Reverse stockpile

Help Support CattleToday:

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
16,707
Reaction score
1,230
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
I would think they lose more nutritional value and palatability than doing it the 'normal' way, but when you're in a pinch, it's still food
 

Stocker Steve

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2005
Messages
11,322
Reaction score
642
Location
Central Minnesota
callmefence":24to2so8 said:
Any value in stockpiling cool season grasses
Only some stands will support stockpiling. Standard advise is a min of 30% fescue.
Only some climates will stockpiling. Dry is better.
Value depends on your goals and the alternatives. Finishing grass fed animals is very different from carrying dry cows...
 

TexasBred

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
30,831
Reaction score
349
Location
Heart of Texas
Nesikep":r5eyj2g0 said:
I would think they lose more nutritional value and palatability than doing it the 'normal' way, but when you're in a pinch, it's still food
In Texas it would be only filler with very little nutritional value but as someone else once said "it will make a turd".
 

Ebenezer

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 25, 2015
Messages
2,105
Reaction score
106
Location
Piedmont of SC
Only thing that we can do that with is excess growth of clovers, like ball, and vetch. Otherwise it is a trip thru to graze dry seedheads and weeds, scattered Johnson grass, ...
 

Banjo

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
1,553
Reaction score
273
Location
Ky
callmefence":2ajhxt60 said:
Common practice to stockpile warm season grassesfor winter.
Any value in stockpiling cool season grasses for summer. Oats, ryegrass, clover, speargrass, rescue.,?
I probably wouldn't plant any just for that, but if you already have it growing I would set some aside and see what happens. It is going to cover the ground and provide a cooler climate at the soil level.
BTW I thought you were supposed to stockpile cool season grasses for winter.......
 

regolith

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2009
Messages
2,795
Reaction score
1
Location
New Zealand
We call it deferred grazing here (ryegrass and clover) and basically what happens is the grass grows tall, seeds, dies and falls over and an undergrowth of clover, weeds and less mature grass comes through the dead stuff... depends what your growth rates are and how long you leave it ungrazed.
Defering from late spring through to early autumn if you have a surplus, can be a useful way of allowing a pasture to renew itself via reseeding while storing up some low quality tucker for low production animals to eat at a time when the summer dry has drastically reduced pasture availability.
 

HDRider

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
6,964
Reaction score
1,146
Location
NE Arkansas
skyhightree1":34gqtfab said:
I try to stock pile any season grasses that I can because you never know whats going to come around the pike.
Down the pike, around the corner :lol: :lol: :lol: :cboy:
 
OP
callmefence

callmefence

Hobby rancher
Joined
Mar 7, 2016
Messages
8,214
Reaction score
2,317
Location
Fencemans place...central Texas
Banjo":3f5fxq91 said:
callmefence":3f5fxq91 said:
Common practice to stockpile warm season grassesfor winter.
Any value in stockpiling cool season grasses for summer. Oats, ryegrass, clover, speargrass, rescue.,?
I probably wouldn't plant any just for that, but if you already have it growing I would set some aside and see what happens. It is going to cover the ground and provide a cooler climate at the soil level.
BTW I thought you were supposed to stockpile cool season grasses for winter.......

We get in as big a tight in summer as winter.
It's common practice to allow grass such as Klein and crabgrass and some Bermudas to make seed in late summer and be frost killed, then graze in winter as standing hay.
This year there is a tremendous surplus of cool season grasses that will soon expire.
Much in unsuitable locations to hay.

regolith":3f5fxq91 said:
We call it deferred grazing here (ryegrass and clover) and basically what happens is the grass grows tall, seeds, dies and falls over and an undergrowth of clover, weeds and less mature grass comes through the dead stuff... depends what your growth rates are and how long you leave it ungrazed.
Defering from late spring through to early autumn if you have a surplus, can be a useful way of allowing a pasture to renew itself via reseeding while storing up some low quality tucker for low production animals to eat at a time when the summer dry has drastically reduced pasture availability.

Thanks, exactly the situation I feel I'm heading towards.
 

Latest posts

Top