• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Salt

Is Salt Good For Humans?

  • Yes

    Votes: 13 92.9%
  • No

    Votes: 3 21.4%

  • Total voters
    14

rockridgecattle

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 6, 2007
Messages
2,826
Reaction score
0
Location
Manitoba, Canada
You are just full of thought pervoking, mind bending, crap disturbing questions. How do you come up with all these questions? How do you know what buttons to push to envoke a response?

Is salt good for you...IN MODERATION...as with all things in life
 

TexasBred

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
30,439
Reaction score
9
Location
Heart of Texas
In proper amounts salt is essential for life just like oxygen and water. Excessive use of salt may have consequences.
 

HerefordSire

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
5,212
Reaction score
0
Location
Arkansas
This is another good example of how the general public forms an opinion over a product.


Controversy Continues

For many years, the intense public controversy that has characterized the public policy debate over public health nutrition recommendations on salt intake has focused on the wrong question. Medical experts, public health policy-makers – and the public, trying to sort out the issues reading the consumer press – have all focused on the relationship of sodium intake to blood pressure instead of the relevant question of whether changing intake levels of dietary sodium results in improved health outcomes. See, for example, recent Salt Institute comments to the (British) Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition.

There is no evidence that reducing dietary sodium improves the risk for heart attacks or strokes for the general population. In 1999, the Canadian Hypertension Society, the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, the Health Canada Laboratory Centre for Disease Control and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada issued a joint statement opposing general recommendations for sodium reduction.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has also reviewed the evidence and concluded:
"There is insufficient evidence that, for the general population, reducing dietary sodium intake or increasing dietary intake of iron, beta-carotene, or other antioxidants results in improved health outcomes."

The debate has confused the public. Medical journalists from ABC-TV’s 20/20 to America’s pre-eminent scientific journal, Science, published by the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science, have investigated the source of this confusion. The report in Science won author Gary Taubes a top prize from the National Association of Science Writers and has also been translated into French.

Taubes concluded:
“After interviews with some 80 researchers, clinicians, and administrators around the world, it is safe to say that if ever there were a controversy over the interpretation of scientific data, this is it….After decades of intensive research, the apparent benefits of avoiding salt have only diminished. This suggests either that the true benefit has now been revealed and is indeed small or that it is non-existent and researchers believing they have detected such benefits have been deluded by the confounding of other variables.”

The Salt Institute is confident that the higher standards of evidence-based medicine will reduce the ongoing controversy, better inform public policy and reduce consumer confusion. For more information about the importance of evidence-based health, you may wish to visit the Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford University (UK) Centre for Evidence-based Medicine, the Health Information Research Unit (McMaster University) or the Canadian Centres for Health Evidence. Using the latest science, we can create better public health nutrition policy.

http://www.saltworks.us/salt_info/si_Sa ... Health.asp
 

HerefordSire

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
5,212
Reaction score
0
Location
Arkansas
The CDC shown below, says we consume too much salt but I can find hundreds of documents saying the opposite so who do we believe?

Seven out of 10 U.S. adults get 2.3 times the healthy amount of salt. It's putting us in a world of hurt, says Darwin Labarthe, MD, PhD, director of the CDC's division for heart disease and stroke prevention.

"This is a very important message," Labarthe tells WebMD. "There is no room for debate any longer that a high level of salt causes stroke and heart disease, and that lowering salt intake will diminish these very serious health consequences."

When you eat salt, your blood pressure goes up. And high blood pressure dramatically increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. Recent studies definitively show that people who eat too much salt significantly increase their risk of stroke and heart disease.

http://www.webmd.com/heart/news/2009032 ... =rss_nafwa
 

mnmtranching

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
5,061
Reaction score
0
Location
MN
A mnmt study. :cowboy: There's a large part of the inner North American continent that does not have salt available. OK, I'm talking before RR and semis. :roll: Native Americans did quite well without salt and LOTS of other stuff.
 

mnmtranching

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
5,061
Reaction score
0
Location
MN
Just another mnmt study :nod: for those that are chomping at the bit for more. ;-) Iodine added to our salt is what is imperative to our health. So they say :roll: It's added to our salt, whether we want it or not, like fluoride toothpaste and vit D in milk etc. Anyway! don't question those that are taking care of us. :mad:
 

RD-Sam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
1,452
Reaction score
0
Yes! It makes my food taste good, and that makes me happy! :D
 

2/B or not 2/B

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
516
Reaction score
0
Location
California / Sierra Nevada Foothills
Isn't it a necessary component of our blood? For people who lived before salt and pepper shakers, I think they got it from eating plants and animals and also from trading with other people who lived near the ocean, salt flats, etc. Take oxygen. Gotta have it to live, crave it if you don't get enough, die if you get too much... an the same with some other elements right? Copper, magnesium, etc. Look at our cattle. We don't just give them salt and minerals for their enjoyment do we?
 

TexasBred

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
30,439
Reaction score
9
Location
Heart of Texas
2/B or not 2/B":3atmpvlo said:
Isn't it a necessary component of our blood? For people who lived before salt and pepper shakers, I think they got it from eating plants and animals and also from trading with other people who lived near the ocean, salt flats, etc. Take oxygen. Gotta have it to live, crave it if you don't get enough, die if you get too much... an the same with some other elements right? Copper, magnesium, etc. Look at our cattle. We don't just give them salt and minerals for their enjoyment do we?

In ancient times an ounce of salt was worth more than an ounce of gold. Yes a certain amount of salt (sodium chloride) is necessary. Doubtful an overdose would ever kill you but could cause other complications which could lead to death.

Throw a pair of fish into the Dead Sea and watch them multiply. :lol2:
 

Latest posts

Top