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Rustlers and Vagrants

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Jogeephus

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After finding some calves were were missing and finding all the fences were still in good shape I figured rustlers had got the better of me. However, I was relieved to learn was only a case of vagrancy.

 

cowman30

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Looks like the calves made themselves at home. Literally!
 
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Jogeephus

Jogeephus

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MO_cows":1oejgml1 said:
That's funny! Hope the nosy little buggers don't go thru the floor!

This is a real concern of mine. I really gotta figure out how they are getting into the house and board it up before I have to extract one from the living room.

cowwrangler":1oejgml1 said:
do you supply them cable tv also?lol :)

But of course. :lol2: :lol2:
 

bigbull338

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1 thing is for sure itll take you awhile to findout how thet are getting in.an put a stop to it.
 
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Jogeephus

Jogeephus

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mnmtranching":8ojk8tfs said:
Joe is that my cabin for next Winter?

If you want it. We could call it the Lodge. I really need to toss a match in it but I rob it for lumber. Got some beautiful lumber in it and the design of the house is really neat since there are breeze-ways throughout the house. Its about 150 years old. All the lumber is hand planed and hand cut. The thought and craftmanship is really something to see.

bigbull338":8ojk8tfs said:
1 thing is for sure itll take you awhile to findout how thet are getting in.an put a stop to it.

That's the truth. You should see another house I got in the bull pen. I don't know why but the bulls insist on getting in the house. I've boarded the doors and such but one of them just tore the wall out and he tore the floor out and then just walks into the house between the floor joists. It makes no sense because I have ample shade trees for them. I guess they are just home bodies. :lol2:
 

rusty

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If you don't care how about taking more pics of that house and posting them.I appreciate the craftmanship of old homes.It makes you wonder how they are still standing compared to todays standards no footers or cinder blocks just a flat rock or cut stone for a foundation.I really like seeing the trim in old homes alot fanicer than most now days with the wide base boards and crown moulding.
 
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Jogeephus

Jogeephus

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I'd be happy to snap some shots for you. I think you would appreciate the base of the house. It is set on hewn heart pine logs in direct contact with the dirt. These logs have been there for nearly 150 years and are just as sound as ever. The rafters are neat too. They are actually pulpwood sticks but when the stick comes out from under the attic they hewed and planed the stick to make it look like a planed board. Inside walls are made out of 1/4 inch cypress, yellow poplar and pine. When planed, it is really beautiful wood. This is why I don't want to burn it down. I'd like to salvage all I can.

I took this one today before I shoed them out of the house. I think she was standing guard.



This calf on the side porch which is also the breezeway that goes through the house to the front porch. The breezeway kinda cuts the house in half. From what I have been told, the east half of the house was more for summer conditions and the west for winter. There are three fire places on the western side of the house and the kitchen was on the north end of the west section. During the summer the breezeway creates its own wind as it pulls air through it. From what I have been told, on really hot nights they would pull their cots into the breezeway to sleep. Don't know what they did about the mosquitoes though.



I'll get some shots of the building techniques tomorrow - if its not raining.
 

Calman

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It always amazed me to see those big old barns when I lived up in Ohio.Hand hued native oak beams 14in square,forty to fifty feet long and penned together with wood pins. Some three stories high.Built on a hill and a dug out basement,a first floor and then the hayloft.Not far from where I lived the hay loft was as big as a basketball court and they actually played basket ball up there.
And not to mention the weight of that old slate roof alone.Then in winter time also had a foot or two of snow on it.Sure was some kind of work getting those huge beams upright and penned.

Cal
 

FarmGirl10

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Calman":39g1catp said:
It always amazed me to see those big old barns when I lived up in Ohio.Hand hued native oak beams 14in square,forty to fifty feet long and penned together with wood pins. Some three stories high.Built on a hill and a dug out basement,a first floor and then the hayloft.Not far from where I lived the hay loft was as big as a basketball court and they actually played basket ball up there.
And not to mention the weight of that old slate roof alone.Then in winter time also had a foot or two of snow on it.Sure was some kind of work getting those huge beams upright and penned.

Cal
Calman, one of my grandpa's barns has an 80ft hand hued beam. You can't destroy those barns even if you tried. We stripped one down and moved it on a semi without it falling apart. Oddly enough we were just talking about this a week ago, I wish I could find pictures of the horse drawn cranes they used to get the beams in place.

You have to be careful with the bank barns though. :lol: I've seen a picture of a tractor hanging out the doors of the second story...my uncle still won't admit to having done it.
 

Calman

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You know there is just something about them old houses and barns long ago abanded.
If they could talk I would probably spend a lot of time listning to their stories.
I see them old houses my mind starts to wondering.
There is just something about it that interests me.

Cal
 
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Jogeephus

Jogeephus

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It impresses me how they could overcome certain obstacles with common sense and hard work instead of technology. The tools they invented, the methods they used all impress me.
 

cowman30

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Jogeephus":7esm32d6 said:
It impresses me how they could overcome certain obstacles with common sense and hard work instead of technology. The tools they invented, the methods they used all impress me.


I reckon the cows are impressed to as they tend to frequent that place alot it appears.
 

mnmtranching

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Joe, it looks like the roof is in decent shape, you know? as long as the roof is good buildings will last. I like the idea of salvage, they just can't duplicate those old buildings the hand workmanship. I think I would consider rebuilding that house. :nod: Maybe next Winter. :wave:
 

rusty

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Around here people are selling old barns for the lumber.Most are american chestnut beautiful wood.The old timers knew stuff that just baffles me.Like when to cut brush to make it not grow back as quick what time of the year to cut poplar so that the bark stays on.We tried this once and waited a year and couldn't knock the bark off with a hammer.Have any of you ever heard of the Foxfire books?Really good reads on the way things use to be done and the reasons why.
 

3waycross

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Jo I sure like the pictures of your Cow house.

Reminds me of when I was a kid. Every time my Grandpa would see a house like that that was falling down he would tell my Grandma they oughta buy that place and fix it up. Her answer was always the same." Let me know when the wind don't blow through it anymore and I'll move in."
 

LoveMoo11

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Jogeephus":22awswrs said:
It impresses me how they could overcome certain obstacles with common sense and hard work instead of technology. The tools they invented, the methods they used all impress me.
Its amazing how we think we "need" all this technology when the old timers made things a hundred times better with less. My dad's house is over two hundred years old, he bought it when I was 2 but we have pictures of it from the 1800's and there was an amazing circular barn that was attached to the house that burned down. The thing was HUGE. Our house is big but in the picture it dwarfs it. Can't say I would've wanted to be one of the guys who put on the roof :? scary.
 

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