So tiny! Why?

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J Hoy

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Just drop em off at my place. I'll post pics when I wean him.... 😀

And who checks a calf's bite when its born???
Well, everyone should if they can. Underbite on a calf will keep it from gaining weight properly because they can't graze efficiently after they are weaned. Underbite is pretty much epidemic in cattle and goats. Just type underbite domestic calves images on Google and lots of photos come up of all breeds of calves with underbite. The same if you do that with goats or horse foals, etc.
 

J Hoy

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BTW, I honestly can't tell if he has an underbite. Doesn't look like it up close or when he sucks my finger or nurses. I got nuthin'.
The way to check a bite is to lift the lips apart while the mouth is closed and see if the lower incisors contact the dental pad or are completely in front of the dental pad. On ruminants, like cattle, goats, sheep, etc. all of the lower incisors have to directly contact the dental pad a bit less than a quarter inch behind the front of the dental pad (on a little newborn) so that when the animal grows up and bites on foliage it will break off and then be eaten. If the grazing animal has an underbite, the grass or foliage slides out between the forward incisors and the front of the dental pad. I learned all that when I was about 8 years old in 4-H many years ago.
 

J Hoy

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The way to check a bite is to lift the lips apart while the mouth is closed and see if the lower incisors contact the dental pad or are completely in front of the dental pad. On ruminants, like cattle, goats, sheep, etc. all of the lower incisors have to directly contact the dental pad a bit less than a quarter inch behind the front of the dental pad (on a little newborn) so that when the animal grows up and bites on foliage it will break off and then be eaten. If the grazing animal has an underbite, the grass or foliage slides out between the forward incisors and the front of the dental pad. I learned all that when I was about 8 years old in 4-H many years ago.
I checked my files for fairly recent manganese studies and found this concerning manganese deficiency in beef calves - includes failure to thrive, inability to get up and follow the mother, and underdeveloped upper facial bones (Hansen et al., 2006)
 

wbvs58

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The way to check a bite is to lift the lips apart while the mouth is closed and see if the lower incisors contact the dental pad or are completely in front of the dental pad. On ruminants, like cattle, goats, sheep, etc. all of the lower incisors have to directly contact the dental pad a bit less than a quarter inch behind the front of the dental pad (on a little newborn) so that when the animal grows up and bites on foliage it will break off and then be eaten. If the grazing animal has an underbite, the grass or foliage slides out between the forward incisors and the front of the dental pad. I learned all that when I was about 8 years old in 4-H many years ago.
Exactly J Hoy yet you are diagnosing a bad bite without even handling the calf, just the perceived appearance to you in a photo.

Ken
 
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TCRanch

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Well, I let them join the herd and he's a little maniac, playing with the other calves until he's exhausted. Maybe wishful thinking, but mama seems to look better already.

I don't think he has an underbite, but will watch his progress and check them both out thoroughly in a couple weeks when we work the entire herd.

Thank you for the information and I will talk to my vet about additional calcium and possibly magnesium, at least for the calf. She does have access to mineral 24/7 specifically for my geographic area, including (this time of year) CTC.
 

MurraysMutts

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Well, I let them join the herd and he's a little maniac, playing with the other calves until he's exhausted. Maybe wishful thinking, but mama seems to look better already.

I don't think he has an underbite, but will watch his progress and check them both out thoroughly in a couple weeks when we work the entire herd.

Thank you for the information and I will talk to my vet about additional calcium and possibly magnesium, at least for the calf. She does have access to mineral 24/7 specifically for my geographic area, including (this time of year) CTC.
Nice to hear an update. So glad they are getting on good!
He looked like a rambunctious lil dude just looking for a place to make trouble!
😂
 

gcreekrch

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Well, I let them join the herd and he's a little maniac, playing with the other calves until he's exhausted. Maybe wishful thinking, but mama seems to look better already.

I don't think he has an underbite, but will watch his progress and check them both out thoroughly in a couple weeks when we work the entire herd.

Thank you for the information and I will talk to my vet about additional calcium and possibly magnesium, at least for the calf. She does have access to mineral 24/7 specifically for my geographic area, including (this time of year) CTC.
Glad for you, mine died at day six. Never did suck on its own and got a respiratory on top of that. He who has, must lose.
 
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TCRanch

TCRanch

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BTW I saw my vet today. Just based on my pics (of which I have many), he thinks the calf may have somewhat of an underbite, but nothing he would worry about. If it makes me feel better, he'll get me some calcium gel (doesn't recommend IV for my calf), but one 'n done isn't going to do much in the long term.

He may surprise me, but I really don't expect him to grow that much anyway. Plus, I have a friend that's already called dibs on him when he's weaned - solely as yard art & entertainment for the kids.:)
 

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