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Skinny Momma

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Anonymous

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Hi Folks... I need some input. Have a 2 yr old Limi heifer that we had to pull her first calf 2 1/2 weeks ago. She was diagnosed with pneumonia a couple of weeks before the birth so she's had a rough month. Calf is fine, but Momma is starving herself. She's down at least 350# I'd guess from her pre-birth weight (90lbs of that was calf). She turns her nose up to show ration and creep, eats a little grass and drinks about 1/2 the water she should have in a day. She is going after the mineral block pretty heavily. Temp is 102 to 103. Usually give Penicillin (10cc) when temp passes 102.5. Also have given ProBios and some B vitamin. This is the girl we couldn't feed enough during show season now she's worse than my finicky eating kids!! We're feeding baby 1 gallon 2X a day just to help Momma. HELP!!! Anyone with any ideas as this has become a vigil???



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Anonymous

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This girl has had a rough start. If she is producing milk and still losing weight she may be ketotic. One symptom may be if her breath has a distinctive off odor. Drenching propylene glycol may help for the ketosis as well as give her a much needed boost of energy. Drenching her once a day for the next week would be helpful for her to overcome the ketotic condition. Check with your vet as an IV of dextrose also may help.

She may be ailing yet from the pneumonia or the fact that she had a double whammy from the respiratory problem and having her calf pulled. Have you or the vet palpated her uterus to see if she has sufficiently passed all of her placenta following the calf's birth? If not, she may have some metritis.

Another possibility since she is off feed and not consuming enough roughage is that she may have a displaced abomasum. Following birth there is a void from the calf being removed and with the girl being off feed and gas in the abomasum, this stomach may have shifted up to the left side.

All things considered, work with your vet ASAP before she gets too far over the hump and she cannot recover.



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Anonymous

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> This girl has had a rough start.
> If she is producing milk and still
> losing weight she may be ketotic.
> One symptom may be if her breath
> has a distinctive off odor.
> Drenching propylene glycol may
> help for the ketosis as well as
> give her a much needed boost of
> energy. Drenching her once a day
> for the next week would be helpful
> for her to overcome the ketotic
> condition. Check with your vet as
> an IV of dextrose also may help.

> She may be ailing yet from the
> pneumonia or the fact that she had
> a double whammy from the
> respiratory problem and having her
> calf pulled. Have you or the vet
> palpated her uterus to see if she
> has sufficiently passed all of her
> placenta following the calf's
> birth? If not, she may have some
> metritis.

> Another possibility since she is
> off feed and not consuming enough
> roughage is that she may have a
> displaced abomasum. Following
> birth there is a void from the
> calf being removed and with the
> girl being off feed and gas in the
> abomasum, this stomach may have
> shifted up to the left side.

> All things considered, work with
> your vet ASAP before she gets too
> far over the hump and she cannot
> recover.

Wow... thanks... what is scary, is I understood most of that! What is the quickest way to tell about the displaced abomasum? She's eating a bit more (I put mineral on top of it) and seemed to drink more than in the past. But she almost chews like it hurts...

Everyone here and on the other board that have posted replies have been great. THANKS



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Anonymous

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Even though she is nibbling on feed she is feeling rough and out of whack. Her stage of gestation is telling her to produce milk and she needs help to overcome her health problems.

If she is continuing a low grade fever it is most probably coming from either her bout of pneumonia, the uterus, or mastitis. Until you or your vet determine what the cause is she just does not sound if she is going to get better very fast.

If it is determined that she has a displaced abomasum this may continue until she is back on feed or has it tacked by the vet. Checking for a DA can be used with a simple stethoscope but takes practice. If unfamiliar with this it is recommended to work with your vet.



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