red from black???

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Anonymous

The black baldy can pass a red gene, assuming she is not homozygous black, but I would thinnk the Charolais would pass a diluter gene that would make the calf appear yellow. My grasp of this whole diluter gene is rather shadowy at best. Aneighbor has a bunch of black cows bred to a black bull and most of the calves came out white, no charolais bull in the neighborhood. It almost appears to me that diluter genes are dominant, sometimes!

dun

> i was wonderin can a red
> calf(similar to red angus) come
> from a charolais bull and a black
> baldy cow
 
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Anonymous

I always thought that there would be no diluter gene present with two black parents. The calves should be either black or possibly red if parents are hetro black. Never heard of white calves out of two black animals before. Can any Black breeders explain this one?

> The black baldy can pass a red
> gene, assuming she is not
> homozygous black, but I would
> thinnk the Charolais would pass a
> diluter gene that would make the
> calf appear yellow. My grasp of
> this whole diluter gene is rather
> shadowy at best. Aneighbor has a
> bunch of black cows bred to a
> black bull and most of the calves
> came out white, no charolais bull
> in the neighborhood. It almost
> appears to me that diluter genes
> are dominant, sometimes!

> dun
 
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Anonymous

The expected color from this cross would be a tan white face, or yellow white face depending on your description of the color.

If the Charolais had the red gene it is theoritically possible for the calf to be red.

In the case Dun mentioned, black cows and a black bull, the assumption of any breed is impossible. There is black anything, so those animals could have reciessive color genes for any color. At times when a bull has a recessive gene, it appears he always throws that one. I have heard of Angus bulls with a red gene that throw more red than black calves, when you would expect the ratio to be 50:50.

One more thing there appears to be is what is reffered to as a wild color gene that throws all the rules out the window.

No wonder you should always use a purebred bull from an established breeder.

Jason

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Anonymous

Yea, heaven forbid if you happened to get a calf that wasn't the PC color. What a tragedy.
 
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Anonymous

If you use registered breeding stock with obtainable photos and/or color descriptions of their ancestors, then you have a much better chance of getting the color you want. Just because the dam and sire are the same (solid) color doesn't mean that the offspring will be the same color. Recessive genes (good or bad) have a way of popping up (re: Murphy's Laws). Also, did a white bull get into the cow's bedroom one night and have a good time?
 
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Anonymous

A smart fellow like yourself should offer your talents to the entire industry. I think your time is being wasted here on this forum. Call Clay Center, Call NCBA, call anyone who will listen. The difference between making a profit and not making one, in the cattle business hinges on hide color. WOW! Got any more brilliant insights into the business, for us?
 
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Anonymous

i can't do anything but agree. i have always failed to understand the idea that colour has anything to do with the quality of an animal. it should be the last trait you look at, unless it's for climatic reasons, and then black is in any case the least desirable colour.

so, breed black, that way you can never go wrong!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

> Black Angus

yes, but not black limousin, black simmenthal or black whatever for the sake of being black.

colour doesn't matter a single bit when it comes to quality, what you can say is that a certain breed with a certain colour has certain qualities, but you must never forget that those qualities are not related to the colour, but to uncountable different genetic factors.

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

Even in the registered cattle business the dilluter gene plays its course, and is nearly impossible to fight. I have simmentals and angus, all colors. I am aiming for black cattle to show, but i do enjoy my reds. to beat the dilluter gene we often breed red yellow brown tan or any color that is obviously dilluted, to a purebred red simmy bull, that does not carry a dilluter gene, you should get a red calf, then breed the red calf to a Black homozygous simmental bull, and you should get black. when we do it this way we get more black then when we try to beat the system, and we get fewer browns and silvers which are even less desired then red with spots. pay attention to the ancestry, but sometimes, you get totally stumped...how about a silver calf, out of a brown cow, with 2 black parents, both grand parents on each side one is red one is black...the calf sire is a red horned fullblood...calf is silver with a white face....we expected red, it happens but its rare.
 
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Anonymous

Probably no one knows the ins and outs of the diluter gene than someone trying to raise black Simmys out traditional or red cows with a diluter gene. Can you get a white calf out of two black parents? With your silver calf I suspect your horned fullblood bull must carry the diluter gene. What's the sire and dam out of on that bull?

> Even in the registered cattle
> business the dilluter gene plays
> its course, and is nearly
> impossible to fight. I have
> simmentals and angus, all colors.
> I am aiming for black cattle to
> show, but i do enjoy my reds. to
> beat the dilluter gene we often
> breed red yellow brown tan or any
> color that is obviously dilluted,
> to a purebred red simmy bull, that
> does not carry a dilluter gene,
> you should get a red calf, then
> breed the red calf to a Black
> homozygous simmental bull, and you
> should get black. when we do it
> this way we get more black then
> when we try to beat the system,
> and we get fewer browns and
> silvers which are even less
> desired then red with spots. pay
> attention to the ancestry, but
> sometimes, you get totally
> stumped...how about a silver calf,
> out of a brown cow, with 2 black
> parents, both grand parents on
> each side one is red one is
> black...the calf sire is a red
> horned fullblood...calf is silver
> with a white face....we expected
> red, it happens but its rare.
 
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Anonymous

when the buyer is bidding on cattle he is the one who decides and if you get more for black it is good business to give the buyer what he will pay more for. most of them can tell what kind of black is in them by the frame and build. he is selling to a buyer that dictates to him what to buy so he can make money. i like the different colors too. but business is business. i can't do anything but agree. i
> have always failed to understand
> the idea that colour has anything
> to do with the quality of an
> animal. it should be the last
> trait you look at, unless it's for
> climatic reasons, and then black
> is in any case the least desirable
> colour.

> so, breed black, that way you can
> never go wrong!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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