Soil and fertilizer question

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jrn28

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So last year I did a soil test on my pasture and wheat field. Both came out about the same, my soil is mod. Alkaline ph is 7.8. Last year I bought a nitrogen/phosphorus blend. I took my results to the fertilizer plant and told them that I wanted to hit it with a 50/50 blend. I was sold 21-0-0 ammonium sulfate and a 18-46-0. My question is does ammonium sulfate help bring down my ph? Or is it just N? I was told that bermuda and wheat both need lower ph. What can I do to bring down my ph? Any Info would be greatly apreciated.
 

TexasBred

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It will lower it temporarily but not permanently. You might begin adding some sulfur to your fertilizer mix. :shock: :shock: Don't tell SirLoin I recommended sulfur for anything.
 
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jrn28

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Thanks texasbred. Another question on the results it asked for 60lbs of P i spread 50lb, I know a lot goes into factor but, how much stays in the ground? Will it get to the point where I have to throw less?
 

runningr

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Once you build up to where you need to be all you will have to apply is whatever you pull off as long as its in an available form, by that I mean as long as its not tied up
Phosphorus (P) and potash(K) do not leach like nitrogen (N) but phosphorus will tie up and can become bound and unavailable for uptake, there are P stabilizers available, such as avail and prevent there are applied to map(11-56-0) or dap(18-46-0) they help but based on what I have seen the prevent is more reliable avail can be unsuccessful if zinc levels are low. I am basing this off results ive seen in row crops
 

novatech

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Going outside the box you may want to check out Mycorrhizal fungi. It is usually [present in native pastures. In pasture where tillage has been frequent, or large amounts of fertilizer have been applied it is often killed. Mycorrhizal fungi extracts the phosphorus from the soil where it is normally tied up. The fungus lives within the root and forms a symbiotic relationship with the plant.
http://www.agbio-inc.com/mycorrhizae-faq.html
 
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