Rib Eye steak on sale $12.99... why

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Alan

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Maybe this should be on the beginner board, but here it is. With the economy the way it is, I have really been watching the store ads... other than beef. I saw that boneless rib eye steak is on sale for $12.99/lb.... $2.00 off regular price. I'm getting ready to ship my calves, knowing that I will get between 80 cents to a buck a lb. for them.

I'm curious to what the steps are in processing and what kind of mark up each steps gets to make the final product (for Rib Eye, not round steak) worth $15/lb. Who makes the money, not the folks raising the calf.

Thanks,
Alan
 

Frankie

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Alan":2x4noam1 said:
Maybe this should be on the beginner board, but here it is. With the economy the way it is, I have really been watching the store ads... other than beef. I saw that boneless rib eye steak is on sale for $12.99/lb.... $2.00 off regular price. I'm getting ready to ship my calves, knowing that I will get between 80 cents to a buck a lb. for them.

I'm curious to what the steps are in processing and what kind of mark up each steps gets to make the final product (for Rib Eye, not round steak) worth $15/lb. Who makes the money, not the folks raising the calf.

Thanks,
Alan

If you sell your calves at weaning, they'll probably be owned by several people before they're served on a plate somewhere. Backgrounder, stocker, feedlot and the packer will all be lined up to turn a profit from YOUR calves. If you could retain ownership on those calves until they're hanging on the rail, you might make considerably more money from retaining ownership. Or you might lose your shirt. :) Each one of those potential owners add value to your calves and each has expenses, payroll, taxes, feed, insurance, transportaton.....

What is the quality grade on those rib eyes? The rib eye is one of the most popular cuts of meat. It's my favorite steak.

While the beef cow is still alive, different parts of its body perform more work or bear more weight than other parts. All of this strain and exercise can make those areas more lean and tough. The more tender cuts of meat are located in sections of the cow that didn't perform as much work or bear as much weight, such as the upper rib cage. This is the section of beef rib which provides such popular cuts as prime rib, standing rib roast, bone-in rib steaks and the boneless rib eye steak. When the rib section is trimmed but not separated, it is sold as a standing rib roast. If the rib section is separated into individual ribs but not deboned, it is sold as rib steak. Only when the rib bone is removed and other undesirable tail pieces are trimmed away can it be sold as a rib eye steak.

Because a ribeye steak contains significant ribbons of saturated fat or marbling, it become especially tender during the cooking process. The fat between the muscle tissue slowly melts into the meat, creating a very smooth and satisfying texture. This is why rib eye steaks are ideal for direct heat cooking methods such as grilling, broiling or pan frying. Slow roasting a rib eye steak would only cause the fat to render out of the meat, leaving a very tough and dry piece of beef in its wake. Most ribeye steak recipes call for at least a two step cooking process; a quick hot sear, followed by a slower direct heating method. Steakhouse cooks typically grill ribeyes on a grate over hot coals or gas burners.

Some steak cooks prefer to soak raw ribeye steaks in a seasoned marinade in order to infuse more flavor into the beef and tenderize it slightly. Others believe the rib eye steak is already so flavorful that all it requires is minimal seasoning and careful supervision as it cooks to the desired level of doneness. Many high-end steakhouses use a method called dry aging in order to bring out the best flavors of a ribeye steak. Exposure to the air in a cool room causes the outer surface of the meat to lose some moisture and some of the natural juices of the steak to essentially ferment before they are sent to the kitchen for preparation. A ribeye steak destined for a backyard grill or home kitchen does not have to be aged in this manner, but it should be allowed to reach room temperature just before cooking.

When shopping for a rib eye steak, a consumer should look for a substantial number of white flecks scattered throughout the meat. This is a sign of good marbling, an essential element of a quality ribeye. The meat should be a definite red, not a dull brownish-red color which indicates an undesirable aging. If a ribeye steak is marked down for quick sale, it should be prepared that same day. A good rib eye steak should also be cut fairly thick, at least one half to one inch. A thinner ribeye will be much harder to cook accurately. While the thought of a juicy two-inch-thick ribeye steak has its appeal, a home cook may want to practice with thinner cuts until he or she feels comfortable with the proper techniques of grilling and steak cooking.

Little more here: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-rib-eye-steak.htm
 

Brandonm22

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Alan you need to find a new grocer. They are NEVER that expensive here and you live a lot closer to the plants than I do. My grocer isn't on the internet; but Winn Dixie down the road in Trussville has Choice Angus ribeyes at $9.99, Choice NY Strips at 7.99, Choice Sirloins 4.99, and Choice ground round $3.49. My store is all Select and is cheaper than those prices.

http://winndixie.shoplocal.com/winndixi ... xie-091014
 

Bez+

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Alan":329d8sc9 said:
Maybe this should be on the beginner board, but here it is. With the economy the way it is, I have really been watching the store ads... other than beef. I saw that boneless rib eye steak is on sale for $12.99/lb.... $2.00 off regular price. I'm getting ready to ship my calves, knowing that I will get between 80 cents to a buck a lb. for them.

I'm curious to what the steps are in processing and what kind of mark up each steps gets to make the final product (for Rib Eye, not round steak) worth $15/lb. Who makes the money, not the folks raising the calf.

Thanks,
Alan

Prices are all over the board - all over the continent

People are charged what the market will bear and pay

Bottom line - it has been said here for months - the market is on its way down

It will be worse before it gets better.

The very large majority of people here do not do it for money and my guess is less than 5% make any money on cattle anyways. They spend more than they make or do not even know what their costs are - it is simply a hobby.

Right now the best cash return is on the goat and sheep market - anyone starting out and only raising five or so (cows) might as well buy the meat as raise it - unless they just enjoy doing it. The cost is higher than the return and if you pay processing it is even higher.

Regards

Bez+
 

grannysoo

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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and a beautiful image can be a wonderful thing.

That being said, our local Harvey's grocery store is selling select semi-boneless ribeyes for 3.99 per pound. They are sliced 1" thick, fairly well trimmed, and packed 4 - 6 in a "family pack". To be select, this is some of the best looking steaks I've seen in a grocery store. Plenty of marbling, plenty of fat flecks in the meat. The packaging however, is not so attractive.

Move over to the local Kroger grocery store now. They are selling select semi-boneless ribeyes that are 1-1/2 " thick. Individually wrapped, seasoned with seasoned salt and a little pepper, and looking good to the eye, for "only" 12.99 per pound. The meat does not look near as good as that from Harvey's.

Kroger's is 12.99 per pound. Harvey's is 3.99 per pound.

Go figure........
 

TexasBred

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talldog":2ytrsv4t said:
Your post aroused my curiousity---Here, Prime ribeyes, 12.99---Choice 7.99---Select 4.99. Amazing the difference in prices !! :tiphat:

And most folks can't look at those steaks and know one from the other, so they figure that $12.99 must be some fine eating and buy it.
 

Brandonm22

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Harveys is probably selling young cow steaks or B maturity Selects. That's why they can sell well marbled steaks so far below market. Back when we had a locally owned Piggly Wiggly, they traded in cow steaks. Some feedlots buy two year old open heifers, young cows that lost a calf, etc by the pound then fatten them. They don't even bother to grade those carcasses because they are too old to grade in the A-maturity level but if they keep the old cows out the steaks should still be good.
 

alftn

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I can not understand why people can not, make money on at least the small scale...Here at the house I have about 7 ac. got most of it fenced, my self using 5 strands of wire, and old telephone poles that the utility company gave me.. also about 150 steels..I figure it cost about 600 to fence it and of course a fair amount of labor...If I put 3 calves on it I probly get by with very littly hay, and alittle treet grain...Kill one at 18,24, and 30 months, for maybe 100$ each in grain and 250 to 300$ kill fee...Yes labor involed and hauling and butcher fee..The 3 will average 400 t0 500 lbs of beef each, that is alot of food for you family... and in these time beef on the hoof is better than money in the bank at least I think so...Plus I eat the beef that is raise by me , no sales tax, health , quality, good eating... I gave up hunting deer and put my time into my cattle, last year I had killed 5 head, 2 spring and 3 in fall, and off the top of my head at least 44 people got some of it and ate it, most had a years supply.. at little or no cost to them...I have 3 different places that I have cattle and another friend has 75 ac , mostly fenced, now he want in on the deal...If you can work with people, and have resourses it is amazing what you can do....
 

talldog

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alftn":j1cjjlp9 said:
I can not understand why people can not, make money on at least the small scale...Here at the house I have about 7 ac. got most of it fenced, my self using 5 strands of wire, and old telephone poles that the utility company gave me.. also about 150 steels..I figure it cost about 600 to fence it and of course a fair amount of labor...If I put 3 calves on it I probly get by with very littly hay, and alittle treet grain...Kill one at 18,24, and 30 months, for maybe 100$ each in grain and 250 to 300$ kill fee...Yes labor involed and hauling and butcher fee..The 3 will average 400 t0 500 lbs of beef each, that is alot of food for you family... and in these time beef on the hoof is better than money in the bank at least I think so...Plus I eat the beef that is raise by me , no sales tax, health , quality, good eating... I gave up hunting deer and put my time into my cattle, last year I had killed 5 head, 2 spring and 3 in fall, and off the top of my head at least 44 people got some of it and ate it, most had a years supply.. at little or no cost to them...I have 3 different places that I have cattle and another friend has 75 ac , mostly fenced, now he want in on the deal...If you can work with people, and have resourses it is amazing what you can do....
I, myself have done pretty good with NO grain and NEVER sold at a sale barn. Word of mouth and repeat customers has sold my beef ! :tiphat:
 

sizmic

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In response to the original question, I avg. about $250 a head improvement by retaining ownership vrs selling at the local auction house. Most of the time the ones I wouldn't get a premium for at the barn are the ones that return the most $ on the grid!!! I don't know if that helps your figures any but the buyers at the sale are going to make money too or they wouldn't be buying them!

Sizmic
 

1982vett

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alftn":a1otvkl6 said:
I can not understand why people can not, make money on at least the small scale...Here at the house I have about 7 ac. got most of it fenced, my self using 5 strands of wire, and old telephone poles that the utility company gave me.. also about 150 steels..I figure it cost about 600 to fence it and of course a fair amount of labor...If I put 3 calves on it I probly get by with very littly hay, and alittle treet grain...Kill one at 18,24, and 30 months, for maybe 100$ each in grain and 250 to 300$ kill fee...Yes labor involed and hauling and butcher fee..The 3 will average 400 t0 500 lbs of beef each, that is alot of food for you family... and in these time beef on the hoof is better than money in the bank at least I think so...Plus I eat the beef that is raise by me , no sales tax, health , quality, good eating... I gave up hunting deer and put my time into my cattle, last year I had killed 5 head, 2 spring and 3 in fall, and off the top of my head at least 44 people got some of it and ate it, most had a years supply.. at little or no cost to them...I have 3 different places that I have cattle and another friend has 75 ac , mostly fenced, now he want in on the deal...If you can work with people, and have resourses it is amazing what you can do....

Did you know....If you claim any expenses or depreciation in raising those animals off your taxes you should also include fair market value of the animals you eat or give away as income?
 

Aero

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1982vett":r5lqbc05 said:
Did you know....If you claim any expenses or depreciation in raising those animals off your taxes you should also include fair market value of the animals you eat or give away as income?

of course... that's what we all do! :lol2:
 

grannysoo

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Aero":1anmjsaa said:
1982vett":1anmjsaa said:
Did you know....If you claim any expenses or depreciation in raising those animals off your taxes you should also include fair market value of the animals you eat or give away as income?

of course... that's what we all do! :lol2:

:nod: :nod: :nod: :nod: :nod: :nod:
 

Brandonm22

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Aero":8gyukmqi said:
1982vett":8gyukmqi said:
Did you know....If you claim any expenses or depreciation in raising those animals off your taxes you should also include fair market value of the animals you eat or give away as income?

of course... that's what we all do! :lol2:

IF we want to be super technical and totally honest, you need to report the gain at freezer beef prices or even retail rather than as feeder calf prices!
 

backhoeboogie

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1982vett":1y7ilsd2 said:
Did you know....If you claim any expenses or depreciation in raising those animals off your taxes you should also include fair market value of the animals you eat or give away as income?

The old lying cheat practice is biting a few folks now. If it has a trace, you buy it at the sale barn and you haul it to the butcher in a few months, write it off as dead, you're going to get bit. Criminal record and tax evasion. Big brother can now watch that. It could also cost you your career if your employer does regular background checks.
 

talldog

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backhoeboogie":3kptvyic said:
1982vett":3kptvyic said:
Did you know....If you claim any expenses or depreciation in raising those animals off your taxes you should also include fair market value of the animals you eat or give away as income?

The old lying cheat practice is biting a few folks now. If it has a trace, you buy it at the sale barn and you haul it to the butcher in a few months, write it off as dead, you're going to get bit. Criminal record and tax evasion. Big brother can now watch that. It could also cost you your career if your employer does regular background checks.
Cheat----That's a TALL assumption !! Big Brother and Employers---I'll Pass ! :tiphat:
 

Brandonm22

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What grocer sells Kobe??? I haven't seen Prime in the meatcase in years around here. The Piggly Wiggly in Odenville sells CAB. Other than that, this is a Select market.
 

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