Seeding ryegrass this fall

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callmefence

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I spot spray thistle. That is it. Mowing at the right time and getting soil right got rid of them for me. Fescue overtook the weeds and displaced them
That can work but spending 10.00 -15.00 bucks on herbicide works faster and better and as birddog said. You won't be feeding the weeds.
 

HDRider

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That can work but spending 10.00 -15.00 bucks on herbicide works faster and better and as birddog said. You won't be feeding the weeds.
I have a seed bank that just will not quit.

Different roads for different people. Like I said, the weeds disappeared. That is all that matters.
 

shaz

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I don't usually mess with annuals but my hunter tilled up an acre for a game plot this year and I decided it would be a good time to experiment a.k.a play.

We put out cereal rye, fescue, white clover, crimson clover, oats, purple top turnips and some radish.
Looks like the rye and turnips came up first.
 

ClinchValley86

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I've read of people not being able to pre purchase their fertilize due to the uncertainty of the pricing for 2022. I thought 2021 prices were unreal. Will not be spreading any if it goes up much more. Will buy hay instead.
 

kenny thomas

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I've read of people not being able to pre purchase their fertilize due to the uncertainty of the pricing for 2022. I thought 2021 prices were unreal. Will not be spreading any if it goes up much more. Will buy hay instead.
Your local TN Co-op has told me just that. Also that 19-19-19 could be over $900 a ton. I won't need to contract anything at that price.
 

J+ Cattle

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With input costs going up faster than the price we receive for our products it makes a low margin turn negative. Look for alternative methods for what you normally do or just reduce you expected production accordingly. Previous posts mention clover varieties and vetch which are nitrogen fixing plants, I will mention another one, Austrian winter peas. Consider growing your own fertilizer!
 

kenny thomas

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With input costs going up faster than the price we receive for our products it makes a low margin turn negative. Look for alternative methods for what you normally do or just reduce you expected production accordingly. Previous posts mention clover varieties and vetch which are nitrogen fixing plants, I will mention another one, Austrian winter peas. Consider growing your own fertilizer!
I was interested until I read that they recommend 200# per acre of 19-19-19 be added.
 

bird dog

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Yeah it doesn't make much sense. Vetch, peas and some clovers are annuals. Takes fertilizer to get them started and growing well. Will they produce any by themselves before summer kills them off?
Clovers always sound good on paper, but the seeds are tiny, expensive, hard to plant and don't do real well in black soil. Some of the medics may be a better option in black soil or so I have been told. I have never had any luck getting any of them to come up besides crimson.
 

1982vett

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Arrow leaf and Ball clover does well in my black land soil. Took a decade for me to really get it established because of drought conditions but when I got the seedbank built it’s doing great. I’ve seen evidence that it does help with nitrogen fixation. Just how much is the question but a forage test on hay came back well above expectations last year and 2% better than comparable forage without clover. Problem is weeds. I can’t spray till end of may if I want it to reseed well. By then it takes 2 to 3 times the chemical to control some of the weeds.

No one wants to hear it or do it….but reducing stocking rates makes you less dependent on fertilizer….we’ve all been brainwashed into fertilizing at any cost. Just sayin.
 

callmefence

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46-0-0 is $800 a ton here. There is none being put out in my immediate future.
Yeah it doesn't make much sense. Vetch, peas and some clovers are annuals. Takes fertilizer to get them started and growing well. Will they produce any by themselves before summer kills them off?
Clovers always sound good on paper, but the seeds are tiny, expensive, hard to plant and don't do real well in black soil. Some of the medics may be a better option in black soil or so I have been told. I have never had any luck getting any of them to come up besides crimson.
Bought 3 ton of 46-0-0 to put on my ryegrass and oats last week. That's about what I got billed. Kinda wish i would have ask the price. 😂

Crimson clover has worked out ok for me and does volunteer back ok. Problem with it is it seems to draw every deer in the county .
 

ClinchValley86

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Your local TN Co-op has told me just that. Also that 19-19-19 could be over $900 a ton. I won't need to contract anything at that price.
I am very glad I've been moving in an input-less direction the last couple years. I expect this coming year will be the last for our hay ground lease. Which is fine. Shuttling hay and equipment back and forth is really wearing me thin. I'm not complaining though, because it has gotten me to here.

Feeding hay back on ground from which it was taken will go a long ways in combating fertilizer needs. At least in theory it does.

I've been feeding heavily on this farm's hayfields, and grazing them through the growing season. It looks fertilized right now.

We have culled cows heavily. Got rid of about 75 percent of them. Kept the calves.

I think now is the time for me/us to shift away from cow-calf. Hay yields were short, inputs are through the roof, and the market is beyond repair IMO. A direct marketing cooperative for the area would be awesome.
 

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