??s for Canada: Importing cattle to Canada from USA ...

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Kathie in Thorp

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There's a person in western Canada looking for a nice British White bull, and I happen to know of a very nice young one about 50 miles from me. Looked at him today, and he looks even better in person than his pics (yes, 3-Way, I think he's about as nice as the one I sent to Oregon). Those of you in Canada, what are the testing rules and other hassles involved in shipping a March 2014 virgin bull from USA to Canada? Someone mentioned to me maybe TB testing of the entire herd, for starters ... ?? As usual, thanks for your info.
 

Aaron

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General Requirements
1. All breeding cattle require an Import Permit issued by a CFIA office prior to the arrival of the animal at a port of entry. (Section 12.(1)(a) Health of Animals Regulations)

2. Breeding cattle imported into Canada must be born after January 1, 1999, and the animals must be identified with permanent identification that is recognized by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and are not under restriction for movement, slaughter or destruction control.

3. Breeding cattle are required to be identified with an official USDA metal eartag or a National Animal Identification System (NAIS) compliant "840" radio frequency "RF" eartag. For either method of identification, a tattoo must be in the right ear and show the letters "USA" at a minimum of 1 cm in height, or in the case of a female animal, it may be the official United States calfhood vaccination tattoo that includes the US registered shield and "V". Animals for temporary entry of a period of 90 days or less bearing an NAIS compliant "840" RF eartag are not required to have a tattoo.

4. Breeding cattle imported into Canada must have a tag applied before import or as soon as they arrive at initial destination under the national livestock identification program in accordance with section 189 of the Health of Animals Regulations unless they have been identified with a NAIS compliant "840" radio frequency "RF" eartag. The importer must report the tag information to the administrator of the program as required and within the time period specified, and as well, to the CFIA location where the importation of the animal occurred, if the tag is not already present in the animal at the time of import.

5. Breeding cattle may only be imported into Canada from the United States if the animal is transported directly to the Canada-United States border from the place of origin in the United States where the animals were tested in accordance with this document. Breeding cattle may be transported directly to the Canada-United States border from a consignment sale or a show in the United States if the animal was tested in accordance with the import conditions on the farm of origin and the animal was transported directly to the consignment sale or show from the place where it was tested. All breeding cattle and other ruminants at the consignment sale or show must have the equivalent herd status as the animals to be imported into Canada.

6. An animal that was born after its mother was tested is not required to meet the test requirements of this document if the animal is imported into Canada at the same time as its mother. An animal that was born after its mother was tested, unless it was born en route to Canada, must be identified with permanent identification and recorded on the health certificate of its mother.

7. Breeding cattle must be accompanied by a certificate of an official veterinarian of the United States or a certificate of a veterinarian licensed in the United States and endorsed by an official veterinarian of the United States. The certificate must contain the name and address of the consignor, the location where the animal is exported from and the name and address of the consignee. The certificate must also clearly identify the animal and show that the animal was inspected by a veterinarian within 30 days preceding the date of importation, that the animal was found to be free from any communicable disease and that the animal was to the best of the knowledge and belief of the veterinarian, not exposed to any communicable disease within 60 days preceding the date of the inspection.

Test Requirements for the Import of Breeding Cattle
A. Brucellosis Requirements

1. The brucellosis test for the import of breeding cattle to Canada is the standard tube test (STT) or standard plate test (SPT) with negative reading at a 1:50 dilution. The brucellosis test and result must be shown on the required health certificate for the animal to be imported:

Breeding cattle for import to Canada must not have been vaccinated for brucellosis under the Whole Herd Vaccination Program of the USDA, nor in the case of a bull, vaccinated for brucellosis.
RB51 vaccine has been used exclusively for more than 24 months in the United States for brucellosis control. The vaccine is not recognized in Canada and all animals require test for brucellosis where indicated except for steers and spayed heifers.
2. Herd of Origin Certification:

In this section the following definitions apply:

"assembled herd" means a herd that has been maintained as a herd for less than two years.
"established herd" means a herd that has been maintained as a herd for at least two years.
Breeding cattle may only be imported into Canada from the United States if the certificate presented at the time of import identifies one of the following conditions has been met for brucellosis:

The animal originates from a brucellosis-free herd, certified as such by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) irrespective of the Brucellosis status assigned to the state by the USDA and that the animal proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 30 days preceding the date of importation.

or

The animal originates in a state designated by the USDA as a Free State and the herd of origin is an established herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically during the 24 months preceding the date of importation, and that the animal proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 30 days preceding the date of import. Or, the herd of origin is an assembled herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically since the herd was assembled, and the animal for import proved negative to two serum agglutination tests for brucellosis performed at least 30 days apart with the second test occurring within 30 days of import to Canada.

or

The animal originated in a state designated by the USDA as a Class A or B State and the herd of origin of the animal is an established herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically during the previous 24 months and to which no additions were made other than natural increases, or if additions were made to the herd, the animals were subject to a negative serum agglutination test for brucellosis. The animal for import must have proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 30 days preceding the date of importation and the date of test is at least 60 days after the addition of the last animal to the herd which is not a natural increase. Or, the herd of origin of the animal for import to Canada is an assembled herd in which every animal in the herd, other than bovines less than six months of age, spayed heifers and steers proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 12 months preceding the date of importation. At the time of the test the animal for import was present and identified in the herd of origin or was a natural increase born after the test. The animal for import must have proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 30 days preceding the date of importation and the date of test must be at least 60 days after the assembled herd test.
B. Tuberculosis Requirements

1. The tuberculin test is the standard caudal fold injection with a reading of results at 72 hours as "No Reaction" and conducted within 60 days of import. The results of the tuberculin test must be shown on the required health certificate for the animal to be imported.

2. Breeding cattle may only be imported into Canada from the United States if the certificate presented at the time of import identifies one of the following conditions has been met for Tuberculosis:

The animal for import originates from a herd of negative status in an state that is an accredited free area for tuberculosis or a modified accredited advanced area for tuberculosis in the United States and recognized as such by the USDA.

or

The animal for import originates from a herd of negative status in a state that is a modified accredited area for tuberculosis in the United States and recognized as such by the USDA and the herd has been tested with negative results within 12 months preceding the date of importation.
C. Bluetongue (State of Florida only)

1. Breeding cattle imported from the state of Florida require a negative test for bluetongue using the cELISA test methodology within 30 days prior to import. In the case of a positive result, a PCR test must be performed with negative results for virus for the animal to qualify for export.

It is suggested that animals being sampled have both a serum sample and blood sample drawn at the same time and be sent to the lab with the request that, if the cELISA test is positive, then a PCR test is to be conducted.

Certification Statements Required to Appear on the Health (Zoosanitary) Certificate for the Import of Breeding Cattle from the United States
The export documentation must be a USDA Official Zoosanitary Export Certificate.

1. The animals were born after January 1, 1999.

2. The animals are identified by a permanent identification recognized by the USDA and are not under restriction for movement, slaughter or destruction control. The tag number and tattoo information are included in the description of the animal.

3. The animals originated from a certified brucellosis-free herd.

or

The animals originated in a brucellosis-free State from an established herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically during the 24 months prior to export.

or

The animals originated in a brucellosis-free State from an assembled herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically since the herd was assembled.

or

The animals originated in brucellosis Class A or B State from an established herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically during the 24 months prior to export. All additions to the herd during the last two years other than natural increases were negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis at least 60 days prior to the qualifying test on individual animals for export.

or

The animals originated in a Class A or B State from an assembled herd with a complete herd test within 12 months except animals under six months of age, spayed heifers and steers. All the animals were identified in the herd of origin at the time of the herd test or were natural increases born after the complete herd test. The qualifying test for individual animals for export was performed at least 60 days after the complete herd test.

(Select the applicable option)

4. The animal for export originates from a herd of negative status in an state that is an accredited free area for tuberculosis or a modified accredited advanced area for tuberculosis.

or

The animal for import originates from a herd of negative status in a state that is a modified accredited area for tuberculosis and the herd has been tested with negative results within 12 months preceding the date of importation.

(Select the applicable option)

5. i) The animals have not been vaccinated for brucellosis under the whole herd vaccination program (adult vaccination).

ii) In the case of a bull, the animal has not been vaccinated for brucellosis.

6. The animals for export have resided in the United States or Canada for at least 60 days.

7. To the best of my knowledge and belief, the animals listed on this certificate were not exposed to any communicable disease within 60 days preceding the date of inspection.

8. The animals on this certificate are included on CFIA Import number: space.
 

3waycross

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No Trich test?............and did I understand that it says that they are NOT to be Bangs vaccinated?
 

TexasBred

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Aaron":1crwewkx said:
General Requirements
1. All breeding cattle require an Import Permit issued by a CFIA office prior to the arrival of the animal at a port of entry. (Section 12.(1)(a) Health of Animals Regulations)

2. Breeding cattle imported into Canada must be born after January 1, 1999, and the animals must be identified with permanent identification that is recognized by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and are not under restriction for movement, slaughter or destruction control.

3. Breeding cattle are required to be identified with an official USDA metal eartag or a National Animal Identification System (NAIS) compliant "840" radio frequency "RF" eartag. For either method of identification, a tattoo must be in the right ear and show the letters "USA" at a minimum of 1 cm in height, or in the case of a female animal, it may be the official United States calfhood vaccination tattoo that includes the US registered shield and "V". Animals for temporary entry of a period of 90 days or less bearing an NAIS compliant "840" RF eartag are not required to have a tattoo.

4. Breeding cattle imported into Canada must have a tag applied before import or as soon as they arrive at initial destination under the national livestock identification program in accordance with section 189 of the Health of Animals Regulations unless they have been identified with a NAIS compliant "840" radio frequency "RF" eartag. The importer must report the tag information to the administrator of the program as required and within the time period specified, and as well, to the CFIA location where the importation of the animal occurred, if the tag is not already present in the animal at the time of import.

5. Breeding cattle may only be imported into Canada from the United States if the animal is transported directly to the Canada-United States border from the place of origin in the United States where the animals were tested in accordance with this document. Breeding cattle may be transported directly to the Canada-United States border from a consignment sale or a show in the United States if the animal was tested in accordance with the import conditions on the farm of origin and the animal was transported directly to the consignment sale or show from the place where it was tested. All breeding cattle and other ruminants at the consignment sale or show must have the equivalent herd status as the animals to be imported into Canada.

6. An animal that was born after its mother was tested is not required to meet the test requirements of this document if the animal is imported into Canada at the same time as its mother. An animal that was born after its mother was tested, unless it was born en route to Canada, must be identified with permanent identification and recorded on the health certificate of its mother.

7. Breeding cattle must be accompanied by a certificate of an official veterinarian of the United States or a certificate of a veterinarian licensed in the United States and endorsed by an official veterinarian of the United States. The certificate must contain the name and address of the consignor, the location where the animal is exported from and the name and address of the consignee. The certificate must also clearly identify the animal and show that the animal was inspected by a veterinarian within 30 days preceding the date of importation, that the animal was found to be free from any communicable disease and that the animal was to the best of the knowledge and belief of the veterinarian, not exposed to any communicable disease within 60 days preceding the date of the inspection.

Test Requirements for the Import of Breeding Cattle
A. Brucellosis Requirements

1. The brucellosis test for the import of breeding cattle to Canada is the standard tube test (STT) or standard plate test (SPT) with negative reading at a 1:50 dilution. The brucellosis test and result must be shown on the required health certificate for the animal to be imported:

Breeding cattle for import to Canada must not have been vaccinated for brucellosis under the Whole Herd Vaccination Program of the USDA, nor in the case of a bull, vaccinated for brucellosis.
RB51 vaccine has been used exclusively for more than 24 months in the United States for brucellosis control. The vaccine is not recognized in Canada and all animals require test for brucellosis where indicated except for steers and spayed heifers.
2. Herd of Origin Certification:

In this section the following definitions apply:

"assembled herd" means a herd that has been maintained as a herd for less than two years.
"established herd" means a herd that has been maintained as a herd for at least two years.
Breeding cattle may only be imported into Canada from the United States if the certificate presented at the time of import identifies one of the following conditions has been met for brucellosis:

The animal originates from a brucellosis-free herd, certified as such by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) irrespective of the Brucellosis status assigned to the state by the USDA and that the animal proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 30 days preceding the date of importation.

or

The animal originates in a state designated by the USDA as a Free State and the herd of origin is an established herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically during the 24 months preceding the date of importation, and that the animal proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 30 days preceding the date of import. Or, the herd of origin is an assembled herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically since the herd was assembled, and the animal for import proved negative to two serum agglutination tests for brucellosis performed at least 30 days apart with the second test occurring within 30 days of import to Canada.

or

The animal originated in a state designated by the USDA as a Class A or B State and the herd of origin of the animal is an established herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically during the previous 24 months and to which no additions were made other than natural increases, or if additions were made to the herd, the animals were subject to a negative serum agglutination test for brucellosis. The animal for import must have proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 30 days preceding the date of importation and the date of test is at least 60 days after the addition of the last animal to the herd which is not a natural increase. Or, the herd of origin of the animal for import to Canada is an assembled herd in which every animal in the herd, other than bovines less than six months of age, spayed heifers and steers proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 12 months preceding the date of importation. At the time of the test the animal for import was present and identified in the herd of origin or was a natural increase born after the test. The animal for import must have proved negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis performed within 30 days preceding the date of importation and the date of test must be at least 60 days after the assembled herd test.
B. Tuberculosis Requirements

1. The tuberculin test is the standard caudal fold injection with a reading of results at 72 hours as "No Reaction" and conducted within 60 days of import. The results of the tuberculin test must be shown on the required health certificate for the animal to be imported.

2. Breeding cattle may only be imported into Canada from the United States if the certificate presented at the time of import identifies one of the following conditions has been met for Tuberculosis:

The animal for import originates from a herd of negative status in an state that is an accredited free area for tuberculosis or a modified accredited advanced area for tuberculosis in the United States and recognized as such by the USDA.

or

The animal for import originates from a herd of negative status in a state that is a modified accredited area for tuberculosis in the United States and recognized as such by the USDA and the herd has been tested with negative results within 12 months preceding the date of importation.
C. Bluetongue (State of Florida only)

1. Breeding cattle imported from the state of Florida require a negative test for bluetongue using the cELISA test methodology within 30 days prior to import. In the case of a positive result, a PCR test must be performed with negative results for virus for the animal to qualify for export.

It is suggested that animals being sampled have both a serum sample and blood sample drawn at the same time and be sent to the lab with the request that, if the cELISA test is positive, then a PCR test is to be conducted.

Certification Statements Required to Appear on the Health (Zoosanitary) Certificate for the Import of Breeding Cattle from the United States
The export documentation must be a USDA Official Zoosanitary Export Certificate.

1. The animals were born after January 1, 1999.

2. The animals are identified by a permanent identification recognized by the USDA and are not under restriction for movement, slaughter or destruction control. The tag number and tattoo information are included in the description of the animal.

3. The animals originated from a certified brucellosis-free herd.

or

The animals originated in a brucellosis-free State from an established herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically during the 24 months prior to export.

or

The animals originated in a brucellosis-free State from an assembled herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically since the herd was assembled.

or

The animals originated in brucellosis Class A or B State from an established herd in which no evidence of brucellosis has existed either clinically or serologically during the 24 months prior to export. All additions to the herd during the last two years other than natural increases were negative to a serum agglutination test for brucellosis at least 60 days prior to the qualifying test on individual animals for export.

or

The animals originated in a Class A or B State from an assembled herd with a complete herd test within 12 months except animals under six months of age, spayed heifers and steers. All the animals were identified in the herd of origin at the time of the herd test or were natural increases born after the complete herd test. The qualifying test for individual animals for export was performed at least 60 days after the complete herd test.

(Select the applicable option)

4. The animal for export originates from a herd of negative status in an state that is an accredited free area for tuberculosis or a modified accredited advanced area for tuberculosis.

or

The animal for import originates from a herd of negative status in a state that is a modified accredited area for tuberculosis and the herd has been tested with negative results within 12 months preceding the date of importation.

(Select the applicable option)

5. i) The animals have not been vaccinated for brucellosis under the whole herd vaccination program (adult vaccination).

ii) In the case of a bull, the animal has not been vaccinated for brucellosis.

6. The animals for export have resided in the United States or Canada for at least 60 days.

7. To the best of my knowledge and belief, the animals listed on this certificate were not exposed to any communicable disease within 60 days preceding the date of inspection.

8. The animals on this certificate are included on CFIA Import number: space.

Aaron down here we can't even get all these requirements put on mexicans let alone cattle. :cry2:
 

Supa Dexta

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Never hear tell of trich testing or bangs vac around here. Had to look that up when first reading of it on online forums.
 

3waycross

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Supa Dexta":3d20qfmf said:
Never hear tell of trich testing or bangs vac around here. Had to look that up when first reading of it on online forums.

Trich is a MUCH worse problem than brucellosis or TB. We have to be constantly vigilant in order to keep it under control
 

Aaron

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3waycross":2evn90vt said:
Supa Dexta":2evn90vt said:
Never hear tell of trich testing or bangs vac around here. Had to look that up when first reading of it on online forums.

Trich is a MUCH worse problem than brucellosis or TB. We have to be constantly vigilant in order to keep it under control

Canada was declared bangs free in 1985 and quit testing (on any large scale) in 1999. Cattle from US cannot be vaccinated for it, but must test free of it.

Trich is not an issue here. Someone from AB/SK/MB can chime in, but I have never seen purebred herds in this country advertise vaccination for Trich. I know on a local level, the vets have never encountered it here in their semen testing and the majority of walking bulls here come from the Prairies.
 

suzorse

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female cattle can be bangs vaccinated ,but no adult vaccinated cows , bulls are never vaccinated
and since the bull in question is a virgin ,it dose not need to be trich tested , and a calf hood vaccinated cow will not test positive because of the vaccination, my cows are vaccinated, and they are also tested yearly for brucellosis, TB and Q Fever
Suzanne
 

Rafter S

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3waycross":2lfqkzgt said:
I haven't heard of a vaccine for Trich! We would all be using it if there was.

And in addition to what Suzanne posted, someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the trich vaccine is only good for one year, instead of life time like bangs.
 

suzorse

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read these 3 for clarification on the Brucellosis

3. Breeding cattle are required to be identified with an official USDA metal eartag or a National Animal Identification System (NAIS) compliant "840" radio frequency "RF" eartag. For either method of identification, a tattoo must be in the right ear and show the letters "USA" at a minimum of 1 cm in height, or in the case of a female animal, it may be the official United States calfhood vaccination tattoo that includes the US registered shield and "V". Animals for temporary entry of a period of 90 days or less bearing an NAIS compliant "840" RF eartag are not required to have a tattoo.

5. i) The animals have not been vaccinated for brucellosis under the whole herd vaccination program (adult vaccination).

ii) In the case of a bull, the animal has not been vaccinated for brucellosis.
Suzanne
 

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