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rear legs too long...

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ArmyDoc

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Question. It seems like all the photos of bulls on semen sites, breeders etc, show the bulls going up hill. Sometimes it's quite dramatic. Clearly they are doing this to make the topline flat. Has anyone else noticed this? Is it a problem? seems....dishonest somehow.

I can't help but wonder if this isn't the end result of measuring frame size based on hip height... Have we been sellecting bulls with taller rear ends than front ends for the past however many years its been being used?
 

dun

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I don;t know the reason but they're basicly "head shots" like used for models. The point is to make the animal look it's very best. It may hide some flaws but paintshop does a pretty good job of that too.
 

TexasBred

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ArmyDoc":l7voscg6 said:
Question. It seems like all the photos of bulls on semen sites, breeders etc, show the bulls going up hill. Sometimes it's quite dramatic. Clearly they are doing this to make the topline flat. Has anyone else noticed this? Is it a problem? seems....dishonest somehow.

I can't help but wonder if this isn't the end result of measuring frame size based on hip height... Have we been sellecting bulls with taller rear ends than front ends for the past however many years its been being used?

Use to dairy cattle were always photographed with their front feed actually on a pile of grass or other material to raise the front-end up. Next time you look at pics or a magazine check it out.
 

DOC HARRIS

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ArmyDoc-

You, and all others who have noticed that both bulls AND cows, physiologically, have longer rear legs than front legs. They are made that way naturally. Consider this: Bovine animals arise from a reclining position with their hind legs standing first - then their front legs bring their front end up last to a completed standing position. Horses, on the other hand, perform that standing action in reverse - their front legs straighten first - then their rear legs finish the job. If you will take note of the shoulder points on a bull (or cow), you will see that they are closer to the ground than the hook bones, or pin bones. Physically, their front legs are shorter than their hind legs. This is one physical manifestation which causes the top line (spine) to appear sagging - or not level - on some individuals. The positioning of the front legs slightly higher than the rear legs allows the spine to "level" slightly, and the top line to appear more level.

I agree with you - it is as - "dishonest somehow" - as most of the Shampoo -Wash - comb - brush -blow - curl - glue - paint - shave - clip - trim - show tricks that the Club Calf and 4H and FFA exhibitors practice. Some of the "Wash, Blow, and Go!" show procedures are okay. No one wishes to see an animal with mud, manure, muck and tags hanging all over their rumps in a show or sale ring, or with hair on their heads so long that you can't see the standard breed characteristics. but there is a point of common sense that should be adhered to just to prevent their being liars!

I concur with the practice of animals standing with their front legs slightly higher than their rear legs, just for the aesthestic factor of appearances - not attempting to lie or cover up a fault in an animal, or to make it appear as something that it is NOT! Just as I think that a man should wear a tie and a suit when meeting royalty - but NOT bow and kiss his hand!!

DON'T GET ME STARTED!

DOC HARRIS
 

KNERSIE

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Setting an animal up with his front feet SLIGHTLY higher than the rear will hide small topline flaws and make the animal look longer.

The reason so many young bulls looks like they are walking downhill with their rear higher than the front is because we selected for more growth and later maturing cattle the last 30 years. The high rear end is simply an indication that the animal is still growing and hasn't matured yet, (within limits). A very high rear end will just about always go hand in hand with a long cannon bone.
 

brandonm_13

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Personally, I think all pictures should be natural. I want to see what the animal would look like if it were on my farm. That doesn't mean muddy or dirty, but I want to be able to imagine him walking around. They can't graze very well from that posing position.
 
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ArmyDoc

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Ok. I was having a hard time reconciling that they say for good conformation you want a flat top-line, but then very few actually were flat, if they were standing level. I tried looking for "the base line bovine" best I could come up with is something like a water buffallo, and they have have flat toplines. So I started thinking maybe we were sellecting for animals with big butts, and wondered why.

Ok, harder question. How much is too much? And at what age should it be flat? (if ever) Or is this a minor consideration in the larger picture?
 

DOC HARRIS

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ArmyDoc wrote: [Ok, harder question. How much is too much? And at what age should it be flat? (if ever) Or is this a minor consideration in the larger picture?]

This comes under the similar queries - "How long is a string" - "How high is up?" - "How far can you run into the forest?" It breaks down to a matter of perception on the part of the observer. When you really think about it - the concept of "How much is TOO much" can be applied to almost every aspect of living - and certainly to Agriculture. At what stage of growth and development do you cut hay for the best benefit to your cattle? When is the best time to ship your calves? What is the best bull to use on MY cows - and WHY??

I suppose there is NO correct answer to ANY question. You just have to have as much knowledge about your business as you can, and then use your best judgement. . . .and as much assistance from GOD as you can ask for!

DOC HARRIS
 

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