soil sample results

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cowman82

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got 10 fields done last week. results are interesting. looks like i'm needing lime pretty bad.

These are all pasture fields.

PH ranges from 5.0 - 5.9

P ranges from 44 - 114

K ranges from 300 - 415

calcium from 1000 - 2000

Magnesium - 300 - 400

Organic matter all were 3.7% - 4.9% except one was 2.7%



looks like lime is needed pretty bad.
 
Do you know the analysis method and units they report in? This is from VA DCR. Each row is the same soil P level as reported by different labs. As you can see numbers that are quite different can mean the the same thing.

1716491177337.png
 
Do you know the analysis method and units they report in? This is from VA DCR. Each row is the same soil P level as reported by different labs. As you can see numbers that are quite different can mean the the same thing.

View attachment 45029

Thanks for posting that.

I'm used to ppm, but this new place I tried does it in LBS./per acre.

the only thing I can find is its the Bray 1 test? Its missouri state.
 
got 10 fields done last week. results are interesting. looks like i'm needing lime pretty bad.

These are all pasture fields.

PH ranges from 5.0 - 5.9

P ranges from 44 - 114

K ranges from 300 - 415

calcium from 1000 - 2000

Magnesium - 300 - 400

Organic matter all were 3.7% - 4.9% except one was 2.7%



looks like lime is needed pretty bad.
Is the P and K numbers what are available or what's needed for the pasture?
Yes, lime is definitely needed.
 
PPM is just half of #/acre so that's pretty simple but you have to know which one. I found this in a fact sheet from Ohio State.

1716494551354.png
Your 44 would be ~59 MIII, depending on units, the Virginia Tech lab would say you are just above sufficient (no crop response from application) if PPM or they would rate as H- in #/acre, and would have a minimal recommendation. Out of curiosity I'd check with the local extension or the lab and and maybe a local fert dealer just to see what they recommend but like the others said it looks like your money would be better spent on the lime.
 
Is the P and K numbers what are available or what's needed for the pasture?
Yes, lime is definitely needed.
its what available.

PPM is just half of #/acre so that's pretty simple but you have to know which one. I found this in a fact sheet from Ohio State.

View attachment 45031
Your 44 would be ~59 MIII, depending on units, the Virginia Tech lab would say you are just above sufficient (no crop response from application) if PPM or they would rate as H- in #/acre, and would have a minimal recommendation. Out of curiosity I'd check with the local extension or the lab and and maybe a local fert dealer just to see what they recommend but like the others said it looks like your money would be better spent on the lime.

it says everything is high, very high, or excess. Recommendations are listed, mostly its 160 units N and lime. These are just pastures my cattle are grazing i'm not looking into putting a bunch of fert on them as I unroll a lot of bales on them every winter. But I do need to get that PH up.
 
Thats a lot of N for summer pasture.
I agree. 160 # of nitrogen per acre? At least half would be wasted here, especially this time of year. Recommended nitrogen on fescue pasture here is about 100# per year split between fall and spring with no more than 60 per application. Maybe he is putting it on Bermuda, but seems like too much for one application. Don't know grass type, so I may be way off.
 
its what available.



it says everything is high, very high, or excess. Recommendations are listed, mostly its 160 units N and lime. These are just pastures my cattle are grazing i'm not looking into putting a bunch of fert on them as I unroll a lot of bales on them every winter. But I do need to get that PH up.
I would spend on nothing but lime for now. Once you get your PH to 6.2-6.7 anything you add will respond much better.
 
You will have to check on lime in your area.The main cost of lime is trucking .I can get it for $17 a ton but still have to spread it . Some places rent lime buggy's so you can do it yourself. If someone local there has a lime truck they will have a set price per ton to spread .
 
Its from $28 to $35 here spread. If you have more than one option there can be a difference in the buffering effect of lime. Each place that sells it should have a sheet on it. A lime might be as much as 15% more or less effective according to the base rock.
Clinchvalley86 has a lime near him that is a byproduct of a Zinc mine. Its way better than any other we can buy here.
 

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