Retirement

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shaz

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I agree. That is why I do not like investing lump sums. I prefer just to buy in a little every month for years and years. I'm a dollar cost average person.
That what I do with index funds but I also buy individual stocks. May dollar cost avg those purchases too but really depends my conviction level. This is also influenced by paying zero commission of course.
 

Son of Butch

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Fidelity investment analysis of over 30 million 401K accounts found 412,000 accounts valued at over 1 million dollars at end of the 2nd quarter of 2021
up 84% from a year ago.
A 1 million dollar 401K retirement account puts you in the top 3/4 of the top 2%
Congratulations if you are one of them.
 

FarmerShell

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My Dad is the sole owner of the LLC which legally owns the ranch but he is hands off of the management. When all this first came about he was mildly interested and went to a pecan short course at Texas A&M with me but his interest quickly faded. He let me know it is coming to me after he passes and I was present for the signing of the Will so at some point I will be the sole owner.

I have a younger sister who is not agriculturally inclined and my two cousins were never in serious consideration (lack of interest and an unwillingness to relocate) so it was up to me or the ranch would be gone. Considering what I've seen from the other properties in the area that came up for sale it would be subdivided into as many little ranchette lots as whatever developer could make.

What's wrong with the world today. 🙌🏾
 

Little Joe

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I agree. That is why I do not like investing lump sums. I prefer just to buy in a little every month for years and years. I'm a dollar cost average person.
That's what we do, the wife and I both max out our Roth annually. It's set up to automatically be deposited out of my check and deposited into a money market account, on the 20th of every month it automatically takes it out of the money market and invests in our Roth distributing it across the investments we've picked at the percentages we've set for each one. I used to time the market and make a call to have it invested, I did well at that but it stressed me out so I just set it up to do it automatically. I'm hoping Buffet's strategy of " time in the market beats timing the market" works out over time.
 

Son of Butch

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I did well at that but it stressed me out, so I just set it up to do it automatically. I'm hoping Buffet's strategy of " time in the market beats timing the market" works out over time.
It's not education or IQ that separates people who do really well at investing from people who do really bad. It's whether you keep control over your emotions. Effort does not correlate to success in investing. By and large it's the opposite, save the effort and buy the index fund. - Morgan Housel author of The Psychology Money

"Don't look for the needle in the haystack Just buy the haystack." - Jack Bogle
Vanguard CEO and creator of the first index fund
 

Son of Butch

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Common recommendation for emergency funds is 3-6 months of living expenses.
The typical American household falls short of that goal.
The Median household emergency fund currently has $5,000
Baby Boomers 56-75 average $10,000 in emergency funds
 

Son of Butch

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Fidelity stock investment research - 5 million people - 10 year time period
Women out performed men by an average of 0.04% per year for 10 yrs. (.4% total)
#1 reason - women averaged longer buy and hold time periods, while men made more frequent trades.
 
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Stocker Steve

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Fidelity stock investment research - 5 million people - 10 year time period
Women out performed men by an average of 0.04% per year for 10 yrs. (.4% total)
#1 reason - women averaged longer buy and hold time periods, while men made more frequent trades.
So women are controlling their investing emotions better?
 

shaz

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Fidelity stock investment research - 5 million people - 10 year time period
Women out performed men by an average of 0.04% per year for 10 yrs. (.4% total)
#1 reason - women averaged longer buy and hold time periods, while men made more frequent trades.
Sold a lot of stock that I regret.
Sold NIO at $3.00 because I bought it at 1.70 the week before.
 

Son of Butch

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Bear markets are only identified in hindsight because they begin with a whimper rather than a bang.

I'm wondering if a bear market might have started with the last high set on September 3rd, the market has been drifting lower ever since.
I saw a report putting the odds of a 20% drop in Oct 2021 at 500-1
extreme long shot... but not zero. :) lol
September inflation report vs year ago came in at 5.4% today. The highest in 13 yrs.
My fear (but not a bold prediction) we are in a bear market that will last 6 months September 2021 - March 2022

26 bear markets since the 1 year bear market of Sept 1899-1900
The last 5 official bear markets
3 months July - Sept 1998
18 months March-Sept 2000-01
9.3 months Jan- Oct 2002
13.6 months Oct-Nov 2007-2008
2.1 months Jan-March 2009

The longest bear market was the great depression a market drop of 89%
2 yrs 10 months Sept 1929-July 1932
followed by
12 months March-March 1937-38
 
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Son of Butch

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age 70 is full ss retirement.
The government raised it a couple of decades ago, but for political and social acceptance they didn't explain it that way. Instead they changed 'full retirement' to various ages by birth year and said they were paying premiums for delaying ss payments up to age 70 when in reality just word play with the truth.

ie
born in 1955 retire at 62 ss = 57.7% of ss at 70
at 63 ss = 60.6%
at 65 ss = 70.1%
at 67 ss = 81.81%
at 68 ss = 87.87%
at 69 ss = 93.93%
born in 1962 ss at 62 = 56.5% of ss at 70
at 63 ss = 60.5%
at 65 ss = 69.9%
at 67 ss = 80.6%
68 ss = 87.1%
69 ss = 93.55%
70 ss 100%
 

Rafter S

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age 70 is full ss retirement.
The government raised it a couple of decades ago, but for political and social acceptance they didn't explain it that way. Instead they changed 'full retirement' to various ages by birth year and said they were paying premiums for delaying ss payments up to age 70 when in reality just word play with the truth.

ie
born in 1955 retire at 62 ss = 57.7% of ss at 70
at 63 ss = 60.6%
at 65 ss = 70.1%
at 67 ss = 81.81%
at 68 ss = 87.87%
at 69 ss = 93.93%
born in 1962 ss at 62 = 56.5% of ss at 70
at 63 ss = 60.5%
at 65 ss = 69.9%
at 67 ss = 80.6%
68 ss = 87.1%
69 ss = 93.55%
70 ss 100%

Has anyone done the math to see if you waited until 70 how many years it would take to catch up to the same dollar total as if you started at 62? I'm guessing you'd need to be close to 80. If you put that money into a decent mutual fund for those 8 years I doubt if you'd ever catch up.
 

Son of Butch

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supposedly it's calculated to balance out no matter what age you start collecting ss benefits at average life expectancy, which I think they put at 82
But if you live past 82 you get scrxwed the earlier you start collecting and of course if you die before then you get scrxwed too
so fairest way is for everyone to die at exactly 82 :)
 
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sstterry

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Has anyone done the math to see if you waited until 70 how many years it would take to catch up to the same dollar total as if you started at 62? I'm guessing you'd need to be close to 80. If you put that money into a decent mutual fund for those 8 years I doubt if you'd ever catch up.
A lot depends on when you were born. But it averages right around 78 as the break-even point.

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/an...alculate-my-social-security-breakeven-age.asp
 

Son of Butch

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Has anyone done the math to see if you waited until 70 how many years it would take to catch up to the same dollar total as if you started at 62?
I'm guessing you'd need to be close to 80.
Assuming ss benefit of $2000 month at 70 and born in 1962 collect 56.5%
2000 m at 70 x 56.5% = 1130 month at 62

2000 x 12 = 24,000 yr age 70
1130 x 12 = 13,560 yr age 62
62 + 18 = 80
13,560 x 18 yrs = 244,080
starting at 62 at 13,560 yr = 244,080 collected by age 80
starting at 70 at 24,000 yr = 240,000 collected by age 80
13,560 x 19 yrs = 257,640 at 81
24,000 x 11 yrs = 264,000 at 81

breakeven = approximately age 80 yrs 8 months
check your ss statement to do your own calculations
 
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