retirement

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herofan

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Nesikep":a7jomccn said:
I bet this is an April Fools joke!

That's possible, and all the people acting like retirement is somehow a negative or a chore. I honestly think I can handle retirement. I think it would be tough for me to not enjoy being retired. So yeah, possible April Fool's joke. :D
 

Bright Raven

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dun":2qbw3l4u said:
ez14.":2qbw3l4u said:
dun":2qbw3l4u said:
My condolences
yeah i dont think id like being retired
It ain;t always what it's cracked up to be

Exactly, there is no magical transformation that occurs at retirement. Expectations are high and the first few weeks can be riding the "high". Then you realize living is an experience that requires effort.

A rewarding, joyful and satisfying lifestyle is a product of the mind. Some people are wired to be happy some unfortunately are not. I even think it is sometimes a choice.

It is too simple to say "some people see the glass half empty and some see it half full". If a person can reach the level of realization that life is more a function of what is occurring in the mind than it is what is occurring outside our head, the battle is won or at least you have a sword and a shield to do battle with the elements.
 

herofan

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Bright Raven":3qo4440y said:
A rewarding, joyful and satisfying lifestyle is a product of the mind. Some people are wired to be happy some unfortunately are not. I even think it is sometimes a choice.

I think you have hit on something here. I think I am just wired to be happy. As long as my health is good with myself and among my family and I have a roof over my head, my "default" mood setting is happy.

I am the type of person who wakes up happy and content, and something negative has to happen to bring that into the discontent category; however, I think some people have to work at being happy and content; there has to be a constant action plan.

I don't know if some people here are joking about retirement possibly being a negative thing, but if they are serious, that is a concept I can't wrap my brain around. That doesn't even start to compute with me.
 

Bright Raven

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herofan":2rkxqgjk said:
Bright Raven":2rkxqgjk said:
A rewarding, joyful and satisfying lifestyle is a product of the mind. Some people are wired to be happy some unfortunately are not. I even think it is sometimes a choice.

I think you have hit on something here. I think I am just wired to be happy. As long as my health is good with myself and among my family and I have a roof over my head, my "default" mood setting is happy.

I am the type of person who wakes up happy and content, and something negative has to happen to bring that into the discontent category; however, I think some people have to work at being happy and content; there has to be a constant action plan.

I don't know if some people here are joking about retirement possibly being a negative thing, but if they are serious, that is a concept I can't wrap my brain around. That doesn't even start to compute with me.

I too have come by a happy nature. I am sure it comes from my maternal side. Mom would get up laughing if she fell in cow shyt.

They are not joking. You have to go through it to understand it. I had a very engaging career, and even with my happy nature, I lament not having the daily excitement of my career.
 

herofan

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Bright Raven":ysbz6xxu said:
herofan":ysbz6xxu said:
Bright Raven":ysbz6xxu said:
A rewarding, joyful and satisfying lifestyle is a product of the mind. Some people are wired to be happy some unfortunately are not. I even think it is sometimes a choice.

I think you have hit on something here. I think I am just wired to be happy. As long as my health is good with myself and among my family and I have a roof over my head, my "default" mood setting is happy.

I am the type of person who wakes up happy and content, and something negative has to
happen to bring that into the discontent category; however, I think some people have to work at being happy and content; there has to be a constant action plan.

I don't know if some people here are joking about retirement possibly being a negative thing, but if they are serious, that is a concept I can't wrap my brain around. That doesn't even start to compute with me.

I too have come by a happy nature. I am sure it comes from my maternal side. Mom would get up laughing if she fell in cow shyt.

They are not joking. You have to go through it to understand it. I had a very engaging career, and even with my happy nature, I lament not having the daily excitement of my career.


I suppose mine comes from my upbringing. For one, my mom was a stay at home mom. While she did everything that needed doing at home, we weren't in a frenzy all the time. I wasn't involved in all the school stuff, so we weren't on the road going from one event to the other.
Life was pretty laid back.

My dad worked a good paying factory job and helped my grandfather on the farm, but again, not like chickens with their heads off.

I guess what stuck with me is that I never saw a reason to be any other way. We had all we needed plus some, so it seemed like our lifestyle worked just fine. My parents always seemed content and they weren't complainers, so I'm sure that rubbed off on me too.

I guess leading life to its fullest to me is having what you need and being able to smell the roses at the same time.

So, I think I will enjoy retirement quite well, and I don't think it will take a strategic plan; I'll just go with the flow.
 

True Grit Farms

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You guy's are over thinking retirement. The lazy people get lazier and the working folks stay so busy doing nothing that they can't find the time to go fishing. Enjoy yourself Dave and stay out of trouble.
 

herofan

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True Grit Farms":3aqx0ie8 said:
You guy's are over thinking retirement. The lazy people get lazier and the working folks stay so busy doing nothing that they can't find the time to go fishing. Enjoy yourself Dave and stay out of trouble.

I will agree with that; certainly a lot of overthinking going on over retirement.
 

Bright Raven

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True Grit Farms":17tkerbn said:
You guy's are over thinking retirement. The lazy people get lazier and the working folks stay so busy doing nothing that they can't find the time to go fishing. Enjoy yourself Dave and stay out of trouble.

Very true.
 

TCRanch

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True Grit Farms":3dgh5a5f said:
You guy's are over thinking retirement. The lazy people get lazier and the working folks stay so busy doing nothing that they can't find the time to go fishing. Enjoy yourself Dave and stay out of trouble.

Very true! We were fortunate to "retire" early and one of the main reasons we bought this ranch is so my husband could spend quality time hunting & fishing (it has a 60 acre watershed lake). Then we bought cattle and life has never been the same. In a good way :). I am a hunting widow but fishing has made it to the lower level of the priority list.

Wishing you a very happy retirement, Dave, and congratulations!
 

TexasBred

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Do as you dam well please when you want to. i love having no routine and just playing it by ear. Some days wife and I seem to be really busy whether its working on the place, traveling or whatever. Other times it's little more than "take it easy" time. Still amazes me how much we do on the spur of the moment. Totally unplanned.
 

greybeard

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After 4 years, I'm finally starting to settle into the lack of a working-for-the-other-guy routine.
Of course, there's still what my wife requires of me, all the doctor visits, and all the rest of what life demands...
 

hurleyjd

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Caustic Burno":298tn4yu said:
ez14.":298tn4yu said:
dun":298tn4yu said:
My condolences
yeah i dont think id like being retired
That choice is not always left up to you
Agree we do not always have the option of retiring when we planned. Was planning to work until 65 but was let go august 2002 6 months before my 62 birthday. But my wife and I started planning for retirement many years before. We did get some help from parents that left us some inheritance and we invested instead of spending it. Also when you are young there are a lot of things you may plan to do in retirement that would be fun at the moment you are in your present time of life when planning. But when you reach the time of retirement you will find out that your can do can not keep up with your want to.






























.othat time of lifewea
 

herofan

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TexasBred":2gdglsj0 said:
Do as you dam well please when you want to. i love having no routine and just playing it by ear. Some days wife and I seem to be really busy whether its working on the place, traveling or whatever. Other times it's little more than "take it easy" time. Still amazes me how much we do on the spur of the moment. Totally unplanned.

Now that sounds like my idea of retirement and what I always thought retirement was all about.

I guess some people just require different things to function. I never needed to be on someone else's time clock in order to function or be happy. I think it would be the greatest thing in the world to not be on a schedule and just do what I want when I want, and sometimes that may be a whole lot of nothing.

I realize there are things going on in life that need attention, but somehow that is just different with me, its not like punching a clock.

Aside from my upbringing having an influence, I'm sure being a teacher helps as well. I get summers off, so I get a three month sampling of retirement every year, and so far, I've enjoyed it quite well.
 

farmerjan

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Congrats Dave!!!! Hope you can take a deep breath, enjoy some of the things that were always pushed back. You will probably find that you are as busy as you want to be. And hopefully able to enjoy doing what you want to do on a less regimented time schedule.
 

D2Cat

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Yep, enjoy it. Had a friend, 62 years old, rolled his 18 wheeler last week. He was looking forward to retirement. His services were the 28th. Things change in an instant.

What if you woke up tomorrow with only what you gave thanks for today?
 

herofan

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D2cat, that's sad. I know a lady who could have retired 8 years before she did, but she just kept saying, " one more year, one more year," and it was not for financial reasons. I don't think she even knew the real reason. When she finally did retire, she got cancer and died within a year.

I can remember her saying several times while she was sick that she wished she had went ahead and retired as soon as she could have instead of continuing to work.

Sometimes I kick myself because if I had started my career earlier, I could have retired at age 49, but now I'm having to go until 54.
 

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