Rent prices

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denoginnizer

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What does a acre rent for in your part of the world and what is the rule of thumb cow per acre in your area? I think the average price in my part of Alabama is around 20 dollars per acre. In general, 3-5 acres per cow is the rule of thumb here.
 

frenchie

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denoginnizer":sx1b3doi said:
What does a acre rent for in your part of the world and what is the rule of thumb cow per acre in your area? I think the average price in my part of Alabama is around 20 dollars per acre. In general, 3-5 acres per cow is the rule of thumb here.

goverment lease runs about $6.00 per A.um here.

Private rent from 5- 30U.S per acre carry capacity is 3-5 acres to feed a cow yr round on the good land .

Poor stuff 30-40 acres a cow yr round
 

Dee

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The Catholic church in town has a quarter they lease rent on auction for a two year term. Has a decent crick, and an alright corral. Cattle in May 15th, and out October 15th. One pair per two acres, and last year it went for $74 per acre.
 

Jake

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Dee":heh1vuw7 said:
The Catholic church in town has a quarter they lease rent on auction for a two year term. Has a decent crick, and an alright corral. Cattle in May 15th, and out October 15th. One pair per two acres, and last year it went for $74 per acre.

don't know for sure by the acre... depends on area and owner. somewhere between $130-180 per pair for the summer. 4-6 acres per pair.
 

Bama

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In North West Alabama we can easily run a pair per acre. We have fescue and bermuda mix. In the summer the bermuda really grows in the heat. Come fall the fescue will take off and we don't fertlize much at all. We do lime on a regular basis. In a normal year we don't start feeding hay until about the middle or late December. In the spring we usually stop feeding hay by march to mid march. Just be careful turning them out into new growth fescue. We ain't never had a problem with bulls being sterile. If a cow ever misses she is gone in a very short time.
 

Dee

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Someone better at math may be able to do this for us.... but I am wondering if we are all pretty close, considering some that are paying $25 per acre need 8 acres per cow, and Some pay $75 per acre but only need 2 acres per animal.
 

Bama

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As far as rent prices I don't really know what it is around here. I would take a guess as to it being around 25 to 35. I know that there are programs that some folks around here use. You can get pines planted and get about 75 per acre. Most cropland is rented for around 25 to 30. I have never rented any pasture. I can buy good hay for $20 a 900 lb roll. Bermuda hay is $2.75 a 40lb bale delivered to my barnloft.
 

joe

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about $75 an acre on the SD side, which you can do a pair per 2 acres, or $40 an acre on the MN side but you need about 5 acres per pair. Short, dry, and hills, dosn't grow much grass. I think Dee has the right idea. (sorry, have'nt figured out how to quote yet)
 

TheBullLady

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$10 an acre for mesquite native pasture, up to $25 per acre for improved coastal, good fences, etc.

3 - 5 acres needed per cow / calf unit in this area.
 

Bama

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Pretty much. The only exceptions are extreme weather conditions. We have had some drought in years past when we had to cut back. I guess I should add this land has had cattle grazing on it for about 50 years. It is very fertile. We also had a problem several years back when we fertilized it with chicken litter. The grass grew great but the next year we were covered up in wild buttercups. I sprayed and got these under control. There was a lot of pastures around here that were covered with them. That was about 10 years ago and I still have to spray anually with outlaw to keep them from invading from neighbors pasture. The fescue will support them in the winter to a certain degree. We feed hay from about late December to early March. I also give them about 2 pounds of cattle pellets each per day during the winter. We get very little snow around here. maybe once a year, we get ice about 2 time a year. During these times the cattle will stay at the hay all day. A typical day I feed at noon. The cattle have been eating a little hay and will be lying chewing their cud near the feedtrough. After eating their limited grain they will eat a little more hay before heading to the pasture. The bermuda is brown now but they are still grazing the fescue. Most other pastures around here can also support a cow and calf per acre, even with the weeds. They just feed more hay than I do in winter.
 

sidney411

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I'm renting a 120 acre place for $20 an acre. I have 1 bull, 32 cows that have 13 calves at the moment on it. There is a tank and a long winding creek, and a lot of brush/trees on it. I'm not sure exactly how much of it is open pasture, maybe half. So its about 3.75 acres per cow/calf unit and $75 per pair per year, year round.
 

Bama

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Land around here is priced by 3 things - location, location, and location. The area I live in is not very populated, but is getting that way. Land on a lake front can run as much as $50,000 to $100,000 per acre. Land next to a major hiway will run $10,000+ per acre for a few acres. More acreage will be cheaper of course. Land that is going to be developed for housing will go for more also. Land that don't border a major hiway will be around $3,000 to $5,000 per acre, if it is developed. Farmland that has roadfrontage will be around $2,000 to $3,000 per acre. Some pasture land still goes for less than a $1,000 per acre. Then there is the mountainous land that will go for around $500 per acre. There was a farm of 80 acres near here that went for $42,000 at auction. It was sold for $80,000 less than a year later to a man that put up 6 chicken houses on it. I wish I could answer your question better but it has more to do with who wants it and for what.

BAMA
 

Beefy

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South Georgia- $2000/acre -$4500 swampy pasture land, farmland, -homesites (minifarms). $20-30 rent. can get by with 1acre per pair, recommended 1.5 to 2.
 

haybalin fool

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Hey Bama,

You ought to try a product called Grazon P+D. It will run around $6/acre but will kill for atleast 60 days (broadleaf only.) We use litter as our only source for fertilizer and we spray twice a year. We've got the best stand of grass around, and the cleanest too! It'll work on tall grass/weeds, all the way down to spraying the day after you bale a hayfield, I've done both. Cattle can remain on the pasture while you spray, but don't move them onto a legume field for atleast 7 days. Anywhere they urinate or deficate, it'll be dead.
 
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