Rumensin

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Anonymous

I read in one of my cattle newspapers about a product called rumensin that is a supplement for the cow herd...the vet column recommended it as a good supplement but that you have to be careful and not feed too much hay or alfalfa when using it...since we just moved from ten acres to twenty nine acres from eastern oregon to western oregon i am interested in this as i am feeding only pasture right now...have plenty of it and have been using a protein supplement, vit. a and selenium salt block...i am ready to reorder the protein bucket but was interested in whether anyone has used this product and found it worthwhile? I have 8 head of cows at this time..and due to all calve in april...I usually feed alfalfa and filler...thanks, sharon
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Anonymous

Rumensin is an ionaphore designed to regulate the ph of the rumen. It is usually fed to cattle on feed getting grain, where rumen upset,(acidosis, or bloat) is possible. Studies also show a 10% increase in feed utilization. <p>A newer slow release bolus is marketed for cattle on legume pasture to reduce incidence of bloating.<p>Feeding it to cows on pasture would be a total waste of money in my opinion. Sellers of the product try to get everyone to feed it to their cows, but I've never seen the benefits. Calves on feed do benefit, but cost/benefit is tough to prove.<p>Jason Trowbridge<br>Southern Angus Farms<br>Alberta Canada
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(User Above)":1zzd8dtr said:
: Rumensin is an ionaphore designed to regulate the ph of the rumen. It is usually fed to cattle on feed getting grain, where rumen upset,(acidosis, or bloat) is possible. Studies also show a 10% increase in feed utilization. <p>: A newer slow release bolus is marketed for cattle on legume pasture to reduce incidence of bloating.<p>Thanks Jason for the input...I had a feeling it may have been a "selling technique"...that's the great advantage of this site...I also found out from the person who I purchase my protein tubs from that I have that yeast enzyme in the tub and it's a natural additive and not a chemical...and he said it does the same thing...so both of you just saved me a ton of money!!! My cows are doing really good on this pasture with my selenium salt block, vit. a supplement and the protein tubs...and as long as they aren't hollering at me because they are hungry and haven't dropped off since moving them 500 miles and none of them got sick guess I can figure better keep doing what I am doing...don't fix something that doesn't need fixed!! Thanks again...Sharon<br>: Feeding it to cows on pasture would be a total waste of money in my opinion. Sellers of the product try to get everyone to feed it to their cows, but I've never seen the benefits. Calves on feed do benefit, but cost/benefit is tough to prove.<p>: Jason Trowbridge<br>: Southern Angus Farms<br>: Alberta Canada<p>
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I don't buy the line about the yeast enzyme being the same as rumensin. I have tried protien tubs and they are only helpful in some situations. Cows rarely need more than good grass. If the grass is dried up then the protien tub can help. If the cow has enough grass to eat no matter the quality, grain might be a cost effective option. If the amount of roughage is less than the cow needs, no amount of suppliment,protien tubs or whatever will help, you'll have to feed hay.<p>Jason Trowbridge<br>Southern Angus Farms<br>Alberta Canada
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(User Above)":2yr83i09 said:
: I don't buy the line about the yeast enzyme being the same as rumensin. I have tried protien tubs and they are only helpful in some situations. Cows rarely need more than good grass. If the grass is dried up then the protien tub can help. If the cow has enough grass to eat no matter the quality, grain might be a cost effective option. If the amount of roughage is less than the cow needs, no amount of suppliment,protien tubs or whatever will help, you'll have to feed hay.<p>: Jason Trowbridge<br>: Southern Angus Farms<br>: Alberta Canada<p><br>
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Anonymous

Any thoughts on supplements containing urea?We have been using some all natural ones but with less protein, found some closer to home but has urea in it. Some of our cows are bred, some springing heavy. Should we try the new tubs,& if so, how much is too much?<br> Scott in Okla.
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Urea can be a useful protien suppliment. It can be dangerous too. Safely, 1% of a cows protien requirements can be from non-feed sources like urea. If a cow needs 2 &1/2 pounds of protien per day, she could handle 1/10 of one pound of urea, 2/10 could kill her. (urea is 241% protien)<p>Urea in protien blocks is safe, as the levels of urea are very small. Chances of a cow getting close to her limit is remote. Urea does not work well for by-pass protien, the kind needed for high milk production. It works best for the rumen bugs. If a diet is close to adequate in protien, urea won't make a big difference, a low protien diet will benefit to a greater degree.<p>Jason Trowbridge<br>Southern Angus Farms<br>Alberta Canada
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(User Above)":220slene said:
: Any thoughts on supplements containing urea?We have been using some all natural ones but with less protein, found some closer to home but has urea in it. Some of our cows are bred, some springing heavy. Should we try the new tubs,& if so, how much is too much?<br>: Scott in Okla.<br>Thanks for the info,Jason. We're new to the computer scene & fairly new to the farm scene. My wife &I both were raised around it, but are just now trying it for ourselves, having bought 120 acres a few yrs. back. I see you have Angus cattle, are they blacks or reds? Just being nosey since we're raising Limousine & Simental X's with a Red bull over them. the market here likes them more than the full red's.<br>
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