Select a Texas Longhorn!

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

Hey out there! At Running Arrow Farm we breed and raise Registered Longhorn Cattle. Now, for some information on Texas Longhorns:

They are some of the "original" cattle in the USA which roamed the vast open spaces in the 19th century. They nearly came to extinction in the early 1900's due to lack of breeder interest, and other factors.

Longhorns are very hardy, tolerate almost nearly every climate, are very efficient browsers, virtually immune to pinkeye, and according to university research, have an average 99.7% unassisted calving record! Cows tend to have a live and well calf every year and can calve into their late teens and even into their 20's. Of recent years, the trend has been to improve the confirmation to create larger bodied cattle with good "beefy" confirmation, but cows usually are kept within the 900 to 1200 lb. weight range; bulls can range from about 1,600 to 2,200 lbs.

Longhorns produce lean beef and the beef is lower in cholesterol than pork or most chicken...surprise!

Modern-day breeders breed selectively for quality confirmation, easy and mild dispositions, and a pallet of colors. Every Longhorn born is unique in color and no two are alike (as far as we know).

Longhorns are very intelligent, easily halter-trained, are very people-oriented and friendly without being aggressive (with very few exceptions).

There were originally 7 "families" of Longhorns; however, as the result of selective breeding and out-crossing, much of the original families are diffused in the herds. All of this has produced superior traits in our modern-day Longhorns.

Longhorn steers have the longest horns of all and are generally easily trained for saddle to ride in parades, and other events.

At Running Arrow Farm, our registered stock all know their individual names and you can call one particular animal in the pasture and he/she will look your way. They are easily managed and sorted (sometimes offering a food treat helps).

If you have other questions, please email me! Happy Looooonnnnnggggginggg! Bill

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

And they will dock you heavily at the salesbarn!

dunmovin farms

> Hey out there! At Running Arrow
> Farm we breed and raise Registered
> Longhorn Cattle. Now, for some
> information on Texas Longhorns:

> They are some of the
> "original" cattle in the
> USA which roamed the vast open
> spaces in the 19th century. They
> nearly came to extinction in the
> early 1900's due to lack of
> breeder interest, and other
> factors.

> Longhorns are very hardy, tolerate
> almost nearly every climate, are
> very efficient browsers, virtually
> immune to pinkeye, and according
> to university research, have an
> average 99.7% unassisted calving
> record! Cows tend to have a live
> and well calf every year and can
> calve into their late teens and
> even into their 20's. Of recent
> years, the trend has been to
> improve the confirmation to create
> larger bodied cattle with good
> "beefy" confirmation,
> but cows usually are kept within
> the 900 to 1200 lb. weight range;
> bulls can range from about 1,600
> to 2,200 lbs.

> Longhorns produce lean beef and
> the beef is lower in cholesterol
> than pork or most
> chicken...surprise!

> Modern-day breeders breed
> selectively for quality
> confirmation, easy and mild
> dispositions, and a pallet of
> colors. Every Longhorn born is
> unique in color and no two are
> alike (as far as we know).

> Longhorns are very intelligent,
> easily halter-trained, are very
> people-oriented and friendly
> without being aggressive (with
> very few exceptions).

> There were originally 7
> "families" of Longhorns;
> however, as the result of
> selective breeding and
> out-crossing, much of the original
> families are diffused in the
> herds. All of this has produced
> superior traits in our modern-day
> Longhorns.

> Longhorn steers have the longest
> horns of all and are generally
> easily trained for saddle to ride
> in parades, and other events.

> At Running Arrow Farm, our
> registered stock all know their
> individual names and you can call
> one particular animal in the
> pasture and he/she will look your
> way. They are easily managed and
> sorted (sometimes offering a food
> treat helps).

> If you have other questions,
> please email me! Happy
> Looooonnnnnggggginggg! Bill
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Very true! Ya got that right! That's why the vast majority of Longhorn breeders do not sell their cattle via sale barns. Most of our sales are via private treaty to individuals who want to upgrade their herds, introduce different bloodlines, etc. Some people purchase Longhorns for "pasture ornaments" as well as to have something different in their herd or to show off to their neighbors. I think the majority of Longhorn breeders who DO take a Longhorn to the sale barn take those who's confirmation or other characteristic is not appropriate to perpetuate to other serious breeders. The sale barns are very heavily into black, red, and beefy treaditional English and related cross-breeds. Longhorns are a specialty, if not nitch market with world-wide clientele.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

They sold a package of some 20 or so aged Longhorn cows at HLA last week. By the looks of them they had a long history and sure had long horns. They were a scary looking bunch of cows in the pen.... all juggling for position and expertly using their bruising head armour. In the ring they were very respectful of humans which surprised me....well ecept for one snortin single which sold at about 300 miles an hour, with snot flying everywhere. They were bred to a "large boned" Charlais and brought 300 dollars a piece. I don't know if they were purchased for slaughter or as cows.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Interesting! Yes, Longhorns will briefly juggle for position in the herd if new ones are introduced. The one "snortin'" cow was possibly one with some "wild" blood/personality in her. Don't know anything about temperament of Charolais and what effect it would have on x-breeding w/longhorns. Yes, $300 a head was probably a combination of "sale barn" prices, aged cows, and longhorn type. My guess is that they were destined for slaughter...especially if they weren't "high end" pedigrees, were old, and/or some kind of financial distress sale by consigner. The better Longhorns that are consigned for sales are usually taken to a special Longhorn sale/auction where the prices are much better and buyers are looking for Longhorns. As rule of thumb (for most of Longhorn people) is that non-registered (and/or problem Longhorns) are sold by the pound, and the registered "good" ones are sold by "each".

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Just my 2 cents! My wife went to the University of Texas so she is true Orange Long Horn. We have had cattle for a long time. I refuse to let a long horn enter the pasture. Mostly because of the horns. They are very pretty animals for pets or displays in the field. Not too practical to run through a shoot though. I've thought about getting her one but I'm sure it would cut up my cows with those horns (none of my cattle have horns).

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Long Live UT! Appreciate your honest comments. To address some of your concerns: There are Longhorns and there are Longhorns--like any livestock, they have a pecking order; however, I have never seen or heard of a Longhorn injuring or killing another livestock. Now, they will aggressively chase away coyotes, wolves, cats, non-cattle dogs and other "perdator" species. Cattle and horses, as I'm sure you well know, are "prey" animals.

We have mixed our Longhorns with our Tennessee Walking Horses and Peruvian Paso Horses with no unpleasant events occurring. Our Peruvian Paso brood mare did chase away a barely weaned Longhorn heifer once, though.

The Longhorns will challenge their own kind for pecking position when a new one is introduced into the pasture (as I am sure other breeds do too). However, the Longhorns know EXACTLY where the tip of their horns are and can scratch an itch smaller than your fingertip--watching them vie for position (or mating dance between Bull and Cow) they "play" with each other with the horns; but, primarily it is head-pushing--never touching the tip of a horn in a vital spot or drawing any blood. If you will pardon my next comment...lol I would much rather have a Longhorn or two in the yard than an undisclipined child waving a stick around or playing with a bow and arrow.

Yes, they do make nice pasture ornaments and there is a significant market there. Some companies will have some in their front area to attract the attention of passersby to make sure they see their business sign!

True again--Longhorns do NOT work well in traditional cattle chutes and headgates, once their horns pass about 6" or so from the tip of their ears. We use what they call the "Medina Hinge" concept which is a couple of 10' gates hinged about 6" apart which swing together following a 1/4" thick curved steel plate at the opening/closing end. Works like a miracle. Note: a Longhorn with a 48" or so tip to tip spread can pass thru an alley 20-24" wide with little effort...they manoeuver their horns very well.

Finally, thanks again for responding and your nice comments!

Bill

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

rarely in my area of north louisiana will a longhorn at the sale barn bring over $300. in this area one selling for that much went home with somebody because she was young and bred.. and most then dont bring $300.

they are light weight generally and dont bring enough per # to bring $300 for those sold for slaughter.

just my observation

gene

> They sold a package of some 20 or
> so aged Longhorn cows at HLA last
> week. By the looks of them they
> had a long history and sure had
> long horns. They were a scary
> looking bunch of cows in the
> pen.... all juggling for position
> and expertly using their bruising
> head armour. In the ring they were
> very respectful of humans which
> surprised me....well ecept for one
> snortin single which sold at about
> 300 miles an hour, with snot
> flying everywhere. They were bred
> to a "large boned"
> Charlais and brought 300 dollars a
> piece. I don't know if they were
> purchased for slaughter or as
> cows.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

that is very interesting to me.. i have had a donkey in the past to deal with dogs, etc, but she didnt work out well, wanted to steal the baby calves from the momma cow. i will look into this and may get one just for that reason.

thanks for that info. also i can see where the 2 10' gates would work very well in catching their heads..

thanks again

gene

> Long Live UT! Appreciate your
> honest comments. To address some
> of your concerns: There are
> Longhorns and there are
> Longhorns--like any livestock,
> they have a pecking order;
> however, I have never seen or
> heard of a Longhorn injuring or
> killing another livestock. Now,
> they will aggressively chase away
> coyotes, wolves, cats, non-cattle
> dogs and other
> "perdator" species.
> Cattle and horses, as I'm sure you
> well know, are "prey"
> animals.

> We have mixed our Longhorns with
> our Tennessee Walking Horses and
> Peruvian Paso Horses with no
> unpleasant events occurring. Our
> Peruvian Paso brood mare did chase
> away a barely weaned Longhorn
> heifer once, though.

> The Longhorns will challenge their
> own kind for pecking position when
> a new one is introduced into the
> pasture (as I am sure other breeds
> do too). However, the Longhorns
> know EXACTLY where the tip of
> their horns are and can scratch an
> itch smaller than your
> fingertip--watching them vie for
> position (or mating dance between
> Bull and Cow) they
> "play" with each other
> with the horns; but, primarily it
> is head-pushing--never touching
> the tip of a horn in a vital spot
> or drawing any blood. If you will
> pardon my next comment...lol I
> would much rather have a Longhorn
> or two in the yard than an
> undisclipined child waving a stick
> around or playing with a bow and
> arrow.

> Yes, they do make nice pasture
> ornaments and there is a
> significant market there. Some
> companies will have some in their
> front area to attract the
> attention of passersby to make
> sure they see their business sign!

> True again--Longhorns do NOT work
> well in traditional cattle chutes
> and headgates, once their horns
> pass about 6" or so from the
> tip of their ears. We use what
> they call the "Medina
> Hinge" concept which is a
> couple of 10' gates hinged about
> 6" apart which swing together
> following a 1/4" thick curved
> steel plate at the opening/closing
> end. Works like a miracle. Note: a
> Longhorn with a 48" or so tip
> to tip spread can pass thru an
> alley 20-24" wide with little
> effort...they manoeuver their
> horns very well.

> Finally, thanks again for
> responding and your nice comments!

> Bill

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

On chutes & gates: For example, Powder River manufactures a rather expensive Longhorn chute/gate unit that supposedly well. The Medina Hinge concept of ours was constructed on site at a fraction of the cost. There are some other commercial manufacturers who use the Medina concept in their Longhorn devices.

Longhorn temperament goes back to genetics, genetics, genetics, and the way they are handled and bonded with. Our Longhorns are all registered and from select bloodlines; calves are eligible for registration. All of ours will eat out of your hand (some are little more shy than others)...they all know their names and when you call one (even if they are 600-800 feet away) they will come to you--we use lot of positive reinforcement. The only "precaution" is that when you are feeding on foot in the pasture, do not hesitate to give them their hay or treat...like any large animal...they want their goodies, NOW! LOL.

Our three most gentle Longhorns are two young heifers in halter training and our 19 month old Red Roan Bull who has 42" of horn. He loves to have his head scratched, neck rubbed, and all and if he is eating his cubes you can pet him just about anywhere and he seems to enjoy it.

Bill

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> Hey out there! At Running Arrow
> Farm we breed and raise Registered
> Longhorn Cattle. Now, for some
> information on Texas Longhorns:

> They are some of the
> "original" cattle in the
> USA which roamed the vast open
> spaces in the 19th century. They
> nearly came to extinction in the
> early 1900's due to lack of
> breeder interest, and other
> factors.

> Longhorns are very hardy, tolerate
> almost nearly every climate, are
> very efficient browsers, virtually
> immune to pinkeye, and according
> to university research, have an
> average 99.7% unassisted calving
> record! Cows tend to have a live
> and well calf every year and can
> calve into their late teens and
> even into their 20's. Of recent
> years, the trend has been to
> improve the confirmation to create
> larger bodied cattle with good
> "beefy" confirmation,
> but cows usually are kept within
> the 900 to 1200 lb. weight range;
> bulls can range from about 1,600
> to 2,200 lbs.

> Longhorns produce lean beef and
> the beef is lower in cholesterol
> than pork or most
> chicken...surprise!

> Modern-day breeders breed
> selectively for quality
> confirmation, easy and mild
> dispositions, and a pallet of
> colors. Every Longhorn born is
> unique in color and no two are
> alike (as far as we know).

> Longhorns are very intelligent,
> easily halter-trained, are very
> people-oriented and friendly
> without being aggressive (with
> very few exceptions).

> There were originally 7
> "families" of Longhorns;
> however, as the result of
> selective breeding and
> out-crossing, much of the original
> families are diffused in the
> herds. All of this has produced
> superior traits in our modern-day
> Longhorns.

> Longhorn steers have the longest
> horns of all and are generally
> easily trained for saddle to ride
> in parades, and other events.

> At Running Arrow Farm, our
> registered stock all know their
> individual names and you can call
> one particular animal in the
> pasture and he/she will look your
> way. They are easily managed and
> sorted (sometimes offering a food
> treat helps).

> If you have other questions,
> please email me! Happy
> Looooonnnnnggggginggg! Bill

Hello Bill,

Your information is very interesting! Thank you for sharing that.

I'm working on a project and I desperately need your expert help if possible.

You mentioned in your message that there were originally 7 "families" of Longhorns. I understand that there are 7 different shapes of horns which are: Texas Twist, Halo, Pitchfork, Basket, Corkscrew, Seagull and Lyre.

Can you direct me to any source of information that shows which ranch, person, etc., bred cattle which produced the 7 different horn shapes?

A friend gave me the following list of people who were supposed to have bred cattle which had the 7 different horn shapes. Can you please see if you can match up which person bred the 7 different horn types?

Emile Marks, Graves Peeler, M.P. Wright Jr., Milby Butler, Capt Yates, J.G. Phillips, John Hatton, and Will C. Barns.

I realize there are 8 names listed, but maybe two of the folks bred the same type of cattle that produced the same shape of horns.

Thank you so very much for what ever help you can provide.



[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> You mentioned in your message that
> there were originally 7
> "families" of Longhorns.
> I understand that there are 7
> different shapes of horns which
> are: Texas Twist, Halo, Pitchfork,
> Basket, Corkscrew, Seagull and
> Lyre.

> Can you direct me to any source of
> information that shows which
> ranch, person, etc., bred cattle
> which produced the 7 different
> horn shapes?

> A friend gave me the following
> list of people who were supposed
> to have bred cattle which had the
> 7 different horn shapes. Can you
> please see if you can match up
> which person bred the 7 different
> horn types?

> Emile Marks, Graves Peeler, M.P.
> Wright Jr., Milby Butler, Capt
> Yates, J.G. Phillips, John Hatton,
> and Will C. Barns.

> I realize there are 8 names
> listed, but maybe two of the folks
> bred the same type of cattle that
> produced the same shape of horns.

> Thank you so very much for what
> ever help you can provide.

You have six of the 7 "families" -- the final one being WR (for Wichita Mountain Wildlide Refuge). Barns was one of the men that scoured the countryside looking for the animals that became part of the WR herd, back in the 1920's I think. Don't know about Hatton.

Try contacting the TLBA or the ITLBA for information regarding horn type associated with the specific families. I don't think there is near the correlation for the 7 "families" to the the 7 horn types you listed as you might believe.

From what little I know on the subject I think most people that breed for massive horn size do so with Butler line animals, whereas some of the other families are noted for specific body characteristics.

For good information on Longhorns as well as other ranching articles a fine site to visit is <A HREF="http://www.asocl.com" TARGET="_blank">www.asocl.com</A> (that's the website for a Longhorn breeder known as a A Splash of Color). On their main page click onto the item entitled Information Section. You may find the following topics particularly interesting: Horn Styles and History of the Longhorn
 
Top