Santa Gertrudis x Braford.

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Last night this dude came to roping practice, and introduced hinself as the manager of a Santa Gertrudis operation , that I know has been running at least 55 years. Whoever has it now, is the 4th owner since 1968. Anyhow, he told me they have been breeding half the herd to a registered Braford bull. And they bought 10 registered Braford cows, and 4 red & white f1 Br x Herf ( they don't want any tiger striped, chocolate or black ones), and breeding them to theor registered Gert bulls. Hereford x Gert has been a popular cross here the past couple of years. I asked him why they just didn't get BeefMasters, as they are basically the same thing they were creating. He told me there were too many variables in Beef Master. No consistency in type or size, or color. They may have near as much ear and leather as a full Brahma, to almost no ear and leather, and about every color cattle come in.

I went over there today, and this cross looks like a red WF Gert, or maybe a solid red Braford with just a white face. He said they get a lot of calls on their heifers from people looking for the Herf X Gert heifers. They have a client that buys these heifers and breeds them to Angus 1st time, then homo polled and black Simms for the 2nd and subsequent calves...terminal crosses.... and they are having black polled calves , that some have a white patch on their foreheads, but most are solid. He called the man and I am riding up there with him Wednesday to check those out.

He said their steers sold as well as the pb Gerts do, and since they don't register their Gert heifers any more...just bull calves that might make a good herd bull.... these cross bred heifers sell as well, if not better than the pb Gert heifers do. I asked if he saw any difference in the Gert x Braf vs the Braf x Gert. He said on average, the Gert x Herf calves weaned a little heavier than the Braf x Gerts did, but kind of depended on the individual cow.
 
do they look as fleshy and easy to keep..like the straight Hereford cross? Some of those can be slower maturing ..
 
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Sounds like they have developed a market and are producing a good product .
A Beef Master is supposed to be 1/2 Brahma, 1/4 herford and 1/4 shorthorn. These will be close. The Gert X Braford will be 3/8ths Brahma, 5/16ths Hereford and 5/16ths Shorthorn. The Gert x f1 BR-Herf will be 1/4 Herf, 5/16ths Shorthorn, and 7/16ths Brahma. So he was right, they are nearly the same as BM, probably the exact same as some BM's. They just appeared to have more uniformity and consistency between individuals.
 
Last night this dude came to roping practice, and introduced hinself as the manager of a Santa Gertrudis operation , that I know has been running at least 55 years. Whoever has it now, is the 4th owner since 1968. Anyhow, he told me they have been breeding half the herd to a registered Braford bull. And they bought 10 registered Braford cows, and 4 red & white f1 Br x Herf ( they don't want any tiger striped, chocolate or black ones), and breeding them to theor registered Gert bulls. Hereford x Gert has been a popular cross here the past couple of years. I asked him why they just didn't get BeefMasters, as they are basically the same thing they were creating. He told me there were too many variables in Beef Master. No consistency in type or size, or color. They may have near as much ear and leather as a full Brahma, to almost no ear and leather, and about every color cattle come in.

I went over there today, and this cross looks like a red WF Gert, or maybe a solid red Braford with just a white face. He said they get a lot of calls on their heifers from people looking for the Herf X Gert heifers. They have a client that buys these heifers and breeds them to Angus 1st time, then homo polled and black Simms for the 2nd and subsequent calves...terminal crosses.... and they are having black polled calves , that some have a white patch on their foreheads, but most are solid. He called the man and I am riding up there with him Wednesday to check those out.

He said their steers sold as well as the pb Gerts do, and since they don't register their Gert heifers any more...just bull calves that might make a good herd bull.... these cross bred heifers sell as well, if not better than the pb Gert heifers do. I asked if he saw any difference in the Gert x Braf vs the Braf x Gert. He said on average, the Gert x Herf calves weaned a little heavier than the Braf x Gerts did, but kind of depended on the individual cow.
Down in Arkansas I worked for an outfit that supplied eggs, meat type chicks, and breeding poultry all over the world. They had several jets and their own airport. They invested in cattle to feed out under contract and owned about 18K head at any one time. And they also had the best Gerts I've ever seen. Selling a bull in the 100K range wasn't unusual.

One year they did a bunch of crossbreeding to see how their Gerts would perform in commercial herds and I bought several of the crossbred heifers. They really knew what they were doing when they managed their Gerts... and they brought that with them in choosing the animals they crossed their bulls to. And the heifers I got were exceptional. I got into Limousin later through another great outfit, and had great results with the Lims, but I can't say I liked them any better than the Gert crosses.
 
Down in Arkansas I worked for an outfit that supplied eggs, meat type chicks, and breeding poultry all over the world. They had several jets and their own airport. They invested in cattle to feed out under contract and owned about 18K head at any one time. And they also had the best Gerts I've ever seen. Selling a bull in the 100K range wasn't unusual.

One year they did a bunch of crossbreeding to see how their Gerts would perform in commercial herds and I bought several of the crossbred heifers. They really knew what they were doing when they managed their Gerts... and they brought that with them in choosing the animals they crossed their bulls to. And the heifers I got were exceptional. I got into Limousin later through another great outfit but I can't say I liked them any better than the Gert crosses.
What were the heifers that you bought crossed with?
 
Adams ranch have similar cattle.
 
Adams ranch have similar cattle.
It said they developed those 3 composites using their Brafords, but never said what the other cattle in the composites were.
 
As a fellow salesman I would have thought you would recognize a salesman blowing smoke up your butt? 😄

Aside from the fact of Beefmaster having a long, successful, breeding program... saying that you can cross two composites and get more consistency than one composite is not even logical. That's probably the reason for most people using Hereford and not Braford. The Hereford will bring some uniformity to the gerts.

That cross is no more capable or less capable, from a breed stand point, than any other cross. They are good cattle with a lot of eye appeal. Red motts with ear with always sell.

Any time I hear some one put that much emphasis on breed its a red flag that you are getting a sales pitch.
 
do they look as fleshy and easy to keep..like the straight Hereford cross? Some of those can be slower maturing ..
I haven't seen a mature cow yet, but we going tomorrow to see some he sold. The calves he had yesterday are 5 mos old or so. Not much difference in size as far as them vs the straight Gerts. I would assume the maturity rate of those cross heifers would be about the same as in Gerts or Brafords. The ones we are going to see were bred at 18-20 months old, but I dunno if it was waiting on them to nature a little more, or if the guy just wanted them to calve at a certain time. Will know more after tomorrow. There was no distinguishable difference in the appearance of the fI cows' calves and the Brafords' calves. They have a tad more ear and leather than the traditional Gert x Herf. About like the difference in a Brangus and an UltraBlack.
 
Uncle used to run 250 head of gerts , I still have anger issues over dealing with that breed in my youth.
One head fly up the other 249 were to follow and be white eyed!
The only thing that stopped them from being carnivorous was no top teeth.
I remember when they first showed up here. They got here before Brangus and Braford did. Yes,, people called them wild and crazy, like they did the Brahmas, And it seems like they were more flighty than the Ang and Herf everyone had. Now days, for the most part, they seem as docile as any other. MIght be that over the last 50 years breeders selected for temperment, or people have learned how to handle them better , or a little of both.
 
I remember when they first showed up here. They got here before Brangus and Braford did. Yes,, people called them wild and crazy, like they did the Brahmas, And it seems like they were more flighty than the Ang and Herf everyone had. Now days, for the most part, they seem as docile as any other. MIght be that over the last 50 years breeders selected for temperment, or people have learned how to handle them better , or a little of both.
People have said the same thing about every other breed. The bad actors are the ones we notice instead of the other 50 that you could milk in an open field. (Well that's a stretch, but still) That place I bought my crossbred Gert heifers from had a young bull that was expected to bring big money... but they sent him to slaughter due to his attitude. And their concern over docility showed in those heifers.

Personally, I've never owned an Angus cow that I felt wasn't quick to get flighty or pissed off.
 
You have to think about where they came from. They are big country cattle. When you start trying to split them up and run them on small country it doesn't always go well. There are stories of people buying them off the KR and trying to turn them straight out in the pasture and they never saw them again. 😄

That's like my Victorian Bull. When you have generations of cattle raised on the coast and swimming the ICW they are going to be tough and have a certain amount of attitude. If they didn't, they would be dead.
 
People have said the same thing about every other breed. The bad actors are the ones we notice instead of the other 50 that you could milk in an open field. (Well that's a stretch, but still) That place I bought my crossbred Gert heifers from had a young bull that was expected to bring big money... but they sent him to slaughter due to his attitude. And their concern over docility showed in those heifers.

Personally, I've never owned an Angus cow that I felt wasn't quick to get flighty or pissed off.
I haven't ever had a mean Angus, except every one when they calve, for a week or so!!!
 
I have been on record on this site for years that for my area in North Alabama the Gert/Hereford cross is the best cross for a mother cow you can come across. Before the developers started buying us out had pasture just for making replacements that we put Angus or Brangus bulls on.
 

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I have been on record on this site for years that for my area in North Alabama the Gert/Hereford cross is the best cross for a mother cow you can come across. Before the developers started buying us out had pasture just for making replacements that we put Angus or Brangus bulls on.
This is exactly what the Gert and Braford crosses look like, but with about the same ear and leather as Gerts and Brafords have. If I had some of them, I would use Black Angus or Black Simm on them. If I had some of the Herf/Gert crosses like yours, I would use a Brangus.
 
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