South Devon

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Australian Cattleman

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Yes I love them. Have been breeding them now for 16 years. Join them to Brahman to breed South Brahvon and to Angus to breed Australis.We also join them to Hereford and Black Baldy. We also breed purebreds,their temperament and weight gains are second to none. The cows have stacks of rich milk.They tolerate various climates. Checkout http://www.southdevonbeefcattle.com.au and look at our web page Chevalley. You will see a cross with the Brahman and some purebreds.
Colin
 

cypressfarms

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Australian Cattleman":1wgowxll said:
Yes I love them. Have been breeding them now for 16 years. Join them to Brahman to breed South Brahvon and to Angus to breed Australis.We also join them to Hereford and Black Baldy. We also breed purebreds,their temperament and weight gains are second to none. The cows have stacks of rich milk.They tolerate various climates. Checkout http://www.southdevonbeefcattle.com.au and look at our web page Chevalley. You will see a cross with the Brahman and some purebreds.
Colin

Colin, that's some fine looking cattle on the website.
 

BA

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They are a good breed. From your location in NE Texas, the closest breeder is Scott Bollenbach at Kingfisher, OK. His cattle are arguably the best in the breed. You can get info. at http://www.southdevon.com (US Assoc.) Colin was right about the temperment and quality of the breed.
 

DOC HARRIS

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BA":3rcz3lxe said:
They are a good breed. From your location in NE Texas, the closest breeder is Scott Bollenbach at Kingfisher, OK. His cattle are arguably the best in the breed. You can get info. at http://www.southdevon.com (US Assoc.) Colin was right about the temperment and quality of the breed.
I must admit, until today, I had not investigated the specifics of the South Devon Breed any more than to read a smattering of comments regarding them. Today, I downloaded the information supplied by the breed association and carefully read all the data therein. If what is presented by MARC and the Feedlots denoted, The South Devon Breed is a very high quality Beef Breed and in my opinion justifies any breeder's consideration for cross-breeding heterosis being introduced into their herd. One of the most interesting threads was the section on F-1 Crosses and the increase in gain available through hybrid vigor -and the F-2 crosses offering additional growth benefits. Very interesting reading!

DOC HARRIS
 

docgraybull

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My father has raised South Devons since 1980. Initially registered cattle, then commercial, and for the past 8 years or so, various levels of crossing with Angus. They live up to their nickname "Gentle Giants". All of the following are generalities regarding my experience with South Devons. They are moderate to large framed cattle with good bone structure and good feet. His cows have ranged from about 1100 pounds up to 1700 pounds. Can't recall any history of eye problems. They are very docile and are a pleasure to work with in the pens and in the chute. They are good heavy milkers and good mothers. They have crossed very well with the Angus bulls. The steers grow out well and the heifers kept for replacements have performed nicely as mama cows as well. The steers that he kept and fed out over the years have made excellent freezer beef.

With the registered cattle, he did have some calving difficulties: few pulls, few C-sections. But since using Angus bulls on the cows - can't recall any calving problems except for one calf that had to be pulled 4 or 5 years ago, due to breech presentation. Easy pull, calf lived. The registered cattle tended to have more udder breakdown/relaxation than one would expect also. Once again this has virtually been eliminated with the crossbreeding.

Our winters and summers in Northeastern Oklahoma are not particularly severe, but they would hair up well in the winter and slick off nicely in the summer and they are reportedly very adaptable to climate extremes. Overall, a very functional breed with good muscling and growth, good milking ability, etc. and the short list of "bad" traits seemed to be virtually eliminated by a sensible crossbreeding program.
 
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norriscathy

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Thanks for all of yall's input. I talked to Scott today and am working with him on a couple of bulls. He is no fly by nighter! Runs 500 cows and has been breeding strictly South Devons for over 15 years with a 40 years in the cattle business. A good man to talk to. Hopefully this will allow me to keep the pounds with my Gelbvieh and improve tenderness at the same time. A perfect solution? We'll go slow and keep you posted.
Thanks again!
 

ollie'

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Cathy why do you prefer South Devon to Red Angus? Just curious.
 
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norriscathy

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ollie'":lrra1vzx said:
Cathy why do you prefer South Devon to Red Angus? Just curious.

We started with black Angus cattle 30 years ago. Blacks just did not do well here. With only 100 or cows we had almost 20 babies on bottles at one time. Calves just not strong. Found one of our Gelbviehs dead with prolapse one morning. Ten minutues later we found a newborn calf chasing the four wheeler looking for something to eat. Love the vigor of the calves. When we first started thing about cross breeding several years ago; we bought 2 red agus bulls from Leachman. The bulls were so wild we could barely get them off the truck. Never could clam them done. Shipped them to the sale barn without ever letting them breed a cow. Angus in general just seem a lot more flighty than Gelbvieh. The vet complains that the Gelbvieh are too calm, he can't get them through the chute fast enough!
 

BA

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Cathy - On the South Devon website, the first two cows you see (one has a calf) are from Scott's herd. You will be pleased to work with Scott. We have purchased five or six bulls from him through the years and bought a bunch of heifers from him in the early 90's. He's a good breeder and a good person. He will cull anything that ever throws a horn gene and doesn't put up with udder problems. We've bought from others and have had an occasional udder problem, but never any problems from his cattle due to his consistant culling for that trait.

Brian Axtell
 

BA

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Ollie - They are a great cross on Red Angus. We have registered herds of each and cross breed them also. They are as good of full english cross as you can get in my opinion.
 

ollie'

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norriscathy":3ppw9n90 said:
ollie'":3ppw9n90 said:
Cathy why do you prefer South Devon to Red Angus? Just curious.

We started with black Angus cattle 30 years ago. Blacks just did not do well here. With only 100 or cows we had almost 20 babies on bottles at one time. Calves just not strong. Found one of our Gelbviehs dead with prolapse one morning. Ten minutues later we found a newborn calf chasing the four wheeler looking for something to eat. Love the vigor of the calves. When we first started thing about cross breeding several years ago; we bought 2 red agus bulls from Leachman. The bulls were so wild we could barely get them off the truck. Never could clam them done. Shipped them to the sale barn without ever letting them breed a cow. Angus in general just seem a lot more flighty than Gelbvieh. The vet complains that the Gelbvieh are too calm, he can't get them through the chute fast enough!
Thanks Cathy. I appreciate your reply. From my experience I would say your experience with the Red Angus bulls is different than mine but I understand your reservations. Good luck with the Devons. I think Bryan gave you knowledgable advise. In my opinion on any seedstock purchase I would first want to know the breeder was a knowledgable , honest person. Seems like Bryan has knowledge of the breeder in this case. That would go a long way with me. Still , I like to look at mothers when buying bulls if I intend to keep heifers.
 

ollie'

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BA":3gpa9g5p said:
Ollie - They are a great cross on Red Angus. We have registered herds of each and cross breed them also. They are as good of full english cross as you can get in my opinion.
I have always liked South Devons. I have seen some different problems but my knowledge is limited to the show stock. I do admire their REA size from what I have seen and I hear they marble well.
 

dun

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norriscathy":2594jcsy said:
ollie'":2594jcsy said:
Cathy why do you prefer South Devon to Red Angus? Just curious.

When we first started thing about cross breeding several years ago; we bought 2 red agus bulls from Leachman. The bulls were so wild we could barely get them off the truck.

We've had the same experience with animals from places that genreally only work the cattle by horseback or 4wheeler and are hoorahed too much when they're first exposed. The only cows we've ever had that seriously tried to kill me was a Brangus that had been brought in from the range and tranqed, one was a weanling Hereford heifer that thought I'ld loo kbetter squeezed through the corral, the other was a Red Angus Gelbvieh cross. She was the only nut case we got from those people. Her sire was too layed back, to get him to stand so I could get a look at him I finally had to have the owner twist his tail and I slapped him in the face with my cap.
You run into loonys in every breed, but a lot of it has to do with how they;re handled originally.

dun
 
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