some other brand name buildings also. Steel was generally ok, but when it came down to sheeting you had to be vigilant. Some types were shy of covering 3 ft and others would cover a little more. Keeping them running plumb/square and on centers was harder and more labor intensive.
 

talltimber

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There used to be some folks in Tuscumbia/Muscle Shoals area, Bigbees, that sold red iron buildings. A few in this area have bought one, Bigbee sent a crew for installs. That might be a source of complete kits/info for you.
 

wbvs58

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If it is just steel frame sheds, the only difference between me and a professional putting one up is one shed. You just need that one for experience to get all the sheeting right where it finishes and the trim all neat and right and the your good to go.

As far as steel frame houses go they are no different to build than a wood frame. The biggest thing is the precision and accuracy of the steel. If the foundations aren't square and level then they just won't go together. I built a steel frame house myself about 10 years ago and like CB it wasn't a kit it was to my design and when I put the frame up I got from the factory it was very precise, if something did not quite fit, it was in the wrong place. The cabinet maker was surprised at how square everything was.

Ken
 

JMJ Farms

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I appreciate all the replies. I've got plumb, level, and square down. No worries there. I want to actually do the installing. So based on what I've gathered here, the only thing I need that I don't have is a crane or a shooting boom or some type of lift to set the trusses and work off of. Only other thing needed would be wrenches and sockets and possibly a torch and welder. Sounds pretty much like building a house. Get the foundation right and everything else will fall in place. I'm not wanting to build steel frame houses. More interested in shops and hay barns and equipment sheds for now.
 

jedstivers

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JMJ Farms":6gljdi7l said:
I appreciate all the replies. I've got plumb, level, and square down. No worries there. I want to actually do the installing. So based on what I've gathered here, the only thing I need that I don't have is a crane or a shooting boom or some type of lift to set the trusses and work off of. Only other thing needed would be wrenches and sockets and possibly a torch and welder. Sounds pretty much like building a house. Get the foundation right and everything else will fall in place. I'm not wanting to build steel frame houses. More interested in shops and hay barns and equipment sheds for now.
A telehandler will be do almost all your jobs. Only be some really big ones you'll need a crane for.
Now with cordless impacts and drills you can really go fast. And yes a good torch and welder.
 

Caustic Burno

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JMJ Farms":3kndl5cw said:
I appreciate all the replies. I've got plumb, level, and square down. No worries there. I want to actually do the installing. So based on what I've gathered here, the only thing I need that I don't have is a crane or a shooting boom or some type of lift to set the trusses and work off of. Only other thing needed would be wrenches and sockets and possibly a torch and welder. Sounds pretty much like building a house. Get the foundation right and everything else will fall in place. I'm not wanting to build steel frame houses. More interested in shops and hay barns and equipment sheds for now.
The steel on my my house at roof top is thirty feet. House is engineered for sustained 160 mph winds.
Steel homes vary greatly as I have seen some pretty light kits to heavy I beam on custom jobs
 

Caustic Burno

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wbvs58":30ud033e said:
If it is just steel frame sheds, the only difference between me and a professional putting one up is one shed. You just need that one for experience to get all the sheeting right where it finishes and the trim all neat and right and the your good to go.

As far as steel frame houses go they are no different to build than a wood frame. The biggest thing is the precision and accuracy of the steel. If the foundations aren't square and level then they just won't go together. I built a steel frame house myself about 10 years ago and like CB it wasn't a kit it was to my design and when I put the frame up I got from the factory it was very precise, if something did not quite fit, it was in the wrong place. The cabinet maker was surprised at how square everything was.

Ken

What I am still am amazed at is everything is still square after 12 years no cracks in Sheetrock as stick homes as the years go by.
I had heck with a piece of transition between roof lines for a year or so until we came up with a permanent solution
I do like the locking roof better with no screws that option was not thought of when I built or available.
 

JMJ Farms

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jedstivers":30b2lrzq said:
JMJ Farms":30b2lrzq said:
I appreciate all the replies. I've got plumb, level, and square down. No worries there. I want to actually do the installing. So based on what I've gathered here, the only thing I need that I don't have is a crane or a shooting boom or some type of lift to set the trusses and work off of. Only other thing needed would be wrenches and sockets and possibly a torch and welder. Sounds pretty much like building a house. Get the foundation right and everything else will fall in place. I'm not wanting to build steel frame houses. More interested in shops and hay barns and equipment sheds for now.
A telehandler will be do almost all your jobs. Only be some really big ones you'll need a crane for.
Now with cordless impacts and drills you can really go fast. And yes a good torch and welder.

A telehandler is what I was referring to as a shooting boom. Not sure why that's just what I've heard them called before. Very handy piece of equipment. What do they run in $ Jed? $20k? $30k? I've got everything else I need except experience, and they say bought experience is the best so I will let y'all know how it works out :???:
 

Caustic Burno

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JMJ Farms":2wzy83re said:
jedstivers":2wzy83re said:
Oh I have no idea. You can rent them easy though.

That thought crossed my mind. That's definitely the way to go. At least for a little while.

That is what the guy here does he said the biggest headache is timiming having the crane for the semis.
He said there are demiurge charges if you aren't ready.
On my house there were two semis of steel rolled up all the driver did was unsteap the load. His crew had to do all the rigging. He had a nice spot cleared for a lay down yard and worked the steel from there including any of the prefab.
All the electrical is run in conduit if you have problem your not pulling regular wire through the steel studs.
There were some other things with plumbing as well and rubber grommets
 

bbirder

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This is what they used to erect my last building. It is a powered elevator or scaffold. They used it to lift beam,align and bolt. It is also useful as a scaffold for sheeting the bldg and installing insulation. I erected my first building myself and vowed that would be my last. The installers around here quote $4.00 sq/ft to erect not including the slab.


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