red cedar tree removal

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Silver

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I don't know about mulched red cedar, up here we have a mostly aspen, poplar, willow and such. If it's mulched it takes a pile of nitrogen applied to it to decompose it.
 

dun

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BRYANT":2tod35mb said:
dun":2tod35mb said:
We do things a bit different here. We're trying to get quail re-established. It's worked pretty well on the current farm and I'm hoping it will work as well or better on the new one. If the cedars are out in the pasture or just along the edge of the timber we cut them and push them into big brush piles around the edges of clearings. If they are along the edges of a small clearing we hinge cut them about 3 foot above the ground and use that as a base for other cedars to make quail habitat.
I am not into Quail hunting that much, but still would not mind seeing more Quail, I do see a covey fairly often. I might try that. Do you trim the lower branches off on the ones that you hinge cut so that it wont grow back?
The ones we hinge have branches above the cut. If the had them below it the tree would probably make a good base for a brush pile even longer.
 

Texasmark

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Ebenezer":2fqgzhzb said:
BRYANT":2fqgzhzb said:
Would it make a difference if the sap is up or down on how long it takes a cedar stump to rot away? Other wise will the time of year that you cut/shear them make any difference on how long it takes for the snag to rot?
Don't think so. Will take about as long to rot as a fence post lasts so 7 to 30 years. Want them gone then push or pull up or let roots rot a few years and tip stump out. Probably our #1 weed.

In Houston Black Clay, Texas weather, on a 1/12 sloping hillside, 3-4" fence posts lasted 7 years. Really didn't plan on that short of a survival time. Thought Cedar was more soil resistant than that.

Cedars are prolific growers in this soil and anybody that doesn't mow or plow their acreage will find that in a few years it will be dominated by the things. Dozing into a pile is the normal method of handling here. County has a burn ban but has rules for burning so you can burn the piles when things are right for it and you have a permit and follow the guidelines.
 
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BRYANT

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Texasmark":2zolfecx said:
Ebenezer":2zolfecx said:
BRYANT":2zolfecx said:
Would it make a difference if the sap is up or down on how long it takes a cedar stump to rot away? Other wise will the time of year that you cut/shear them make any difference on how long it takes for the snag to rot?
Don't think so. Will take about as long to rot as a fence post lasts so 7 to 30 years. Want them gone then push or pull up or let roots rot a few years and tip stump out. Probably our #1 weed.

In Houston Black Clay, Texas weather, on a 1/12 sloping hillside, 3-4" fence posts lasted 7 years. Really didn't plan on that short of a survival time. Thought Cedar was more soil resistant than that.

Cedars are prolific growers in this soil and anybody that doesn't mow or plow their acreage will find that in a few years it will be dominated by the things. Dozing into a pile is the normal method of handling here. County has a burn ban but has rules for burning so you can burn the piles when things are right for it and you have a permit and follow the guidelines.
The man that I talked to from the Noble foundation did say that He thought the amount of Nitrogen in the soil would have an affect on rot time. I am still waiting for the return call from the man that is involved in there cedar removal program.
 

dun

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I wonder if the alkaline level in the soil has anything to do with rot time. In the Mojave if you put in a heavy weight T-post it would rot in 3-4 years. A plain piece of wood just even a 2x2 would last for 20 years and show now signs of deteriation other then severe weathering from the heat and lack of humidity. Above ground it would crack and shatter but below ground it would be pretty much like it was the day you put it in.
 

Texasmark

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dun":2hrtmorl said:
I wonder if the alkaline level in the soil has anything to do with rot time. In the Mojave if you put in a heavy weight T-post it would rot in 3-4 years. A plain piece of wood just even a 2x2 would last for 20 years and show now signs of deteriation other then severe weathering from the heat and lack of humidity. Above ground it would crack and shatter but below ground it would be pretty much like it was the day you put it in.

I don't remember which way is which on the scale, but we are alkaline by a point. Drinking water comes from the Woodbine Aquifer and community wells are dug at 1800-2000', highly alkaline. Put a pan of water on the stove and when evaporated pretty good crust on the bottom......baths are great, really soft water, no iron stains, plumbing lasts many many years.

My hill was once deemed "Highly Eroded". I put the fence up early in my occupancy so it wasn't all that great at the time in terms of soil condition.

HTH
 

dun

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Just did some research and it turns out the ph in that area runs 9-10. Plus it's caliche and forms an impenetrable layer so water can;t get through it.
 
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