Sharpening a pocket knife

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JW IN VA

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For those if you who keep a sharp knife,what do you use? I know the old bench stone is the classic but I'm trying to hold consistent angles and haven't been able to do that.I have a Worksharp which does well but I'm concerned about taking out too much metal.Also have crock sticks which work well to hone a knife but aren't aggressive enough to reset angles or restore a dulled/chipped edge.
Maybe I'm overthinking this.Tend to do that but don't like spending money then finding out something else as better for the same or less.
 
I have several working knives. For everything from field dressing elk to skinning a muskrat. I use this:
nlrfiu.jpg


Then finish with ceramic diamond rods crossed in a block.
 
Bright Raven":21idtitl said:
I have several working knives. For everything from field dressing elk to skinning a muskrat. I use this:
nlrfiu.jpg


Then finish with ceramic diamond rods crossed in a block.

Been looking at those and the 3 stone set up as i have a set of crock sticks to finish on.Only about 6.00 difference,though.
 
JW IN VA":27m78smp said:
Bright Raven":27m78smp said:
I have several working knives. For everything from field dressing elk to skinning a muskrat. I use this:
nlrfiu.jpg


Then finish with ceramic diamond rods crossed in a block.

Been looking at those and the 3 stone set up as i have a set of crock sticks to finish on.Only about 6.00 difference,though.

The crock sticks really put a sweet edge on but the guide and rod with the stone gives you the right taper.
 
Bench grinder

In all seriousness, I have a wet stone then a superfine natural oilstone, not sure on the name of it, it's 80 years old and looks like new, works great for the final edge..

For a quick sharpen I have a harbor freight double sided flat diamond stone with a ceramic V block... works alright
 
JW IN VA":3ocg79pr said:
For those if you who keep a sharp knife,what do you use? I know the old bench stone is the classic but I'm trying to hold consistent angles and haven't been able to do that.I have a Worksharp which does well but I'm concerned about taking out too much metal.Also have crock sticks which work well to hone a knife but aren't aggressive enough to reset angles or restore a dulled/chipped edge.
Maybe I'm overthinking this.Tend to do that but don't like spending money then finding out something else as better for the same or less.

The old pocket "Arkansas" oil stone works great. Someone gave me one when I was a child. It had a wedge to show you the angle to hold the blade. I developed a feel for it. There is also a change in sound when you start getting the edge refined. A dull edge versus a sharp edge sound completely different.

Now that I have learned the sound and feel, I can use it on diamond blades, steel, ceramics, tungsten etc.

A lot of folks hand me knives and ask me to put edges on them.

I've never owned a Lansky system. Didn't think I needed anything else. But I know a lot of people who love them.

If you learn to use sound, you won't grind the blade away. A 40 year old blade, sharpened regularly, should lose an 1/8" or so in normal use. If you abuse it or hack with it, different story. If you're a daily meat cutter, different story.

Anything you sharpen has to deal with angle. Lots of people throw away drill bits. I sharpen them. I still have much to learn with drill bits but I'm using a side grinder versus a stone. Sound can't be heard over the machine.
 
Backhoeboogie, it definitely makes a big difference in how much and what you cut. The type of the steel and the composite of the steel makes a world of difference in how you sharpen a knife. Does anyone sharpen a pocket knife on their boot or britches anymore?
 
True Grit Farms":346iowc9 said:
Backhoeboogie, it definitely makes a big difference in how much and what you cut. The type of the steel and the composite of the steel makes a world of difference in how you sharpen a knife. Does anyone sharpen a pocket knife on their boot or britches anymore?
very true. I mostly use a cheap two sided stone. I can keep a case pocket knife shaving sharp. off course it helps to never let it get completely dull. I generally touch up my knife every evening and keep a stone in the truck. I have several custom knives your not going to get sharp without a diamond stone. the steel is two hard. once you get them sharp they stay sharp with a little maintance. sharping a knife is definatly becoming a lost art. I almost passed out when I saw that onion grit. didn't have you figured as someone who used something like that. that said I will probably order one. I know commercial fisherman keep sharp blades.
 
callmefence":2j1wyme9 said:
True Grit Farms":2j1wyme9 said:
Backhoeboogie, it definitely makes a big difference in how much and what you cut. The type of the steel and the composite of the steel makes a world of difference in how you sharpen a knife. Does anyone sharpen a pocket knife on their boot or britches anymore?
very true. I mostly use a cheap two sided stone. I can keep a case pocket knife shaving sharp. off course it helps to never let it get completely dull. I generally touch up my knife every evening and keep a stone in the truck. I have several custom knives your not going to get sharp without a diamond stone. the steel is two hard. once you get them sharp they stay sharp with a little maintance. sharping a knife is definatly becoming a lost art. I almost passed out when I saw that onion grit. didn't have you figured as someone who used something like that. that said I will probably order one. I know commercial fisherman keep sharp blades.

Whittling is another lost art. I remember an old man who'd eat a peach for lunch. He'd carve the peach seed into a monkey's head while it was moist. I still have a couple he gave me.
 
True Grit Farms":3pjq8qut said:
Backhoeboogie, it definitely makes a big difference in how much and what you cut. The type of the steel and the composite of the steel makes a world of difference in how you sharpen a knife. Does anyone sharpen a pocket knife on their boot or britches anymore?

I do on my boot.
 
I have a couple of oil stones that I got when I was a machine adjuster at Reynolds Metals in the early 70s. they are about 4 inches by two inches and if you are not careful you can cut the ends of your fingers off while sharpening a knife but that is what I use to sharpen all my knives...sharpened six a couple of nights ago
 
callmefence":2vcequqc said:
True Grit Farms":2vcequqc said:
Backhoeboogie, it definitely makes a big difference in how much and what you cut. The type of the steel and the composite of the steel makes a world of difference in how you sharpen a knife. Does anyone sharpen a pocket knife on their boot or britches anymore?
very true. I mostly use a cheap two sided stone. I can keep a case pocket knife shaving sharp. off course it helps to never let it get completely dull. I generally touch up my knife every evening and keep a stone in the truck. I have several custom knives your not going to get sharp without a diamond stone. the steel is two hard. once you get them sharp they stay sharp with a little maintance. sharping a knife is definatly becoming a lost art. I almost passed out when I saw that onion grit. didn't have you figured as someone who used something like that. that said I will probably order one. I know commercial fisherman keep sharp blades.

Fenceman, you'll be amazed once you get the tool figured out. You can only imagine the wet stones, oil stones and diamond stones we've been through. You also touched on the most important thing to sharpening a knife, is to not let it get dull.
 
Caustic Burno":2q4fethu said:
True Grit Farms":2q4fethu said:
Backhoeboogie, it definitely makes a big difference in how much and what you cut. The type of the steel and the composite of the steel makes a world of difference in how you sharpen a knife. Does anyone sharpen a pocket knife on their boot or britches anymore?

I do on my boot.

Your old school, I can remember sitting around the campfire as a kid and my uncle touching his pocket knife up on his boot. He'd always touch his thumb on the blade.
 

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